Thomas D. Clark, THE RAMPAGING FRONTIER: MANNERS AND HUMORS OF PIONEER DAYS IN THE SOUTH AND THE MIDDLE WEST (Indianapolis: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1939)

1939

Thomas D. Clark, THE RAMPAGING FRONTIER: MANNERS AND HUMORS OF PIONEER DAYS IN THE SOUTH AND THE MIDDLE WEST (Indianapolis: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1939)

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If a man were missing from his community in Virginia, it was said of him that "He has gone to hell or Kentucky." CLARKX:17

File: CLARK4.NT1



    Created: 8/2/2017 6:35:36 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20244-25577
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20244-25577


1939

Thomas D. Clark, THE RAMPAGING FRONTIER: MANNERS AND HUMORS OF PIONEER DAYS IN THE SOUTH AND THE MIDDLE WEST (Indianapolis: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1939)

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<Pioneer liar of the West was John Findley who took fiendish delight in exciting Daniel Boone's imagination to the breaking point by telling him of the large schools of fish which blocked the great falls of the Ohio, and of the quacking waterfowl which floated over the falls and were dashed to pieces on the rocks. According to Findley's carefully spun yarn, the sickening smell of carrion spread over a large area. These were exciting and gross misrepresentations, but so are most real-estate advertisements. When redbirds happily proclaimed corn-plainting time in the Carolinas in 1769, Daniel Boone shouldered his flintlock rifle and left Rebecca and the kids to shift as best they could with the corn patch, for he was off to visit Findley's land of eternal promise. Soon other families were left in a like plight by their head "b'ar-catchers" to root-pig-or-die until these restless sons could determine whether there was another side to the "big hill." Each party eventually returned to describe a land which made pikers of the Israelite land scouts. Tales of these first adventurers tempted even the most timid souls to pull up stakes and move westward. By late 1778 the great trail stretching from Cumberland Gap to the Ohio was becoming well-worn by the treading of ambitious families on their way to build new homes, and to found a new society.> CLARKX:18

File: CLARK4.NT1



    Created: 8/2/2017 6:36:13 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20244-25578
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20244-25578


1939

Thomas D. Clark, THE RAMPAGING FRONTIER: MANNERS AND HUMORS OF PIONEER DAYS IN THE SOUTH AND THE MIDDLE WEST (Indianapolis: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1939)

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<The KENTUCKY GAZETTE gave notice on May 17, 1796, that "On Saturday last, the Hunters rendezvoused at Irvine's Lick and produced SEVEN THOUSAND NINE HUNDRED AND FORTY-ONE Squirrels killed by them in one day." The hunting party which produced the most "tails and scalps" was richly rewarded with a choice quarter of beef.> CLARKX:31

File: CLARK4.NT1



    Created: 8/2/2017 6:42:37 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20244-25579
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20244-25579


1939

Thomas D. Clark, THE RAMPAGING FRONTIER: MANNERS AND HUMORS OF PIONEER DAYS IN THE SOUTH AND THE MIDDLE WEST (Indianapolis: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1939)

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Fiddling was very popular in Kentucky. Virginia reels were the favorite dances. Rip-roaring "toe smashers." Tunes: "Leather Britches," "Barbara Allen," "Old Joe Clark," "Fisherman's Hornpipe," "Fair Eleanor," "Skip-to-my-Lou," and hundreds of others -- many of which have been forgotten. <There was no excuse like a square dance for a boy to do a little experimental hugging and kissing of the maidens in the neighborhood. Perhaps, by rare good fortune and malicious intent, a backwoods beau cold confine his fondling activities to a single chosen one for a whole night of storming the puncheons.> <Buck-toothed, heavily-shod males dragged giggling straggly-haired and blushing gals around in a continuous whirl that would have made even the solar system dizzy. In such formations as were required in the reciprocal tunes of "Hog Drovers," "Old Sister Phoebe," and "Frog in the Middle Pond," danceers tripped in and out to meet their true lady loves, and to caress their willing lips.> CLARKX:260-262

File: CLARK4.NT1



    Created: 8/2/2017 6:43:19 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20244-25580
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20244-25580


1939

Thomas D. Clark, THE RAMPAGING FRONTIER: MANNERS AND HUMORS OF PIONEER DAYS IN THE SOUTH AND THE MIDDLE WEST (Indianapolis: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1939)

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<Ol' Kaintuck developed, along with the barbecue, the burgoo suppers or stews. No one knows when this wayward daughter of Virginia made this culinary and political departure from the established institutions of the Old Dominion. Burgoo was composed of a mixture of game, venison, domestic meats and vegetables in abundance. It was cooked in large pots or cauldrons until the whole mixture was a soup.> CLARKX:268

File: CLARK4.NT1



    Created: 8/2/2017 6:43:52 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20244-25581
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20244-25581


1939

Thomas D. Clark, THE RAMPAGING FRONTIER: MANNERS AND HUMORS OF PIONEER DAYS IN THE SOUTH AND THE MIDDLE WEST (Indianapolis: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1939)

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<No people ever had a higher regard for their women than the American frontiersmen. Women, in a sense, were trail breakers in the American West. Even the Indians realized this for when the women and children appeared west of the mountains they knew that white settlement would be permanent. Woman was symbolical of all that the backwoodsman wanted for his land; she was the necessary element of happiness in his life.> CLARKX:281

File: CLARK4.NT1



    Created: 8/2/2017 6:44:23 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20244-25582
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20244-25582


1939

Thomas D. Clark, THE RAMPAGING FRONTIER: MANNERS AND HUMORS OF PIONEER DAYS IN THE SOUTH AND THE MIDDLE WEST (Indianapolis: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1939)

Keywords
None.
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None.
<I first moved to the woods of Kentucky. I fought and repelled the savages, and hoped for repose. Game was abundant, and our path was prosperous, but soon I was molested by interlopers from every quarter. Again I retreated to the region of the Mississippi, but again these speculators and settlers followed me. Once more I withdrew to the licks of Missouri, and here at length I hoped to find rest. But I was still pursued, for I had not been two years at the licks before a damned Yankee came and settled down within a hundred miles of me!> THE WESTERN SUN, 6/14/1823 CLARKX:310

File: CLARK4.NT1



    Created: 8/2/2017 6:44:57 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20244-25583
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20244-25583














    

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