Charles McKnight, OUR WESTERN BORDER, ITS LIFE, FORAYS, SCOUTS, COMBATS, MASSACRES, RED CHIEFS, ADVENTURES, CAPTIVITIES, PIONEER WOMEN, ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO . . . (Philadelphia: J. C. McCurdy, 1876)

1876

Charles McKnight, OUR WESTERN BORDER, ITS LIFE, FORAYS, SCOUTS, COMBATS, MASSACRES, RED CHIEFS, ADVENTURES, CAPTIVITIES, PIONEER WOMEN, ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO . . . (Philadelphia: J. C. McCurdy, 1876)

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Quoting from Joseph Doddridge: <The division lines between those whose lands adjoined were generally made in an amicable manner before any survey was made by the parties concerned. In doing this they were guided mainly bly the tops of ridges and water courses. Hence, the greater number of farms in the western parts of Pennsylvania and Virginia bore a striking resemblance to an amphitheatre. The buildings occupied a low situation, and the tops of the surrounding hills were the boundaries of the tract to which the family mansion belonged. Our forefathers were fond of farms of this description, because, as they said, "Everything comes to the house down hill." . . . Our people had become so accustomed to the mode of "getting land for taking it up," that for a long time it was believed that the west side of the Ohio would ultimately be disposed of in the same way. Hence, almost the whole region between the Ohio and Muskingum was parceled out in "tomahawk improvements," but those so claiming were not satisfied with a single four hundred acre tract. Many owned a great number of tracts of the best land, and thus, in imagination, were as "wealthy as a South Sea dream." Some of these land jobbers did not content themselves with marking trees at the usual height witht he initials of their names, but climbed up the large beeches and cut the letters in their retentive bark, from twenty to forty feet from the ground. To enable them to identify these trees at a future period, they made marks on the trees around as references. At an early period of our settlements there was an inferior kind of land title, denominated a "tomahawk right." This was made by deadening a few trees near a spring, and marking on one or more of them the initials of the name of the person by whom the improvement was made. Rights acquired in this way were frequently bought and sold." (MCKNIGHT:187)

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    Created: 8/3/2017 9:41:26 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20299-25700
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20299-25700


1876

Charles McKnight, OUR WESTERN BORDER, ITS LIFE, FORAYS, SCOUTS, COMBATS, MASSACRES, RED CHIEFS, ADVENTURES, CAPTIVITIES, PIONEER WOMEN, ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO . . . (Philadelphia: J. C. McCurdy, 1876)

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"He here determined to sell his farm and remove with his family to the wilderness of Kentucky -- an astonsihing instance of hardihood, and we should even say indifference to his family, if it were not that his character has uniformly been represented as mild and humane as it was bold and fearless." (MCKNIGHT:259)

File: MKNGHT.NT1



    Created: 8/3/2017 9:43:25 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20299-25701
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20299-25701


1876

Charles McKnight, OUR WESTERN BORDER, ITS LIFE, FORAYS, SCOUTS, COMBATS, MASSACRES, RED CHIEFS, ADVENTURES, CAPTIVITIES, PIONEER WOMEN, ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO . . . (Philadelphia: J. C. McCurdy, 1876)

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"There is a hint in Mr. Marshall's history [Humphrey Marshall, THE HISTORY OF KENTUCKY], that the family affairs, which detained him in NOrth Carolina, were of an unpleasant character, but no explanation is given." (MCKNIGHT:267)

File: MKNGHT.NT1



    Created: 8/3/2017 9:45:18 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20299-25702
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20299-25702


1876

Charles McKnight, OUR WESTERN BORDER, ITS LIFE, FORAYS, SCOUTS, COMBATS, MASSACRES, RED CHIEFS, ADVENTURES, CAPTIVITIES, PIONEER WOMEN, ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO . . . (Philadelphia: J. C. McCurdy, 1876)

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In 1792 [sic] he dictated his brief and rather dry memoirs to some young gentleman who could write, and who garnished it with a few flourishes of rhetoric, which passed off upon the old woodsman as a precious morsel of eloquence. He was never more gratified than when he could sit and hear it read to him, by some one who was willing, at so small an expense, to gratify the harmless vanity of the kind-hearted old pioneer. He would listen with great earnestness, and occasionally rub his hands, smile and ejaculate, 'all true! -- every word true! -- not a lie in it!' He never spoke of himself unless particularly questioned; but this written account of his life was the Delilah of his imagination. The idea of 'seeing his name in print,' completely overcame the cold philosophy of his general manner, and he seemed to think it a masterpiece of composition." (MCKNIGHT:286)

File: MKNGHT.NT1



    Created: 8/3/2017 9:45:48 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20299-25703
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20299-25703














    

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