THE KENTUCKY LAND GRANTS: A SYSTEMATIC INDEX TO ALL OF THE LAND GRANTS RECORDED IN THE STATE LAND OFFICE AT FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY, 1782-1924. Filson Club Publications: No. 33

1925

THE KENTUCKY LAND GRANTS: A SYSTEMATIC INDEX TO ALL OF THE LAND GRANTS RECORDED IN THE STATE LAND OFFICE AT FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY, 1782-1924. Filson Club Publications: No. 33

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1: <With literally thousands of rugged people pushing their domestic caravans over the Wilderness Trail into Kentucky in search of lands for homesteads or for speculation, the struggle for possession became intense. The richest and best situated lsand, topographically, was surveyed and entered upon again and again. While squatters, strong of mind and purpose, frequently held some land without title; others like Daniel Boone failed to meet certain legal requirements and though undoubtedly rightfully entitled to the land lost it because of technicalities. Up to 1775 land in Kentucky had been surveyed principally for veterans of the French and Indian War in accordance with the laws of Virginia. At this point Henderson began his broad system of surveys in central Kentucky. He was beset at every turn by homesteading pioneers who, without surveys or purchase title, stubbornly held to the land they had settled upon and improved. To meet this distant and difficult situation, the Colony of Virginia issued a resolution in favor of these pioneers. This was enacted into a law shortly thereafter which declared that all who were possessed of land in Kentucky prior to June, 1776, should be allowed 400 acres of homestead. Henderson protesting in favor of his ambitious land project was remeoved entirely from the Blue Grass region and settled in western Kentucky just south of the Ohio River.> continued

File: JLLSN6.NT2



    Created: 8/1/2017 6:58:32 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20185-25457
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20185-25457


1925

THE KENTUCKY LAND GRANTS: A SYSTEMATIC INDEX TO ALL OF THE LAND GRANTS RECORDED IN THE STATE LAND OFFICE AT FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY, 1782-1924. Filson Club Publications: No. 33

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2: <This unfortunate legislation marked the beginning of extensive land allocation in a new territory prior to its actual survey into regular township divisions. Virginia was busy playing her important part in the Revolution and had neither time nor money to survey accurately her western domain. Her failure to do so brought down upon the State of Kentucky an endless travail of land litigation which saw its zenith in the early part of the nineteenth century. Court action concerning these early surveys and grants has persisted down even to the present time, and will probably be contined intermittently for generations to come. In 1779 a land law was passed which attempted to smooth out all difficulties. According to this Virginia statute every settler who had occupied a tract and had raised a crop before January 1, 1778, was entitled to 400 acres at the prince of $2.25 per 100 acres, and was allowed the further right to pre-empt an additional 1,000 acres at $40.00 per hundred acres. This was done to provide for the actual needs of the settler as against the non-resident speculator. . . . The law further required that all future land purchases must be made by means of land warrants. These were issued in any number and amount depending on the desire of the purchaser. Bounds were required to plainly blazed upon the selected tract following which came a detailed survey and possession. Such a loose, indefinite method of land allocation resulted in endless confusion and litigation. Many tracts, highly desirable because of their position, were claimed and reclaimed, surveyed and resurveyed, patented and repatented with much bitter feeling and resentment following, and not always without bloodshed. . . . To assist in mitigating the evils of the day Virginia established a court of four land commissioners to examine claims and award titles of possession. This court sat at Harrodstown, Louisville, Bryant's Station, and Boonesborough. It accomplished much good, but the settlement of the State was so rapid that a few years after it had ceased to function the general land condition was as bad as ever. One of the notable results, however, of the land court litigation and dissension was the early granting to Kentucky by Virginia of a liberal county government in 1776, and statehood in 1792.> Willard Rouse Jillson, THE KENTUCKY LAND GRANTS: A SYSTEMATIC INDEX TO ALL OF THE LAND GRANTS RECORDED IN THE STATE LAND OFFICE AT FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY, 1782-1924. Filson Club Publications: No. 33 (Louisville: Standard Printing Company, 1925):3-5

File: JLLSN6.NT2



    Created: 8/1/2017 6:58:59 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20185-25458
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20185-25458


1925

THE KENTUCKY LAND GRANTS: A SYSTEMATIC INDEX TO ALL OF THE LAND GRANTS RECORDED IN THE STATE LAND OFFICE AT FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY, 1782-1924. Filson Club Publications: No. 33

Keywords
None.
People
None.
DB land grants: 1/25/1783: 379 acres not located, Fayette, VG [Virginia Grant] 2/11/1783: 1000 acres on Silver Creek, Lincoln, VG 3/30/1784: 1000 acres on Rockyford Fork and Stoners Fork, Fayette, VG 4/15/1784: 1000 acres on East Fork Hickmans Creek, Fayette, VG 4/10/1785: 4000 acres on North Fork and Main Licking River, Fayette, VG 4/10/1785: 1000 acres on Licking River, Fayette, VG 9/2/1785: 500 acres on Duitts Creek, Fayette, Old Kentucky Grant 9/4/1797: 1000 acres on Sturgeon Creek, Madison, Old Kentucky Grant Willard Rouse Jillson, THE KENTUCKY LAND GRANTS: A SYSTEMATIC INDEX TO ALL OF THE LAND GRANTS RECORDED IN THE STATE LAND OFFICE AT FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY, 1782-1924. Filson Club Publications: No. 33 (Louisville: Standard Printing Company, 1925):25, 150

File: JLLSN6.NT2



    Created: 8/1/2017 6:59:22 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20185-25459
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20185-25459














    

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