Amy Clifford, "The Authentic Image of Daniel Boone," MISSOURI HISTORICAL REVIEW (1988), 153-64

1988

Amy Clifford, "The Authentic Image of Daniel Boone," MISSOURI HISTORICAL REVIEW (1988), 153-64

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Chester Harding came to KY from New England as a young man to join his brother Horace in Paris. He stopped at Pittsburgh where he saw a portrait painter at work, and by the time he reached KY he was sufficiently adept at painting to make a good living at "$25 a head." He went back east to study. Saw Thomas Sully at work in Philadelphia. Was back in the west by 1819; economic hard times, decided to go to St. Louis, where he raised his fees to $40. He sought out Boone on his own, <with a sound instinct for an opportunity.> [154] Harding's original painting was a full-length portrait. He left the west in 1821, and had a brilliant career as a portrait painter in the east. He left the Boone portrait in Frankfort hoping for a sale to the state. When he returned to KY in 1848 [actually 1845, see DR2 2/15/1845], the state had purchased Allen's painting. Clifford Amyz, "The Authentic Image of Daniel Boone," MISSOURI HISTORICAL REVIEW 82 (1988):153-64.

File: AMYX.NT2



    Created: 8/2/2017 5:51:14 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20240-25560
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20240-25560


1988

Amy Clifford, "The Authentic Image of Daniel Boone," MISSOURI HISTORICAL REVIEW (1988), 153-64

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2/1/1848: <MR. EDITOR: Are the members of the Legislature aware that the portrait of Daniel Boone -- the pioneer of Kentucky -- which is now in the Governor's office is about to be removed from the State by Mr. Hardinge [sic] the painter of it? This is the only painting of the old hunter ever taken from life, and Kentucky should never permit it to go. If the Legislature will not vote the money to buy it, will not each member subscribe $1 towards that object? The balance could be easily raised. Mr. Hardinge has been offered $500 for this portrait by a Historical Society of Boston -- but having offered it to Kentucky fo $200, he still gives her the chance to keep it. O.K.> Reprinted in Clifford Amyz, "The Authentic Image of Daniel Boone," MISSOURI HISTORICAL REVIEW 82 (1988):159-61.

File: AMYX.NT2



    Created: 8/2/2017 5:52:26 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20240-25561
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20240-25561


1988

Amy Clifford, "The Authentic Image of Daniel Boone," MISSOURI HISTORICAL REVIEW (1988), 153-64

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Harding left the portrait in KY even after the legislature refused to buy it in 1848. He finally retrieved it late in life [1861 -- see King, "Portraits of Daniel Boone."] He cut out the head and glued it to a new canvas, repainting the surroundings. His stated reason for destroying the full-length portrait was thus its poor condition, but he may also have been dissatisfied with his technique of forty years before. Leah Lipton, A TRUTHFUL LIKENESS: CHESTER HARDING AND HIS PORTRAITS (Washington: The National Portrait Gallery, 1985) points out that his early work had a "wooden" quality, and figures appeared almost as effigies, as if not painted from life. In 1824 Harding had received stinging crititicism in England in BLACKWOOD'S MAGAZINE: <Mr. Harding is ignorant of drawing. It is evident that he draws only with a full brush, correcing the parts by comparison one with another. Hence it is that his heads and his bodies appear to be the work of two different persons, a master and a bungler> [Lipton:39]. Because Boone had to be "propper up" during the session, Harding probably only painted the bust from life, then did the complete figure back in St. Louis. It is likely, therefore, that Harding destroyed a painting that was a painful reminder of his past. Clifford Amyz, "The Authentic Image of Daniel Boone," MISSOURI HISTORICAL REVIEW 82 (1988):153-64.

File: AMYX.NT2



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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20240-25562
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20240-25562


1988

Amy Clifford, "The Authentic Image of Daniel Boone," MISSOURI HISTORICAL REVIEW (1988), 153-64

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When Harding returned to St. Louis in 1820, a young man, James Otto Lewis, a trained stipple engraver, approached him, asking for the privilege of engraving his likeness of the full length Boone for publication and sale. Lewis was also a part-time actor in Samuel Drake's "Kentucky Company," but was always alert to practice his trade as an engraver. Harding agreed, and furnished a sketch. A notice appeared in the MISSOURI GAZETTE 10/11/1820: <PROPOSALS by HARDING & LEWIS For Publishing by Subscription, an Engraving of the venerable Col. DANIEL BOONE. To transmit to the posterity of a country the actions and features of those who fought and bled in her cause, is a duty too sacred and useful to neglect. While the memory of the heroic deeds of the early adventures is passing away, this work will be means of rescuing from oblivion the features of ONE who took the most active part in sustaining the early settlements of the Western Country; whose fortitude and patriotism is so well worthy of imitation and calculated to call forth the finest feelings of the heart. CONDITIONS: The size of the print will be 15 inches by 10, engraved full length from a characteristic and correct painting, and printed on paper of the first quality. The price to subscribers will be $3 payable on delivery. Subscriptions will be received by JAMES O. LEWIS, Engraver S. Louis.> Clifford Amyz, "The Authentic Image of Daniel Boone," MISSOURI HISTORICAL REVIEW 82 (1988):154-55

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20240-25563
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20240-25563


1988

Amy Clifford, "The Authentic Image of Daniel Boone," MISSOURI HISTORICAL REVIEW (1988), 153-64

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Lewis's engraving shows Boone standing by a tree. He wears a hunter's jacket, the familiar wrap-around coat of the frontier; light buckskin, rather than the dark-dyed jacket Boone typically wore while in KY. Jacket and leggings are fringed; he wears moccasins. He has a proper belt with a buckle. His hat has a tall crown. <The facial likeness surely followed Harding, but the body seems somewhat stiff, a quality critics of Lewis noted throughout his life, even in his lithographs of American Indians.> The copy of this at the Missouri Historical Society is hand-colored. Clifford Amyz, "The Authentic Image of Daniel Boone," MISSOURI HISTORICAL REVIEW 82 (1988):156-57.

File: AMYX.NT2



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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20240-25564
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20240-25564


1988

Amy Clifford, "The Authentic Image of Daniel Boone," MISSOURI HISTORICAL REVIEW (1988), 153-64

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Lewis engaged actor Noah M. Ludlow, also of the "Kentucky Company," to have frames made and to gild these for sale. He ended up playing the most important role in the distribution of the prints. Harding west East without any further involvement; indeed, he may have been dissatisfied with the Lewis engraving. When the advertisement failed to attract subscribers, apparently Lewis and Ludlow attempted to "remainder" a batch of prints at $1 each. By 1822 Ludlow was acting again, now downriver at Louisville, Nashville, and New Orleans. A letter from his brother in the east informed him of the words to "The Hunters of Kentucky," written by Samuel Woodward, author of "The Old Oaken Bucket." Knowing from the engraving the authentic costume of a Kentucky frontiersman, Ludlow copied it as best he could with fringed jacket, leggings, moccasins, and long rifle. His appearance singing "Hunters of Kentucky" became an instant success in New Orleans. This became his stage image. Popular woodcuts of the time, such as those found in DAVEY CROCKETT'S ALAMAC [and in Flint's BOONE] reinforced this frontier image. For the story of his success see Ludlow, DRAMATIC LIFE AS I FOUND IT (St. Louis: G. I. Jones, 1880). Clifford Amyz, "The Authentic Image of Daniel Boone," MISSOURI HISTORICAL REVIEW 82 (1988):153-64.


File: AMYX.NT2



    Created: 8/2/2017 5:54:21 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20240-25565
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20240-25565














    

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