George Dekker, "Last of the Mohicans," George Dekker and McWilliams John P., Fenimore Cooper: The Critical Heritage(London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1973) 23 (1973)

1826

George Dekker, "Last of the Mohicans," George Dekker and McWilliams John P., Fenimore Cooper: The Critical Heritage(London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1973) 23 (1973)

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Leatherstocking is <a bold and original conception, which we think, upon the whole, the best piece of invention our author has ever produced; one, we may say, which deserves to be ranked in the first class of the creations of genius. The scout, though averse to the modes of life "down in the settlements," is neither a savage, nor a misanthrope; on the contrary, he has a vast deal of the milk of human kindness in his composition, with an excellent moral code of his own manufacture, and religious notions which certainly do great honor to the wilderness.> W. H. Gardner, review of LAST OF THE MOHICANS, in NORTH AMERICAN REVIEW 23 (July 1826), reprinted in George Dekker and John P. McWilliams, eds., FENIMORE COOPER: THE CRITICAL HERITAGE (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1973):114.

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    Created: 8/2/2017 1:01:34 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20234-25542
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20234-25542


1840

George Dekker, "Last of the Mohicans," George Dekker and McWilliams John P., Fenimore Cooper: The Critical Heritage(London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1973) 23 (1973)

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Honore de Balzac, review of THE PATHFINDER, in PARIS REVIEW 7/25/1840: <Leather-Stocking is a statue, a magnificent moral hermaphrodite, born of the savage state and of civilization, who will live as long as literatures last. . . . It is especially, by that man, half Indian, half civilized, that Cooper has risen to the level of Walter Scott.> reprinted in George Dekker and John P. McWilliams, eds., FENIMORE COOPER: THE CRITICAL HERITAGE (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1973):196.

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    Created: 8/2/2017 1:02:41 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20234-25543
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20234-25543


1852

George Dekker, "Last of the Mohicans," George Dekker and McWilliams John P., Fenimore Cooper: The Critical Heritage(London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1973) 23 (1973)

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Francis Parkman, "The Works of James Fenimore Cooper," NORTH AMERICAN REVIEW 74 (1852):147-61: <There is something admirably felicitious in the conception of this hybrid offspring of civilization and barbarism, in whom uprightness, kindliness, innate philosophy, and the truest moral perceptions are joined with the wandering instincts and hatred of restraint which stamp the Indian or the Bedouin. Nor is the character in the least unnatural. The white denizens of the forest and the prairie are often among the worst, though never among the meanest, of mankind; but it is equally true, that where the moral instincts are originally strong, they may find nutriment and growth among the rude scenes and grand associations of the wilderness. Men as true, generous, and kindly as Leatherstocking may still be found among the perilous solitudes of the West. The quiet, unostentatious courage of Cooper's hero had its counterpart in the character of Daniel Boone; and the latter had the same unaffected love of nature which forms so pleasing a feature in the mind of Leatherstocking.> reprinted in George Dekker and John P. McWilliams, eds., FENIMORE COOPER: THE CRITICAL HERITAGE (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1973):252.

File: CRIT.NT3



    Created: 8/2/2017 1:04:03 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20234-25544
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20234-25544


George Dekker, "Last of the Mohicans," George Dekker and McWilliams John P., Fenimore Cooper: The Critical Heritage(London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1973) 23 (1973)

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Bret Harte, "Muck-a-Muck: A Modern Indian Novel After Cooper": a beautiful maiden is confronted in the forest by a monstrous grizzly, a mountain lion, a wild cat, and a buffalo, "in Indian file." She prepares to faint, when she hears a low voice behind her. <"Eternally dog-gone my skin ef this ain't the puttiest chance yet!" At the same moment, a long, shining barrel dropped lightly from behind her, and rested over her shoulder. . . . "Dern ye -- don't move! . . . The crack of a rifle rang through the woods. Three firghtful yells wer heard, and two sullen roars. Five animals bounded into the air and five lifeless bodies lay upon the plain. . . . "My preserver!" she shrieked, and fell into the arms of Natty Bumpo.> reprinted in George Dekker and John P. McWilliams, eds., FENIMORE COOPER: THE CRITICAL HERITAGE (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1973):273.

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    Created: 8/2/2017 1:04:49 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20234-25545
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20234-25545














    

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