Thomas D. Clark, "Salt, a Factor in the Settlement of Kentucky," THE FILSON CLUB HISTORY QUARTERLY 12 (1938) 42-52

1938

Thomas D. Clark, "Salt, a Factor in the Settlement of Kentucky," THE FILSON CLUB HISTORY QUARTERLY 12 (1938) 42-52

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<The first important economic influence felt in Kentucky was, in all probability, the attraction which the salt licks had for game. Animals trudging overland to the licks during the centuries before the first appearance of the white man in the western country outlined a system of highways, the course of which had not, until recent years, been materially changed.> The WILDERNESSROAD is an example. CLARK5:42

File: CLARK5.NT2



    Created: 8/2/2017 12:33:50 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20228-25531
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20228-25531


1938

Thomas D. Clark, "Salt, a Factor in the Settlement of Kentucky," THE FILSON CLUB HISTORY QUARTERLY 12 (1938) 42-52

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Because it is underlain by calciferous sandrock, water seeping through fissures in many sections was of a high salt content. To extract the salt, water was evaporated, leaving the mineral adhering to the sides of the kettles. A bushel of salt could be obtained from 400 gallons of water. Since so much of the frontier diet consisted of fresh meat, salt was extremely important to both make it palatable and to preserve it. Later the trade in pork, most of it salted, increased the demand for the production of salt. CLARK5:45

File: CLARK5.NT2



    Created: 8/2/2017 12:34:25 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20228-25532
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20228-25532














    

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