Mann Butler, VALLEY OF THE OHIO, edited by G. Glenn Clift and Hambleton Tapp (Frankfort: Kentucky Historical Society, 1971)

1971

Mann Butler, VALLEY OF THE OHIO, edited by G. Glenn Clift and Hambleton Tapp (Frankfort: Kentucky Historical Society, 1971)

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BUTLER VALLEY OF THE OHIO was serialized in THE WESTERN JOURNAL AND CIVILIAN (St. Louis) from 1853 until Butler's death in 1855. Butler (1784-1855), a teacher, journalist, and leading cultural figure in early 19th century Lexington, was the first major collector of manuscripts pertaining to Kentucky history. OUt of this collection, and from his hundreds of interviews with early settlers, he wrote his A HISTORY OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY (1834). Disappointed with the sales of this book, and with the unwillingness of the state legislature to purchase his collection of documents for the historical society, he moved to St. Louis in 1844 where he became a justice of the peace and notary, and became an important cultural leader. He was killed in a railroad accident. BUTLER:editor's introduction.

File: BTLR.NT2



    Created: 8/1/2017 11:56:08 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20221-25512
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1971

Mann Butler, VALLEY OF THE OHIO, edited by G. Glenn Clift and Hambleton Tapp (Frankfort: Kentucky Historical Society, 1971)

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Louise Phelps Kellogg noted that Butler "presented Boone fairly in an effort to counteract Flint's misrepresentations." The editors of VALLEY OF THE OHIO add that he failed, however, to stress fully Boone's greatest abilities, contributions, and value to Kentucky. BUTLER:editor's introduction

File: BTLR.NT2



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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20221-25513
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20221-25513


1971

Mann Butler, VALLEY OF THE OHIO, edited by G. Glenn Clift and Hambleton Tapp (Frankfort: Kentucky Historical Society, 1971)

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BUTLER writes: It is <a populat notion extensively entertained beyond the western country that Daniel Boone was the principal leader and most efficient spirit among the western pioneers. No mistake can be more profound. Not that the author would for one moment ignobly try to depreciate the real merits of Boone; he adopts and endeavors to pursue the sentiment of the poet "Nothing extenuate, nor aught set down in malice." Boone was an unrivalled hunter, an honest and kind-hearted woodsman, and in a subordinate capacity a good soldier; but at no period of his life did his abilities, either natural or acquired, rank him as a leading spirit of Kentucky or the West, either in council or in action. He came at first to Kentucky as a private hunter from North Carolina, and afterwards in al probability as an agent of the great land company of Henderson and Company, certainly so in 1774 and 1775. But in no one expedition of higher grade than a scouting party was Boone a leader. It is true that he bravely participated in the bloody battle of the Blue Licks, as has been seen, and gave advice on that malancholy occasion, which if it had been adopted, might in strong probability have averted if it had not reversed the fortunes of that disasterous encounter. In this battle he was not the commander, but Col. John Todd, of Fayette County. Did Boone ever CONCEIVE, much more LEAD such expeditions, as either the mission to the Virginia Convention, in 1776, which eventuated in the establishment by Virginia of Kentucky county? Of the Illinois campaigns in 1778 and 1779, which tended so materially to the conquest of the northwestern portion of the valley of the Ohio? Or the campaigns of 1781 and 1782? In all these measures, [George Rogers] Clark was, by the admission of all his contemporaries, the leading spirit, and after him Col's. Floyd, Ben Logan, John and Levi Todd, Christian and Hardin.> BUTLER:246-247

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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1971

Mann Butler, VALLEY OF THE OHIO, edited by G. Glenn Clift and Hambleton Tapp (Frankfort: Kentucky Historical Society, 1971)

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<Neither Arab nor Tartar, nor even our own native Indians were more constantly on the lookout for the attacks of an enemy than were the backwoodsmen of the West. Indeed, the most faithful idea that can be formed of our frontier countrymen, at this period, is that they were Indians in many respects more than their complexions. One most honorable exception to this remark, it would be cruel not to state, was their mercy to females and children in the prosecution of the relentless barbarity of war with savages. . . . In these expeditions, the analogy to Indian manners was again displayed; the hold of officers on their men was slight; popularity was most significant. Officers might advise, but they could not command obedience; they might counsel, and those who approved of their advise, followed it, while those who did not, stayed at home. Public odium waas he only punishment for their laziness or their cowardice. This was, however, a severe penalty in a state of society in which public opinion was powerful, and sympathy with each other intense.> BUTLER:218-19

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