Charles M. Knapp, "Daniel Boone and Kentucky," THE KENTUCKIAN-CITIZEN, 3/27/1935

1935

Charles M. Knapp, "Daniel Boone and Kentucky," THE KENTUCKIAN-CITIZEN, 3/27/1935

Keywords
None.
People
None.
<Boone now tried a venture that was in some ways different from anything that he had turned to heretofore. He became a tavern keeper, though it is probable that his wife really was the manager of the business. For he still continued to practice surveying and he still continued to hunt and trap as of old when the seasons were favorable. In addition he became a small trader, trading goods for furs up and down the Ohio. These latter occupations gave him the excitement that had been associated with his earlier life. The goods that he traded were obtained in Maryland and there he traded in return his furs, skins, and ginseng which he had either taken himself or taken in trade for goods. This trading was not really a peaceful or safe life, for the Ohio river route was still subject to attack from the Indians. Heavy was the annual loss of life and goods among the travellers and traders. But Boone seems to have been successful, if not really happy.> Charles M. Knapp, "Daniel Boone and Kentucky," THE KENTUCKIAN-CITIZEN, 3/27/1935; clipping in biographical file, Kentucky Historical Society.

File: KHS5.NT2



    Created: 8/1/2017 7:19:50 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20187-25466
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20187-25466


1935

Charles M. Knapp, "Daniel Boone and Kentucky," THE KENTUCKIAN-CITIZEN, 3/27/1935

Keywords
None.
People
None.
<In Boone's old survey books are records of entries of claims for himself totalling thousands of acres. He seems never to have thought that his claims to whatsoever land he wanted, Daniel Boone's claims to land, would ever be questioned by anyone who knew his relation to Kentucky. But when claim-jumpers appeared and discovered that Boone had not entered claims to these lands in strict ac- [sic] they took advantage of Boone, and entered claims to his preemptions in their own names. Land suit after land suit followed to eject Boone from his lands. By 1788 Boone had lost in this way about all the claims to land that he had thought his own.> <We must, I think, find the expanation for Boone's apparent carelessness in financial maters, particularly about land, in the fact that Boone undertook to claim for himself very large tracts of land. There were fees to be paid in connection with the legal entry of land and when that was done they became liable to taxation. Faced with that situation Boone probably kept putting off the time for making good his claims until it was too late. His absences from Kentucky were frequent, as we know, and it was probably while he was away that his claims were jumped. Perhaps Boone lost heavily, not because he did not know what he should be doing with respect to his claims to land but because he was trying to be too smart. At any rate Boone by 1788 had lost his title to about all the lands which he thought were to be his. Settlers with money did not come rapidly enough for Boone to enter his claims and sell them, and then take up the next ones and so make his fortune. Neither could he reside on them all at once and cultivate them and make them pay their own way, meet taxes and initial fees. Settlers came but without money; and if they did have it they did not see why they should buy even Boone's choice claims when there was so much land that could be obtained by the simple means of entereing claims legally and then residing upon them and so making them pay out for themselves. Boone like others then was speculating in lands, and like so many others have done since, undertook to speculate so largely that he was not able to finish his speculations. Like many another then Boone lost all he had.> Charles M. Knapp, "Daniel Boone and Kentucky," THE KENTUCKIAN-CITIZEN, 3/27/1935; clipping in biographical file, Kentucky Historical Society.

File: KHS5.NT2



    Created: 8/1/2017 7:20:51 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20187-25467
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20187-25467


1935

Charles M. Knapp, "Daniel Boone and Kentucky," THE KENTUCKIAN-CITIZEN, 3/27/1935

Keywords
None.
People
None.
<At first he tried his hand at keeping a store. Later he moved to the neighborhood of Charleston. Soone he was deputy-surveyor for Kanawa [sic] county. In general he was engaged in the same kind of things that he had before, while in Limestone, surveying lands for speculators, taking small contracts for sypplying the militia when called out for service against the Indians, hunting and trapping, and participating in raids upon the Indians north of the Ohio. In 1790 as a result of a popular election he was appointed lieutenant-colonel of Kanawa county. Again his place in a frontier society was quickly recognized. In 1791 he was elected once again a representative to the Virginia legislature and served in the session lasting from October to December 20th.> Charles M. Knapp, "Daniel Boone and Kentucky," THE KENTUCKIAN-CITIZEN, 3/27/1935; clipping in biographical file, Kentucky Historical Society.

File: KHS5.NT2



    Created: 8/1/2017 7:21:35 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20187-25468
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20187-25468


1935

Charles M. Knapp, "Daniel Boone and Kentucky," THE KENTUCKIAN-CITIZEN, 3/27/1935

Keywords
None.
People
None.
<Under the Virginia land law the titles granted by the Transylvania Company were declared void and it was therefore necessary to obtain from the State of Virginia new warrants for all land claims. Entrusted by Nathaniel and Thomas Hart with about $20,000 in depreciated continental paper, worth very much less that face value at this time, and with what funds he himself possessed, Boone started out. But on the way he was robbed of these moneys. Where or how it was accomplished we do not know. Boone lost all that he had at this time. The Harts were better able from their great wealth to stand the loss. Others who had also entrusted their funds to Boone suffered as he did. Boone was suspected, but the Harts had confidence in him. Others criticized him, but public opinion was in his favor. Later in the year Virginia granted Boone a preemption of 1000 acres in what is now Bourbon County.> Charles M. Knapp, "Daniel Boone and Kentucky," THE KENTUCKIAN-CITIZEN, 3/6/1935; clipping in biographical file, Kentucky Historical Society.

File: KHS5.NT2



    Created: 8/1/2017 7:22:05 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20187-25469
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20187-25469














    

SourceNotes
sourcenotes.miamioh.edu