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DB appointed 7/11/1800.

File: 0925NTS.NT3



    Created: 7/31/2017 6:43:21 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20148-25363
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20148-25363


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July 1921, in commemoration of centennial of Missouri statehood, 250,000 50 cent coins struck, DB head on obverse; figure of Indian and Missouri pioneer on reverse.

File: 0925NTS.NT3



    Created: 7/31/2017 6:44:33 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20148-25364
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20148-25364


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Territory of Louisiana: James Wilkinson governor 1805-07; Meriwether Lewis 1807-09; Benjamin Howard 1809-12. 1812, Territory of Missouri: William Clark governor

File: 0925NTS.NT3



    Created: 7/31/2017 6:45:23 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20148-25365
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20148-25365


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Missouri population 1810 20,845; 1812, 26,000 (perhaps 2500).

File: 0925NTS.NT3



    Created: 7/31/2017 6:47:15 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20148-25366
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20148-25366


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BAKELESS, John E. Born and raised among the Indians of the Carlisle Indian School in PA, where his father was in charge of academic work. Cum laude graduate of Williams College; Harvard PhD, where he was the only man in a century to take the Bowdoin prize in two sucessive years. Winner of two Guggenheim Fellowships. Served in both World Wars. Author of DANIEL BOONE: MASTER OF THE WILDERNESS (1939); LEWIS AND CLARK: PARTNERS IN DISCOVERY (1947); THE EYES OF DISCOVERY: THE PAGEANT OF NORTH AS SEEN BY THE FIRST EXPLORERS (1950); BACKGROUND TO GLORY: THE LIFE OF GEORGE ROGERS CLARK (1957).

File: BAKENT10.NT2



    Created: 8/1/2017 10:46:10 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20148-25487
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20148-25487


1784

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John Filson, THE ADVENTURES OF COL. DANIEL BOON in THE DISCOVERY, SETTLEMENT AND PRESENT STATE OF KENTUCKE (1784)

Thomas Jefferson (1786): "We have lately seen a single person go & decide on a settlement in Kentucky, many hundred miles from any white inhabitant, remove thither with his family and a few neighbors, & though perpetually harassed by the Indians, that settlement in the course of 10 years has acquired 30,000 inhabitants, its numbers are increasing while we are writing, and the state of which it formerly made a part has offered it independence."

Daniel Bryan, THE MOUNTAIN MUSE (1813), Boone chosen by heaven to bring Civilization to the trans-Allegheny wilderness.

NILES WEEKLY REGISTER (1816): "This singular man could not live in Kentucky when it became settled. . . . He might have accumulated riches as readily as any man in Kentucky, but he prefers the woods, where you see him in the dress of the roughest, poorest hunter."

Byron, seven stanzas on Boone in the eighth canto of DON JUAN (1823) which made Boone a world-wide celebrity; were reprinted in America the same year in LIFE AND ADVENTURES OF COLONEL DANIEL BOONE, THE FIRST WHITE SETTLER OF THE STATE OF KENTUCKY . . . WRITTEN BY HIMSELF .. ANNEXED IS A EULOGY ON COL. BOONE AND CHOICE OF LIFE, BY LORD BYRON, in which the anoymous author writes that Boone "would certainly prefer a state of nature to a state of Civilization if he wre obliged to be confined to one or the other." Parkman: "the slightly decadent cult of wildness and savagery which the early nineteenth century took over from Byron," which mood the historians call "primitivism."

James Fenimore Cooper had Boone in mind in devising his title character in the five LEATHERSTOCKING TALES (1823-1841): the perfect woodsman who dislikes the restraints and destructiveness of civilization, who understands and loves the forest, and whose moral qualities are as great as his understanding. One of the first reviews (1823) noted that Leatherstocking "had been modelled from the effigies of old Daniel Boone."

Timothy Flint, THE LIFE AND ADVENTURES OF DANIEL BOONE (1833), saw him in paradoxical terms: he "saw with the prophetic eye of a patriot, that this great valley must soon become the abode of millions of freemen; and his heart swelled with joy;" yet "American enterprize seemed doomed to follow him, and to thrwart all his schemes of backwoods retirement."

James H. Perkins, NORTH AMERICAN REVIEW (1846), wrote that Boone was not led by a hope of gain, nor by desires to escape civilization, but simply by "a love of nature, of perfect freedom, and of the adventurous life in the woods."

John M. Peck, LIVES OF DANIEL BOONE AND BENJAMIN LINCOLN (1847), quoted Boone as believing that he had been "a creature of PRovidence, ordained by Heaven as a pioneer in the wilderness, to advance the civilization and the extension of his country."

Horatio Greenough, THE RESCUE (1837-51) in the east wing of the capitol building, depicts the contest between civilization and savagry as a fierce hand-to-hand struggle between a gigantic, heroic Boone and an Indian warrior.

George C. Bingham, THE EMIGRATION OF DANIEL BOONE (1851), shows him leading his family and neighbors into Kentucky, which they clearly mean to farm.

fiction: Churchill, THE CROSSING; Elizabeth Madox Roberts, THE GREAT MEADOW; Caroline Gordon, GREEN CENTURIES

File: BPRSPNTS.NTS



    Created: 8/1/2017 11:18:28 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20148-25492
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20148-25492


1928

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William Clinkenbeard, interview by John D. Shane in my 11CC2, died in 1843, so the interview had to be that year. See "Reverend John D. Shane's Interview with Pioneer William Clinkenbeard," THE FILSON CLUB HISTORY QUARTERLY 2 (1928):95-128.

File: CLNKNBRD.NT2



    Created: 8/2/2017 12:37:47 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20148-25533
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20148-25533


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see xeroxs of reports from Congress.

File: MHS7.NT2



    Created: 8/3/2017 9:36:19 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20148-25698
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20148-25698


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For a drawing of the original stones, see my xerox of the drawing by Merrill E. Gaddis, 2/26/1955; and see his letter in NT2.

File: MHS7.NT2



    Created: 8/3/2017 9:37:09 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20148-25699
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20148-25699


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POTENTIAL ILLUSTRATIONS

Colored Boone woodcut for the cover

portrait of John Filson portrait of Lyman Draper

Pennsylvania homestead Missouri stone house log cabin made by Boone: from Draper collection

Harding portrait

Nathan Boone portrait

Filson map

Boone carving from 1760

File: ILLUST.NTS



    Created: 9/12/2017 7:42:34 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20148-28796
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20148-28796


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RAMSEY MASSACRE, MAY 1815
Notes from John Mack Faragher 08/07/07

David Bryan built his cabin in 1800 near the bank of Teuque creek, on a hill overlooking the MO river bottom; thereafter replaced it with a double-hewed two-storied log house, the first of its kind erected in the country. Remained in use as a dwelling until the 1880s. Flanders Callaway settled the Teuque creek area about the same time as David Bryan; built his cabin in the MO bottom, about half-way between the bluff and river, a mile from each. The Ramseys were near neighbors, about two miles northwest of Marthasville. J. D. Bryan. The Boone-Bryan History (Frankfort, Ky: The Kentucky State Historical Society, [1913?]):69,204

Interview with Delinda Boone Craig, daughter of Nathan Boone (born MO 1801), <Mrs. Craig remembers that she was a chunk of a girl, & it was after her grandmother's death, that a report came that the Indians were taking all the settlements in the forks between the two rivers. The goods of Col. Daniel Boone & Flanders Callaway, & others, were put in pirogues, with the black people & their children, & some whites to manage them, several of these pirogues were leashed together; & several ran on a sawyer [?] descending the Missouri, & all the goods were lost. The whites & blacks on board were saved, clinging to the wreck till they were rescued. Thus Col. Boone lost all his books & papers, which were on board. [Including, she reported later in the interview, the papers of Jemima Boone Callaway, who claimed that "she would have all the events of her life written." 30C76]>

The most of the white people went down by land -- Col. Boone, Callaway's, Lemme's, the families of David Bryan & his brother, and the two Ramsey families, were among the number. James Boone (son of Nathan B.) & his sister Delinda were at the time at Charette going to school. . . . They reached their destination, Boone's Station, named after Col. Daniel Boone, & his sons Daniel M. & Nathan Boone. It was well picketed in, with several cabins on a side. It was not located on the Femme Osage, but some five miles off, between that & the Missouri river, on rather elevated ground where the Fort was built on the Missouri bottom. No Indians ever appeared there. They came about that time, & killed Mrs. Ramsey & five children near Marthasville, which was done by a small scouting party. During the war, they fled from the Charette settlement to Boone's Station several times.> Draper Papers 30C67-69

Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Nathan ordered to raise a company of rangers by Governor William Clark in winter of 1811-12; commissioned by President Madison. Marched up the Mississippi accompanied by Gen. Benjamin Howard; erected Fort madison about 15 miles above the mouth of Salt River on the west bank of the Mississippi. Ranged between the Mississippi and Missouri. After 3 months returned home, raised another company in June for 12 months, went out again under Gen. Howard. 8/1813 Nathan with a party of 17 men went to reconnoitre and select a route for the army to march against the Indian towns at Peoria. Among the men was his nephew James Callaway. Attacked by Indians. Nathan nearly shot, saved by tripping in a sink hole. Was then with the army marching to Peoria. In the home neighborhood, Mrs. Ramsey was killed in her yard near Charette [Marthasville]; Mr. Ramsey wounded but kept the Indians off; children in the house. In one battle in 1815 James Callaway killed; left wife and three children; had been member of the MO territorial council, sheriff and collector of St. Charles county. 6S254-267

Interview with Morgan and Elizabeth Boone Bryan, she a daughter of Flanders Callaway, Marthasville MO, 11/25/1851: Near Marthasville, Mrs. Ramsey and two of her children, one boy, one girl were killed in April or May of 1815. Mr. Ramsey was a cripple; he held the Indians off from within his cabin with another son. A fourth child, a little girl, hid in the weeds along the fence and the Indians overlooked her. There was a fort near Flanders Callaway's where DB was at the time; he shouldered his rifle and went on the trail of the Indians, went all through the woods to satisfy himself that they were gone. DB calm and vigilant. Most of the men were absent on ranging duty. Draper Papers 6S299-300

Attack on Ramsey family, 5/20/1815 <Colonel Boone, who was in Callaway's Fort, at Charrette, was sent for to dress their wounds, his long experience in such matters having rendered him very efficient. The news of the massacre had preceded the messenger, and when he arrived at the fort Boone was pacing up and down in front of an open space in the stockades, which had not been completed, with his gun on his shoulder, and whistling in his usual undisturbed manner. Mrs. Ramsey gave premature birth to a child, and died shortly afterward, but her husband recovered from his would and lived several years. Two of the children who had been tomahawked died during the day, but the other lived until the fourth day. An eye witness, who arrived upon the scene about ten o'clock describes it as most heart-rending. The children were lying upon the floor, two of them in the agonies of death, and every time they struggled for breath the blood and brains oozed out at the wounds made by the murderous tomahawks. Mrs. Ramsey was in an adjoining room, but her groans of agony could be plainly heard. Her husband was lying upon a bed in the front room, and Boone was engaged in extracting the bullet, which had passed through the groin and lodged near the surface on the back of the hip. The old pioneer was quiet and unexcited, as usual, but his lips were compressed and a fire gleamed from his eyes that indicated danger to any saveage that might have come within his reach at that time. Strong men, looking upon those murdered children, wept and silently vowed vengeance against the inhuman foe.> J. D. Bryan. The Boone-Bryan History (Frankfort, Ky: The Kentucky State Historical Society, [1913?]):103-104

He was rejected for formal service, but <the settlers of the region, however, did not reject his services, for his very presence always lent fortitude and courage to those families attacked by the Indians. He was present in March, 1815, when the body of his grandson, Captain James Callaway, was recovered from Loutre River after he and his men had been ambushed on their return to Fort Clemson on Loutre Island with the horses that had been stolen by the Sax and Fox Indians. In May of the same year he was called early in the morning from Callaway Fort at Charette to the home of Robert Ramsay after the massacre there. His long experience with wounds inflicted by Indian arrows and tomahawks made him efficient in dressing such wounds. He could not save the life of Mrs. Ramsay and the child born permaturely that day nor two of the children who had been tomahawked, but he did extract, with the utmost calm and skill of any surgeon of today, the bullet from Mr. Ramsay who had run without his wooden leg to the assistance of his wife who was milking in a nearby cowpen. With his usual quietness and calmness and with lips tightly compressed, the old pioneer aided the injured and dying. He was as gentle as a mother with the little child who lived for four days after having been tomahawked.> Rolla P. Andrae, A True, Brief History of Daniel Boone (Defiance, MO: Daniel Boone Home, 1985):43-44

Massacre of the Ramsey Family. Lived at the extreme limits of the Femme Osage settlement. Ramsey had been advised to move further to the center, but ignored the advice. 5/20/1815 attacked by Indians. He and wife both wounded, but he managed to grab his trumpet and give it a blast what frightened the Indians away. They had tomahawked three children in the yard, and scalped one. Mrs. Ramsey died the next day; Mr. Ramsey recovered. DB doctored the injured, removing the bullet from Mr. Ramsey. Next morning Indians attacked the Jonathan Bryan residence, 15 miles from the Ramseys. Mrs. Bryan and a negro woman alone with two children, the men away at the scene of the earlier attack. The women heard a scream from the yard and looked out to see an Indian running after a black boy with a raised tomahawk and a rifle in the other hand. Just as the Indian reached the door they slammed the door on his right arm and head and held him fast; the black woman wrenched the tomahawk from his hand and struck him on the head, killing him instantly. Another scream from the yard, and they looked out to see the boy being chased by another Indian. Mrs. Bryan grabbed the gun of the first Indian and killed the second a few feet from the door. The two Indians were buried on a rocky hill near the home, a large rock placed over their graves so they could not be detected by other Indians, and this rock was a prominent marker on the property for many years. Rolla P. Andrae, A True, Brief History of Daniel Boone (Defiance, MO: Daniel Boone Home, 1985):76-77

File: RAMSEY MASSACRE.txt



    Created: 9/28/2017 10:10:38 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20148-28967
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