Chester Raymond Young, ed. WESTWARD INTO KENTUCKY: THE NARRATIVE OF DANIEL TRABUE (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1981 [1827])

1981

Chester Raymond Young, ed. WESTWARD INTO KENTUCKY: THE NARRATIVE OF DANIEL TRABUE (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1981 [1827])

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3/1778, Daniel Trabue comes to KY: <Traveling along in Powls Valley where the Indians had broak up some people, seeing wast Desolate Cabbins I began to fee strange. We went on our Jurney and came in sight of the noted place called Cumberland Gap. We encamped all night (yet we was 3 or 4 MIle off) in a wast Cabin, and it was a Rainey blustry night. When Morning came the weather was clear, and after we ate our breakfast a little after sunrise we persued on our Jurney. When we got near to the Gap at a lorril branch where the indean war road [Warrior's Path] comes in the Kentucky road [Wilderness Road] (this indian Road Crosses the Gap at this place from the Cherekeys to the shoney town).> TRABUE:44

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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1981

Chester Raymond Young, ed. WESTWARD INTO KENTUCKY: THE NARRATIVE OF DANIEL TRABUE (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1981 [1827])

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Daniel Trabue on his way to KY, 3/1778: <I was Giting very fraid we would be Defeeted, and as we went on I talked some with Lucust again. He still talked the same way of killing several of them [Indians]. I for my part began to feel chikinhearted. I was afraid I should be killed in this Drary howling Wilderness but I never mentioned it to any one. I thought if we come in contact with the indians I would kiip behind or in the rear, but I thought that would not Do as I might be called a coward. I thought, "I wish I could have courrage like Lucust. I would be glad." Mr Lucaust was my main Dependence and a poor Dependence he was. I then wished I was back in Old Virginia.> When the have this engagement, Trabue is the most daring of all, and has to be restrained; Lucas [?] proved himself the coward. TRABUE:45

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20388-25906
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1981

Chester Raymond Young, ed. WESTWARD INTO KENTUCKY: THE NARRATIVE OF DANIEL TRABUE (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1981 [1827])

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On his way in to KY Trabue and his companions got into a small engagement with some Shawnees, and recovered their budgets with some small items. At Boonesborough <We sold the Indean plunder in the Fort on Munday at vandue and it Fetched Fifty shillings for each man. Lucust got no part of the plunder. The negro boy got his share. [see TRABUE:45] I bought some of this plunder, some nise wamp um and a shot bag and powder horn, etc.> TRABUE:47

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20388-25907
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1981

Chester Raymond Young, ed. WESTWARD INTO KENTUCKY: THE NARRATIVE OF DANIEL TRABUE (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1981 [1827])

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Long Siege Trabue's account, 2: <When the Indians Got their, a white man or half Breed came up to the fort with a white flag and called for Capt. Boon. Boon went out to the Indians and Returned to the fort, stateing that they could make peace with the Indeans, that the officers must all go to the indeans' camp and make a good peace, to which he (boone0 said he was willing and thought they could make a good peace. But the good Old Col. R. Calliway apposed it and wanted the endeans to come up to them. At length the indeans agreed that their Chiefs would come up near the fort gate, and our officers would go out their and meet them. And accordingly this was agreed to and they meet accordingly. Previously to their going our Col. Calloway told the people in the fort they must be Redy with their guns, if the indians useed any Violence to fire on them, etc. He also told them for the Woman to put on hats and hunting shirts and to appear as men and git up on the top of the walls and as they might appear as a great many men. And the woman did so and the men in the fort did also git on the walls and Cabins and showd to a good advantage. Their was about 75 white men in this fort and about 1,000 Indians around the fort. About 30 of the indian chiefs came up in about 50 yards of the Fort. Col. Boon with them, and our Officers -- about 15 -- went to them and they had a long talk. And the Indians made or pretend to make a firm peace with the white people and said we must shake hands for frindship, to which the white people agreed to Do. So they shook hands. The Idians then said, "Shake hands again," and so they Did. Now the Indians sayed, "Two indians must shake hands with one white man to make a Double or sure peace." At this time the Indians had hold of the white men's hands and held them. Col. Caleway objectd to this, but the other Indeans laid hold or tryed to lay hold of the other hand, but Col. Calleway was the first that Jurked away from them. But the indeans seized the men -- two indeans holt of one man or it was mostly the case -- and Did their best to hold them, but while the men and Indeans was scuffling the men from the fort agreable to Col. Calliway's Orders fired on them. They had a dredfull skuffil but our men all got in the fort safe. And the fire continud on boath sides after that.> TRABUE:58 continued

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20388-25908
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1981

Chester Raymond Young, ed. WESTWARD INTO KENTUCKY: THE NARRATIVE OF DANIEL TRABUE (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1981 [1827])

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Long Siege Trabue's account, 3: <Col. Calleway had made a wooden Cannon and took wagon tyre and wropt it, and the indeans had agreeable assembld several to gether at a Distance. Calleway loaded his Cannon and put in 20- or 30-once balls and fired at the Indeans. It made a large Report equal to a Cannon. The Indins squndered [scattered?] from that place much frighttd and it was thought several killed or wounded. This Cannon was fired the second time and burstd. The last time it was fired was at a grope of Indeans at a Distance and it made them skamper perdidiously. Whether they was hit with the bullits or whether it was the big loud Report it was uncertain, but one thing is a fact they never was seen in gropes right after that time. The indians some times would hollow aloud to our men and curse them and said, "Why Don't you shoot your big gun again?" Our men Did answer them, "Go many of you together and we will shoot it, but it is not worth while to shoot at one Indean when he is runing or Doging [dodging]."> They saw the Indians were digging the tunnell, and they began to countermine. <Capt. Holder, a large strong man, took big stones and cast them from the fort over the bank, expecting they might fall on some of the Indians. One of the woman of the fort said, "Don't Do so, Capt. It might hurt some of the Indians and they will be mad and have revenge for the same." And the Indeans and our men did almost meet under the fort a Digging. They could hear one another a Digins and when the indeans heard that, they thus quit, supposeing our people might or would put their big gun their. The siege continued for 10 Days and nights. Our men received but little Damage from the Indians' fire but it was thought their was several Indians killed.> TRABUE:58-59 continued

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    ID: 27-40-20388-25909
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1981

Chester Raymond Young, ed. WESTWARD INTO KENTUCKY: THE NARRATIVE OF DANIEL TRABUE (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1981 [1827])

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Long Siege Trabue's account, 5: The people of Logan's Fort prepare themselves for attack; there is a skirmish with attackers, and Logan is wounded; two days later they observed some people coming towards the fort; they thought they were Indians coming for the attack: <A the Distance of perhaps 300 yards I saw them a coming. We could not see how many as we Could not see only the front of them and they weare only in one file, what is called Indian file, one Deep. The men -- some of them -- said, "Dam you! Come on!" I heard the same thing repeated along the side of the fort next to wards boonsbureough wher they could see them. I actually felt better at this time than I had felt for these two Days. I told these men I thought I could soon make a good shoot and they allsaid they would try to make shore shoots. When they advanced nigh the fort some of the woman was the first that spoke out and said, "It is our boys." And as they come nigher we found out it was our boys shore enought. The fort gate was flung open. "Come in! Howdey, John Dick, Sam, harry, Tom, Jarret, Manifee." etc. Some a crying for Joy, some a laughing for Joy as they had [been] thinking their brother, husband, or relation was killed or prisoners with the Indeans was come now home alive. "Are you all alive? Are you all hear?" "Yes! Yes! Yes!" "We heard you was killd. Mr. Patton said the fort was taken." "No, it was not," they said. . . . These men told us all about it and said they was not supprised at Mr. Patton for thinking the fort was took, for the Indians at that time did rush up to the fort and did make the Dreadfullest ados that was ever heard off, and as it was in the night he could not tell from the Distance he was. These men informed us the Indians was Gone from Boonsbourough. Some gone tow wards the Cherrykees, some towards the shoneas' town. Some had gone toward Harrodsburgh and about fifty or sixty had come to this fort.> TRABUE:60-62

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20388-25910
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1981

Chester Raymond Young, ed. WESTWARD INTO KENTUCKY: THE NARRATIVE OF DANIEL TRABUE (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1981 [1827])

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Trabue's account, 1: <Colonel Richard Calleway brought up a Complaint against Capt. Daniel Boon, who is not Called Col. D. Boon. Their was a court Marshal called to try him. He was tryed at this time at Logan's fort. I was present at his Tryal. Col. Richard Calleway's Charge first [1] was that he (D. Boon) took out 27 Men to the blue licks to make salt, and that the Indians caught said Boon 10 Mile below these men on Licking, where he was a ketching Beaver, and they was not going towards these men. And Boon told them of these men and took the Indians to the men and told our men, "You are surrounded with indians and I have agreed with these Indians that you are to be used well; and you are to be prisoners of war and will be give up to the British officers at Detroyt, where you will be treated well." And these men against their consent had to go with the Indians to Detroyt. [2] And at Detroyt he (Boon) Did Bargan with the British Commander that he would give up all the people at Boonsbourough, and that they should be protected at Detroyt and live under British Jurisdiction. [3] And that when Boon came home he incouraged some Men to leave the fort to go away over the Ohio River. Boon went with them to an Indian town and that before they had got near the town they meet with some Indians and had a small fight with these indians was a comeing to boonsbourough. When the men saw them our men hurryed back with all their might and they only got to the fort a few hours before the Indean army got their. [4] And he (Boon_ was willing to take all our officers to the Indean camp to make peace out of sight of the fort. Col. Calloway says Boon was in favour of the british government, that all his conduct proved it.> TRABUE:63 continued

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    Created: 8/4/2017 7:46:03 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20388-25911
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1981

Chester Raymond Young, ed. WESTWARD INTO KENTUCKY: THE NARRATIVE OF DANIEL TRABUE (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1981 [1827])

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Trabue's account, 2: <Capt. Boon sayed the reason he give up these men at the blue licks was that the Indeans told him they was going to Boonsbourough to take the fort. Boon said he thought he would use some stratigem. He thought the fort was in bad order and the Indeans would take it easy. He (Boon) said he told the Indians the fort was very strong and too many men for them, that he was friendly to them (and the officers at Detroyt) and he would go and shew them some men -- to wit, 26 -- and he would go with them to Detroyt and these men also, and when they come to take Boonsbourough they must have more warriers than they now had. Boon said he told them all these tails to fool them. He also said he Did tell the Britesh officers he would be friendly to them and try to give up Boonsbourough but that he was a trying to fool them. Col. Calleway insisted he was [here, originally, "a tory," struck out and replaced with following 5 words] in favour of the britesh and he ought to be broak of his commission. Boon insested other wise. The court Marshal Deseded in Boon's favour and they at that time advanced Boon to a Major. Boon after that time appeared alwaise to be on the dise of this government. How ever, Col. Calleway and Capt. Ben Logan was not pleased about it.> TRABUE:63-64

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20388-25912
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1981

Chester Raymond Young, ed. WESTWARD INTO KENTUCKY: THE NARRATIVE OF DANIEL TRABUE (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1981 [1827])

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Trabue returns to his family home in Virginia in 1779: <After a while I Received a letter from my Brother James from Kentucky. He informed me Col. Richard Calleway would be at my Mother's in the spring of the year [1779], and he wished me not to come back to Ky. until Caleway would come and help him to pack out powder and lead. Col. Calleway come to my Mother's, went to the Legislater at Williamsburgh. He was a member from Kentucky. He promised to come to my Mother's when the assembly adjurned and I promised to go with him to Ky. Several of the neighbours insested on us that when Col. Calleway should Return from the assembly to let them know it as they wanted to see him, and several Did come and see Col. Calleway. They thought it was a great affair. Calleway Did tell them about their fort being besieged and his and boo's girles being taken by the Indians and how he persued the Indians and retook them. He also did tell them many things about the Indians and about Ky. Several of these neighbours Did buoy land warrents and got land in Ky.> TRABUE:67-68

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20388-25913
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1981

Chester Raymond Young, ed. WESTWARD INTO KENTUCKY: THE NARRATIVE OF DANIEL TRABUE (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1981 [1827])

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Hard Winter <The weather at last got so intencly cold that we had to lye by for several Days. The snow was fully knee Deep. Our meet that we had kept for our own eating faild. The Turkeys had got poore. They would set on the treers all Day and not fly Down. Many of them fell of[f] from their roosts and never more recovered. We could kill as many of them as we wanted but they weare too poore to eat. We made socks to go over our shews with Buffelo skins puting the wool inside and we had woollen gloves. But yet we could not stay away from our big fires, for if we Did shoot it was Imposible to load our Guns again.> <This hard winter began about the first of November 1779 and broak up the last of Feberary 1780. The turkeys was almost all dead. The buffeloes had got poore. People's cattle mostly Dead. No corn or but very little in the cuntry. The people was in great Distress. Many in the wilderness frostbit. Some Dead. Some eat of the dead cattle and horses. When the winter broak the men would go and kill the buffeloes and bring them home to eat but they was so poore. A number of people would be Taken sick and did actuly Die for the want of solid food. The most of the people had to go to the falls of Ohio for corn to plant which was brought Down the Ohia.> TRABUE:73-75

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20388-25914
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1981

Chester Raymond Young, ed. WESTWARD INTO KENTUCKY: THE NARRATIVE OF DANIEL TRABUE (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1981 [1827])

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<Some men had been to the indean towns and stole horses and had good suckcess in the adventer.> This refers to the expedition of William Whitley, Nehemiah Pore, and four others, all led by former prisoner Andrew Johnson, who in 5/1778, crossed the Ohio on rafts and captured seven horses, arriving home after two weeks. With this success in mind: <Alenander Montgomery and Simon Kenton asked me if I would go with them to the Indian town to steal horses, and I and G[eorge] Clark [sergeant in the militia company at Logan's Fort; not to be confused with George Rogers Clark] agreed to go. We 4 agreed to go to Scioto wher Chillicothey now is. We made preparration to go, got some nise halters made with grained raw Buffelow hides. We procured Deer lether lagons, parched corn Meal, and some Jirk. With 2 pair Mockinsons to each man, etc., our Guns and ammonition in the best Order, the next morning we was to start. . . . [His brother James returns from Boonesborough.] I told him that he knew the indeans had got my horse and we could go and steel horses from them. It was much better to Do that than to give my Mony for a horse. . . . James Replyed, "It is a Dangerous attempt. I am not willing for you to hazard your life in that way. One man's life is worth 100 horses and you have got mony a plenty that you brought from home with you." And said he, "I have als[o] got mony. A horse can be got when you want one to go home on." And he further said, "I have got a good horse. I will give you him, for," said he, "if any thing would happin to you how could I Ever see our Mother? She would say, 'James, how come you to lit Daniel go on such an errand'?" I concluded I would not go.> The other three go, steal horses, but were unable to get them across the stormy Ohio; waiting to cross, they were attacked by pursuing Shawnees. <The Indeans came on them and fired on them and badly wound Kenton and took him a prisoner, shot Montgomery at a Distance of 100 yards through the head as he was rideing from them in a Gallop and killed him. Mr. Clark run under some Drift wood and concealed himself till night; after night he typed some logs to gether, laid his gun and things on this raft and shoved it before him and swum over and made his escape. And he came home with this Melincholy knews. Mr. Kenton tarryed some time with the indeans. He got well of his wound and they sold him to the british officers at Detroyt and he run away from them and Came home.> TRABUE:54-55

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20388-25915
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1981

Chester Raymond Young, ed. WESTWARD INTO KENTUCKY: THE NARRATIVE OF DANIEL TRABUE (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1981 [1827])

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Long Siege Trabue's account, although he was not present, 1: <About this time Mr. Hincock, who had lived at Boonsbourrough [and] who had been a presoner with the shoney Indians and at Detroyt, made his escape and Came to boonsborough and informed them that the Indeans in a great army was a coming to take boonsborough; that Col. Daniel Boon was at Detroyt and had agreed with the british officers that he would come with the Indians, and that the fort should be give up, and that the people should be taken to Detroyt and live under the Juresdection of his graceous Majesty king Gorge III. Mr. Hencock stated that it was with Great Difficulty and hazard that he made his escape and he would not have risked his life it it had not been to give them this Notice. . . . Col. Daniel Boon Came to Boonsborough and told the same tale that Mr. Hencock had stated. Only sayed he was a Deceiving the Britesh officers and Indians, he was now come home to help his own people fight and they must make what preperration they could but the indeans would certainly be their in a few Days. But they would have time to go against Jest some indians that lived not far over the Ohio, and if a few men would go with him he would conduct them to this little Camp, and as these indians was rich in good horses and beaver fur they could go and make a great speck and Git back in good time to oppose the big army of Indians. Several men agreed emediately to go with Boon. Col. Richard Calliway apposed the plan with all his might but they went. If I remember about 20 Men went, and before they got half way to the place that they started to go to they meet with a company of Indians a coming towards boonsborough. They had a smart engagement with them and Returned to boonsborough with all thur Might, and they got their only a few hours before this great army of Indeans go their.> TRABUE:57 continued

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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1981

Chester Raymond Young, ed. WESTWARD INTO KENTUCKY: THE NARRATIVE OF DANIEL TRABUE (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1981 [1827])

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Long Siege Trabue's account, 4: <William Pattin, who lived at Boonesborough, was in the woods at the time the Indians came to this Fort; and when he came home the Indians was all round the fort, and he lay in ambush until the siege was almost over. He would go at a Distance on some high hill and view the Indians, and some times in the night he would approach tolerably near; and on the last night he stayed, the Indians made in the night a Dreadfull attack on the fort. They run up to the fort -- a large number of them -- with large fire brands or torches and made the Dreadfullest screams and hollowing that could be imagind. Mr. Pattin thought the Fort was taken. He came to our Fort -- to wit, logan's Fort -- and informed us Boonsborough was taken and he actuly Did hear the Indians killing the people in the fort. "They took it by storn," he said, tec. He heard the woman and Children and men also screaming when the indeans was killing them. We beleaved every word he told us as he was known to the people to be a man of truth.> TRABUE:59 continued

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20388-25917
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1981

Chester Raymond Young, ed. WESTWARD INTO KENTUCKY: THE NARRATIVE OF DANIEL TRABUE (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1981 [1827])

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<Captain Boone's court-martial arose from several factors, including the following: 1) false rumors of his disloyalty; 2)jealously of escaped prisoners of war (including William Hancock) who had seen the preferred treatment that the British afforded Boone during captivity; 3) Calloway's antagonism aroused by Boone's aggressive leadership and devious schemes in dalaying for three days the commencement of the Indian attack and in ending it satisfactorily; 4) the captain's success as an affront to the colonel's rank and position; and 5) intercolonial rivalry between Old Virginia and North Carolina -- the former places of residency of Calloway and Boone, respectively.> Chester Raymond Young, TRABUE:172n

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20388-25918
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1981

Chester Raymond Young, ed. WESTWARD INTO KENTUCKY: THE NARRATIVE OF DANIEL TRABUE (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1981 [1827])

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Chester Raymond Young comments: <Trabue's account remains the principal evidence for the court-martial of Boone. His recalling, forty-nine years after the event, of the specific charges against the captain is remarkable in view of the fact that he witnessed this trial as an eighteen-year-old lad during his first year on the Kentucky frontier -- a year that burned into his memory many startling happenings.> <Boone's promotion in rank [at the conclusion of this trial] was the means by which his fellow officers on the Kentucky frontier underscored their verdict of acquittal. The new grade that they gave the captain thus appropriately recognized his indispensable leadership during the recent siege of Boonesborough.> TRABUE:172n

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20388-25919
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1981

Chester Raymond Young, ed. WESTWARD INTO KENTUCKY: THE NARRATIVE OF DANIEL TRABUE (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1981 [1827])

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Fall 1779 corn sold for $30/bushel; four weeks later it could not be gotten for $50 of Beargrass Creek near Louisville; by 1/1780 the price stood at $165/bushel. Then in 5/1780 it was back down to $30/bushel. Chester Raymond Young in TRABUE:175n
FOOD Hard Winter <The most common illnesses observed by Dr. William Fleming during this winter in Kentucky were colds, fevers, and uncers on the throat, tongue, and glands. Some persons were seized with pains in the head, back, and chest, accompanied with a looseness of the bowels and the elimination of green or black bilious matter. The constant diet of corn bread and smoked, unsalted buffalo meat accounted for a good deal of these disorders, the doctor argued.> Chester Raymond Young in TRABUE:175n

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    Created: 8/4/2017 7:53:41 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20388-25920
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1981

Chester Raymond Young, ed. WESTWARD INTO KENTUCKY: THE NARRATIVE OF DANIEL TRABUE (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1981 [1827])

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An engagement near Harrodsburg: <Capt. R. May and the men went to the lick and went on the back side of a Gut and lay concealed, and after a while they saw the indeans coming. Their was 9 indeans. Capt. May said, "Boys, now Don't shoot until I give you some Itam [notice]. I will give the word. I want the endeans to come near to us." James Trabue says, "Boys, look! Don't you see that Indean their with a Naked belley? Don't none of you shoot at him. I want to kill him my self." While the men was a waiting for the indeans to get nearer and for Capt. May to give them the word they heard May's gun snap, and they looked at Capt. May and his gun was snaped. They all emedeately thought that Capt. May wanted to cheet and have the first fire to kill one Inden and they emedeately all fired. Brother James Trabue's white belly Indian fell and 2 or three more fell and was badly wounded. The indeans Jumpt to trees and cursed our men and said, "Dam son of bich, come hear." These wounded Indians appeared to crawl off or was helped off. They was at the edge of a cain break. They [the whites] got no indian.> TRABUE:52

File: TRABUE.NT2



    Created: 8/4/2017 7:54:18 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20388-25921
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20388-25921


1981

Chester Raymond Young, ed. WESTWARD INTO KENTUCKY: THE NARRATIVE OF DANIEL TRABUE (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1981 [1827])

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Trabue arrives in 4/1778: <The people in the fort was remarkable kind and hospetable to us with what they had. But I thought it was hard times -- no bred, no salt, no vegetables, no fruit of any kind, no Ardent sperrets, indeed nothing but meet. Yet we was well off to what we was in the wilderness before we got hear. The sunday before I got hear [e.g. "Before I got here that Sunday"] I was so hungry that if mony could have got it I think I would have gave $10 or 20 for one Diet. It was easter sunday and that was a noted Day in Old Virginia, and I thought, "If I was only their how I could eat. But I Don't Doubt but it was an advantage to us to suffer for food on the Road as the fair we now have will Do, as hunger is the best of sause."> TRABUE:47

File: TRABUE.NT2



    Created: 8/4/2017 7:55:05 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20388-25922
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20388-25922


1981

Chester Raymond Young, ed. WESTWARD INTO KENTUCKY: THE NARRATIVE OF DANIEL TRABUE (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1981 [1827])

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<They Generally took several Dogs to the woods. They was very beneficial in killing bears and Buffaloos. I thought the beautyfulest sight I ever Did see was to see a parsil of Dogs in full chase after a bair and they a yelping every Jump. They would soon stop him and then the hunters would shoot him. I soon got so that I could eat meat without salt very well.> TRABUE:48

File: TRABUE.NT2



    Created: 8/4/2017 7:55:49 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20388-25923
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20388-25923


1981

Chester Raymond Young, ed. WESTWARD INTO KENTUCKY: THE NARRATIVE OF DANIEL TRABUE (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1981 [1827])

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Conclusion of the Hard Winter, spring 1780. Trabue and some of his friends go out to a lick to hunt: <We sat out and looked sharp for game from the start and went to the licks, wached all Day and Did not see any thing to kill. When we was lying and waching the lick Mr. [Jeffrey] Davis said, "If we was only now in Old Virginia. At this very time their is preaching at Dupuy's Meeting House [in Trabue's old neighborhood]. So many prerty Girles their. If I was their I could go with some of them and eat a good Dinur, have something good to Drink. But hear we are. Nothing to eat in this Dreary Wilderness, and we Don't know when we shall if ever get anything to eat."> TRABUE:76

File: TRABUE.NT2



    Created: 8/4/2017 7:56:12 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20388-25924
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20388-25924


1981

Chester Raymond Young, ed. WESTWARD INTO KENTUCKY: THE NARRATIVE OF DANIEL TRABUE (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1981 [1827])

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Bowman campaign, 1779: <Col. Bowman Had Just Returned from a campaighn he had against one of the Indians' town. He made a broken trip of it, got some of our best men killed, and killed very few Indians, and returned home again.> TRABUE:68 WESTERNISM Tuckahoe was the name applied to easter Virginians to distinguish them from western Virgninans, called "Quo'he's." Chester Raymond Young, TRABUE:175n

File: TRABUE.NT2



    Created: 8/4/2017 7:56:47 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20388-25925
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20388-25925


1981

Chester Raymond Young, ed. WESTWARD INTO KENTUCKY: THE NARRATIVE OF DANIEL TRABUE (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1981 [1827])

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Long Siege Boone told Simon Kenton that he ordered the men in the bastion "to fire into the whole crowd if any thing happened." John H. James, Interview with Kenton, in James to Mann Butler, Urbana OH, 11/12/1835. 11C76[1



File: TRABUE.NT2



    Created: 8/4/2017 7:57:18 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20388-25926
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20388-25926


1981

Chester Raymond Young, ed. WESTWARD INTO KENTUCKY: THE NARRATIVE OF DANIEL TRABUE (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1981 [1827])

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Trabue talks to an Indian chief after Wayne's Treaty 1: <I had considerable talk with many of the Indean chiefs. One in perticular I will Mention. He was an Old Man. We had talked a few words together at Defferent times. We agreed to walk out some Distance and set Downa nd talk about the Despute bewteen the Indeans and white people. The chief said to me, "You big Captain. Me big Capt. too. What Do you want to take Indian land from them for?" Answer: we Did not want to take the land. Who told them we did? He said the british told thim so and the britesh told them they ought to fight for their land and kill the whites. I told him we alwaise bought their land and paid them for it and if any body had Ever been in the fought [fault] it was the british king. It was them that first made a settlement in America on their land -- if it was their land. But said I, "How come it to be your land? Who maid it and who give it to you?" He laughed and said the britesh told them it was their land and the Great spirret had made it for them.> continued

File: TRABUE2.NT1



    Created: 8/4/2017 7:59:17 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20388-25927
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20388-25927


1981

Chester Raymond Young, ed. WESTWARD INTO KENTUCKY: THE NARRATIVE OF DANIEL TRABUE (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1981 [1827])

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Trabue talks to an Indian chief after Wayne's Treaty 2: <I asked him if he beleaved that storry. He told me he would now tell me how he thought it was. He said he beleaved the Great Spirret made all the people -- the Indian and the white people. He made all the land and it was the Great sperrit's land. And it was rong for Indian or white man to say it was his land. This was a lie. "Now," said he, "if the Indian make house it it Indean's house. If he make corn field it is his, but the land is the Great Sperrit's. But," said he, "the white man he marke of[f] land in the woods and say it is his land." Said he, "This is a lie. It is not his land. It is the Great Sperrit's land." I said to him, "Don't you think the great sperrit made the land for the white people as well as the Indian?" He said, "Yes, but," said he, "he must not come too nigh to the Indean towns." I said to him, "We buoy your land and come so nigh you, you Come to see us and we let you have gun powder and lead and blankit. You got land enough left, and as the Great sperrit made the land for white folks as well as Indean, what make you Mad about it?" He said the truth was the british give them Rum and tell them the white people will never stop untell they take all the land from them. I told him the britesh tell lie; the white people want to make corn, and as their was a great many white people they could seell some more land. He said, "Yes;" he was willing. He said he had been to Philledelphia and he saw much people and he knew it was best to make peace. He said he had lost a number of his people who was killed in the war. He was now Determined to use his best influence to make peace.> TRABUE:143-144

File: TRABUE2.NT1



    Created: 8/4/2017 7:59:35 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20388-25928
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20388-25928














    

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