Thomas Julian Bryant, "Daniel Boone," Missouri Historical Review 6 (1911) 138-39

Thomas Julian Bryant, "Daniel Boone," Missouri Historical Review 6 (1911) 138-39

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[?] <About the year 1767, a party of explorers left their homes in North Carolina to visit the vast and almost wholly unknown region lying west of the Cumberland mountains. This party was led by Daniel Boone, who, even at that early period had established a well deserved reputation for dating, and a consumate knowledge of woodcraft. In this company were three brothers who bore the scriptural names of Shadrach Inman, Meshack Inman and Abendego Inman, the first of whom was a great grandfather of the writer herof. In due season they crossed the mountain ranges lying in their path of travel, and winter soon swept down upon them. For days they pushed forward through deep snows. They had little or no food during this time, for that which they had brought with them had been exhausted. They were therefore compelled to depend upon such game for their subsistence as they could bring down with their rifles, and killing game at that season of the year was not always easily accomplished. When they had arrived near the central part of the present state of Tennessee, and were encamped near a cave, probably the famous Nick-a-Jack cave, they were surprised and attacked one night by Indians. Being asleep at the time of the attack, and not having taken the precaution to post sentinels, nearly all the little band of adventurers were either killed or wounded. Among the slain was Meshack Inman. Among the wounded were Shadrach Inman and his brother, Abednego Inman. The former received a wound in the side from a spear, which weapon is still in existence and in the possession of one of his descendants. Abednego Inman received a wound in the forehead from an Indian tomahawk, leaving a scar which he carried for the remainder of his life, but surviving his wound, he placed himself in hiding in a large hollow tree, where he remained for nine days without food and with but little water, at the end of which period he was so far recovered as to be able to leave his strange habitation, and eventually and with extreme difficulty, to make his way back to his home in North Carolina. The company was thus broken up and dispersed, and the expedition abandoned. Among the number of those who excaped were Boone and Shadrach Inman. Boone on accoun t of his superior skill in woodcraft and knowledge of Indian wiles, escaped unharmed and returned hom. The Indians pursued him keenly through the dense forest, but like a fleeting shadow he eluded them, and led the few survivors of his little company safely back to their homes.> Thomas Julian Bryant, "Daniel Boone," MHR 6 (1911-12):138-39.

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    Created: 8/4/2017 4:17:49 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20348-25831
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20348-25831














    

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