Wilbur S. Siebert, "Kentucky's Struggle with its Loyalist Proprietors," MHVR 7 (1920) 113-26

1920

Wilbur S. Siebert, "Kentucky's Struggle with its Loyalist Proprietors," MHVR 7 (1920) 113-26

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Rev. John Lythe, who was a member of the house of delegates of TRANSYLVANIA, and led the prayers for king and royal family at the session's end on Sunday, 5/27/1775, would be a Loyalist during the Revolution. Wilbur S. Siebert, "Kentucky's Struggle with its Loyalist Proprietors," MVHR 7 (1920):114

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    Created: 8/4/2017 12:34:35 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20329-25769
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20329-25769


1920

Wilbur S. Siebert, "Kentucky's Struggle with its Loyalist Proprietors," MHVR 7 (1920) 113-26

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Long Siege. The treaty negotiations: Hamilton had sent Lieutenant Antoine de Quindre and other French Canadians, with ammunition and French and British flags, to assist Blackfish in assembling a force of over 400 mostly Shawnees to proceed to Boonesborough, the "big fort." Arriving there on 9/7/1778, a messenger advanced to ask a parley over the letters which Hamilton had sent to Boone. <Negotiations lasted three days, on the last of which the principal men of the fort signed a treaty renouncing their allegiance to the United States and renewing their fealty to the king, on condition that the Indians, who outnumbered the garrison eleven to one, would withdraw immediately. But instead, the treacherous red men attempted to seize and detain the whites, though without success.> [This raises the interesting prospect that the Indians and the English were acting at cross-purposes here; that the negotiations were really inspired by Hamilton's desire to have the settlers declare for the crown, but that the Indians had their own reasons for wanting to expell these intruders from Kentucky. It also suggests that de Quindre may then not have applied all he knew about siege warfare to the ensuing struggle, if the Indians had thwarted his plans for the treaty at the last minute. There may also have been dissention among the Shawnees; one could imagine a difference of opinion between Blackfish, attached as he was to Boone, and Moluntha, who had lost a son to Boone on the Paint Lick expedition.] With the failure of the siege, the Shawnees broke into detachments that contented themselves with ravaging about other stations. Wilbur S. Siebert, "Kentucky's Struggle with its Loyalist Proprietors," MVHR 7 (1920):117

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    Created: 8/4/2017 12:35:29 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20329-25770
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20329-25770


1920

Wilbur S. Siebert, "Kentucky's Struggle with its Loyalist Proprietors," MHVR 7 (1920) 113-26

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Visitor to KY to Col. George Morgan, late 1780: <Should the English go there and offer them protection from the Indians, the greatest part will join.> Quoted in Wilbur S. Siebert, "Kentucky's Struggle with its Loyalist Proprietors," MVHR 7 (1920):118

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    Created: 8/4/2017 12:36:09 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20329-25771
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20329-25771


1920

Wilbur S. Siebert, "Kentucky's Struggle with its Loyalist Proprietors," MHVR 7 (1920) 113-26

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Captain Henry Bird, who led the raids on Kentucky in 1779 with the Girtys, was a Virginian. It was the policy of the British, acting out of Detroit, to employ Loyalists as the battle commanders in the war in the West. Wilbur S. Siebert, "Kentucky's Struggle with its Loyalist Proprietors," MVHR 7 (1920):119

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    Created: 8/4/2017 12:36:43 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20329-25772
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20329-25772


1920

Wilbur S. Siebert, "Kentucky's Struggle with its Loyalist Proprietors," MHVR 7 (1920) 113-26

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<There may be some justice in the criticism made at the time that widespread disaffection among the [Kentucky] settlers was responsible for the two stations [Ruddle's and Martin's]. At any rate, many of the pioneers are said to have moved into the interior rather than volunteer for offensive operations against the Indians and the tories.> Wilbur S. Siebert, "Kentucky's Struggle with its Loyalist Proprietors," MVHR 7 (1920):120

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    Created: 8/4/2017 12:37:12 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20329-25773
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20329-25773


1920

Wilbur S. Siebert, "Kentucky's Struggle with its Loyalist Proprietors," MHVR 7 (1920) 113-26

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<The Kentuckians suffered the cruelties of border warfare in greater degree than before, after the leadership of the tribes to the northward passed to those loyalists who owned lands in "Transylvania."> Wilbur S. Siebert, "Kentucky's Struggle with its Loyalist Proprietors," MVHR 7 (1920):122

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    Created: 8/4/2017 12:37:39 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20329-25774
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20329-25774


1920

Wilbur S. Siebert, "Kentucky's Struggle with its Loyalist Proprietors," MHVR 7 (1920) 113-26

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An escheating jury, of which DB was a member, met in Lexington in 5/1779, and rendered a verdict of forfeiture against Dr. John Connolly for joining the subjects of the king of his own free will. Connolly held the original patent for the lands at the Falls, the site of the city of Louisville. Interestingly, Connolly reappeared in Louisville after the war, in 1788, and in an interview with Col. Thomas Marshall and Judge George Muter revealed that Lord Dorchester (Sir Guy Carleton) was ready to aid the westerners by arming and paying for any force they would raise to wrest control of the Mississippi and New Orleans from the Spanish, and would send 5-10,000 men to join them. He said the same to James Wilkinson, who told him that the British were so disliked in Kentucky that he would be killed if his mission were discovered, so Connolly recrossed the river with an escort and fled. Wilbur S. Siebert, "Kentucky's Struggle with its Loyalist Proprietors," MVHR 7 (1920):123

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    Created: 8/4/2017 12:38:03 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20329-25775
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20329-25775














    

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