Lucien Beckner, "Eskippakithiki: The Last Indian Town in Kentucky," THE FILSON CLUB HISTORY QUARTERLY 6 (1932) 355-82

1932

Lucien Beckner, "Eskippakithiki: The Last Indian Town in Kentucky," THE FILSON CLUB HISTORY QUARTERLY 6 (1932) 355-82

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Eskippakithiki (Indian Old Fields) flourished from about 1718 to 1754. The Iroquois called it "Kentucky," meaning "level place." Traders knew it as "Little Pict Town." it was settled by the Piqua clan of the Shawnees. "Eskippaki" means "blue-lick," the name for a salt spring; "thiki" means "place." It was on the Warrior's Path, south of the Blue Licks. A French census of 1736 includes a listing of "Chaouanons, towards Carolina, two hundred men." Beckner suggests that this is a reference to Eskippakithiki, and would indicate a total popualtion of 800-1000, which would make it "the metropolis of Shawnee Kentucky." The "old fields" were several hundred acres of cleared land. The place was abandoned by the Shawnees in 1754, when they went to join the rest of the tribe in the Scioto Valley in preparation for war after the fall of Fort Necessity. <This is how it happened that Kentucky sent a body of troops to Braddock's Defeat, but on the French side.> Lucien Beckner, "Eskippakithiki: The Last Indian Town in Kentucky," THE FILSON CLUB HISTORY QUARTERLY 6 (1932):355-82

File: BCKNR.NT2



    Created: 8/2/2017 6:17:20 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20241-25566
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20241-25566


1932

Lucien Beckner, "Eskippakithiki: The Last Indian Town in Kentucky," THE FILSON CLUB HISTORY QUARTERLY 6 (1932) 355-82

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Fall of 1752 with four servants he went down the Ohio on a trading trip. To the Falls, where he found no one. Then back to Big Bone Lick, met a party of Shawnees who invited him to come to Eskippakithiki, promising good trading. Turning up the Kentucky, he unloaded his canoes at the town, and built a house with a stockade around it, and made ready for the fall and winter seasons. <He packed his trade goods at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, with hay made of English grass or, as we now call it, bluegrass. It had been imported to that rich limestone region from the farms of the motherland across the sea. When Findley threw this packing aside on the rich limestone land at Eskippakithiki, it generated and spread and was the first bluegrass to grow in Kentucky. Twenty-five years later, when the whites came to settle, they found no bluegrass in central Kentucky, save at Grassy Lick in Montgomery County and at Indian Old Fields.> On 1/28/1753 the town was invaded by a scalping party of Northern Indians from the St. Lawrence area, including a French Canadian and a renegade Dutchman named Philip Philips. They stole Findley's property, killed three of his assistants, and he with another servant, John Faulkner, fled back to PA. Lucien Beckner, "Eskippakithiki: The Last Indian Town in Kentucky," THE FILSON CLUB HISTORY QUARTERLY 6 (1932):372-74

File: BCKNR.NT2



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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
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    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20241-25567


1932

Lucien Beckner, "Eskippakithiki: The Last Indian Town in Kentucky," THE FILSON CLUB HISTORY QUARTERLY 6 (1932) 355-82

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JFINDLEY took DB directly to Eskippakithiki, where he had last been in Kentucky. The buildings they found burnt to the ground. They built a camp there. Lucien Beckner, "Eskippakithiki: The Last Indian Town in Kentucky," THE FILSON CLUB HISTORY QUARTERLY 6 (1932):355-82

File: BCKNR.NT2



    Created: 8/2/2017 6:19:09 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20241-25568
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20241-25568


1932

Lucien Beckner, "Eskippakithiki: The Last Indian Town in Kentucky," THE FILSON CLUB HISTORY QUARTERLY 6 (1932) 355-82

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Indian Old Fields (Eskippakithiki). John D. Shane interview with William Risk [Rich?]: <I heard one of the partners [in the group that took up the site], Gen [Marquis] Calmes, say the Old Fields were all covered with bluegrass when he first saw it [in 1775]. And when I first saw it, it was very high with grass, as high, some, as a horse's back, and with a head to it. . . . There were sprouts of white hiccory, and cherry tree, and black locust, and black walnut, all through the Old Field. . . . There were stumps, some off as high as a chair back, and around these stumps were trees, some of them would make five rail cuts. . . . Suppose some of the trees had been cut down to put up a white oak pole cabin that was . . . there and looked old when the partners were taking up the land. . . . It was known as the cabin on the white oak point. It is now on Leonard Beall's land, joining to Mrs. Goff's down on Howard's creek. The cabin was hardly one half mile from the gate posts. . . . Ben Combs [another partner] said he did not know who made it. . . . The posts were two, of black walnut, about as far apart as a gate would be. . . . The gate posts and cabin were then old when these men went to make the entries there. . . . A squaw ax, queensware, as all eye, gun barrel, which I think I saw, etc., ploughed up. . . . Down where Eastin's Mill is . . . there was a sign of corn hills there. It was down by Lulbegrud, as if the fence had all rotted down, and the place overgrown with weeds.> Beckner says that by his day, the only remaining sign of the town were a few mounds, rapidly being worn down by plowing. 11CC86 quoted in Lucien Beckner, "Eskippakithiki: The Last Indian Town in Kentucky," THE FILSON CLUB HISTORY QUARTERLY 6 (1932):377-79

File: BCKNR.NT2



    Created: 8/2/2017 6:19:50 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20241-25569
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20241-25569


1932

Lucien Beckner, "Eskippakithiki: The Last Indian Town in Kentucky," THE FILSON CLUB HISTORY QUARTERLY 6 (1932) 355-82

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Points out that when Boone surveys "the beautiful level of Kentucky" he is looking out over Indian Old Fields. Lucien Beckner, "Eskippakithiki: The Last Indian Town in Kentucky," THE FILSON CLUB HISTORY QUARTERLY 6 (1932):380

File: BCKNR.NT2



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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20241-25570
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