Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

1932

Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

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DB must have spent the winter of 1773-74 hunting to supply his family with meat and to obtain furs and pelts with which to purchase other necessary supplies. They were too late to raise a crop, so would have needed his work in the woods. ADDNGTN:30-31

File: ADDNGTN.NT1



    Created: 8/5/2017 12:01:52 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20433-26094
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20433-26094


1932

Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

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During the fall and winter of 1773-74 there were many indications of impending trouble with the Indians. Dunmore addressed a circular letter to the commandants of the frontier counties in which he stated that "hopes of a pacification can be no longer entertained," and ordered them to muster the militia and defend the country and to use their discretion in "providing extraordinary means for an extraordinary occasion." Efforts were made to place the frontier in a posture of defense by erecting and garrisoning forts, and by keeping out vigilant spies along the trails and streams of the wilderness. Captain Russell read Dunmore's circular letter on muster day in Castle's Wood on Saturday, June 25, 1774. The people responded by voting to build two forts on the Clinch, the work to begin at once. DB and Michael Stoner were selected to warn the surveyors in KY of impending Indian attack. ADDNGTN:31

File: ADDNGTN.NT1



    Created: 8/5/2017 12:03:32 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20433-26095
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20433-26095


1932

Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

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When Boone and Stoner returned from KY, Russell had already left with 275 riflemen for the Great Levels of Greenbrier, the place of rendezvous for the campaign against the Shawnees. Boone wanted to follow, but was instructed to stay in the Clinch and aid in its defense. The inhabitants were gathered in small forts, and dared not venture out to attend to their farms. ADDNGTN:32

File: ADDNGTN.NT1



    Created: 8/5/2017 12:04:01 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20433-26096
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20433-26096


1932

Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

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The conflict in the Clinch began in September 1774. 9/8: Samuel Lammey was taken prisoner on the North Fork of Holston; the families of John and Archibald Buchanan narrowly escaped; in the Rich Valley settlement, Indians fired on John Henry, wounding him mortally while he was standing in his own doorway -- he fled and the Indians captured his wife and three children. People fled to the forts; in Rich Valley they forted at Major Campbell's at Royal Oak, on the Middle Fork of Holston; great fears for the safety of Fort Christian, with only 8 men in defense. Scarcity of ammunition everywhere. 9/13: three Indians attacked one of Captain Smith's men less than a mile from Maiden Spring Station; soldiers returned fire and struck one Indian, the attacked man escaping; the trail of blood indicated this wounded Indian had fallen into a large cave; Campbell: "the pit is to be searched by means of ropes, with lights, as our men are anxious to get his scalp." ADDNGTN:33

File: ADDNGTN.NT1



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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20433-26097
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20433-26097


1932

Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

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During September, 1774, Boone led a number of scouting or spying expeditions, as the 9/22 record of Smith makes clear. ADDNGTN:33

File: ADDNGTN.NT1



    Created: 8/5/2017 12:04:39 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20433-26098
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20433-26098


1932

Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

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The Mingo chief Logan brought his search for revenge into the Clinch on Friday 9/23. His Indians appeared at Fort Blackmore, 17 miles beloe Ft. Moor, commanded by Boone. Logan's men captured two black slaves found outside the fort; the slaves were paraded to and from for a quarter of an hour in full view of the fort in an attempt to draw out the men; finally, after killing a large number of horses and cattle, the Indians left, leaving a painted war club as a token of defiance. From Blackmore, Logan and his men hurried south, through Mocassin Gap, to the neighborhood of King's Mill, on Reedy Creek, near the site of present Kingsport, TN, where, on Saturday, 9/24, he led the murder of the Roberts family, and captured one of the sons. There he left the famous letter, written in "gunpowder ink" as well as another painted war club. ADDNGTN:34,54

File: ADDNGTN.NT1



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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20433-26099
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1932

Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

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On 9/29 Logan was at Moore's Station, where Boone was in command. Just after sunset, three men from the fort visited a pigeon trap, about 300 yards distant, in plain view of the fort. They were fired upon by Indians, and John Duncan, one of the three, was killed and scalped, and a war club left beside his mangled body. On hearing the shots, Boone and his men ran from the fort, but the Indians made their escape. Major Campbell wrote: "Mr. Boone also informs that the Indians have been frequent about Blackmore's since the negroes were taken, and Captain Looney, having only eleven men, cannot venture to go in pursuit of them. Mr. Boone has sent me the war club that was left; it is different from that left at Blackmore's and Boone thinks it is the Cherokees who are annoying us now." Catherine Porter, daughter of Patrick Porter (emigrant from the Yadkin) told her children the story of finding Indian war clubs at the spring near the fort. She had gone for water; gathered the clubs in her apron, and ran for the fort calling as loud as she could. Father said to her: <Well, Kate, you have had a powerful fight with the Indians and took their war clubs from them.> ADDNGTN:34,55

File: ADDNGTN.NT1



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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20433-26100
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1932

Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

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10/9: Logan seems to have divided his force, for on this day there were simultaneous attacks on Evan Shelby's Fort at Bristol, TN and Fort Blackmore at the mouth of Stony Creek. Logan led the attack at Bristol in person, where the Indians captured a slave woman, questioned her about the strength of the fort; but she managed to escape and get back to the fort. Major Campbell wrote, 10/9, that she declared that the leader of the band was a large man who "talked good English." <Some think Capt. John Logan is about yet; others, that it is Will Emery, the half-breed Cherokee, as he was mentioned in Shoat's deposition as being out, and he is known for some time past to be in the Shawanoese interest; he was interpreter when Donelson ran the line, and it was he who robbed Knox and Scaggs.> The attack on Blackmore's Fort was no more successful. The Indians sliently crept along the bank of the river, hidden from view, planning to make a sudden rush on the fort's open gate. But they were seen by Dale Carter who shouted "Murder! Murder!" which warned the men inside, who quickly closed the gate. ADDNGTN:35

File: ADDNGTN.NT1



    Created: 8/5/2017 12:05:49 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20433-26101
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20433-26101


1932

Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

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Shortly after the attack on Blackmore on 10/9, Boone and Captain Smith, with a force of 30 men, arrived and went out in search of the Indians. They found plenty of sign, but could not engage the enemy. Captain Looney, the commander of Fort Blackmore, was absent at the time of the attack on 10/9. He had returned to his home near Kingsport, where his family were, after he heard the reports of the massacre of the Roberts family. His absence caused considerably dissatisfaction with him at the fort. The residents of Blackmore wanted a military leader who lived nearby. They petitioned Col. William Preston, the highest military officer in Fincastle County, to make Boone a captain and put him in charge. (See Smith letter 10/13.) Their petition was unamiously approved by the settlers at Castle's Wood, Boone's neighbors. DB was well known in the forts. He often stopped in passing up and down the Clinch. He had hurried to the aid of Blackwell when the negroes were captured and when Carter was killed. His services inspired great confidence in him throughout the valley. Thwaites calls him "the hero of Clinch Valley." Col. Preston had been furnished by Gov. Dunmore with blank commissions, and at once promoted Boone, placing him in charge of the forts of the lower Clinch: Blackmore's, Moore's, Cowan's. Prior to this time Boone had never ranked above lieutenant. ADDNGTN:36,60-61

File: ADDNGTN.NT1



    Created: 8/5/2017 12:06:07 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20433-26102
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20433-26102


1932

Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

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Campbell, 11/21/1774, wrote to Col. Preston: <Upon the first intelligence of peace being concluded, I wrote to the officers on duty to discharge the whole of the militia except fifteen at Blackmores and the like number at Mockinson Gap.> 11/20/1774 the men under Boone's command were discharged from the militia service. With the close of the war, Boone "dropped back into the semi-civil, semi-military life peculiar to a border infested by savages." ADDNGTN:37,73

File: ADDNGTN.NT1



    Created: 8/5/2017 12:06:29 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20433-26103
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20433-26103


1932

Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

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Fort Blackmore 1: At the time of DB's remove from NC for KY, via the Clinch, a number of other North Carolinians were removing for the Clinch itself. Some of this interest came from David Cox, a young man who was a hunting companion of Boone's. On one of these expeditions he was with Boone to the locality of Elizabethton TN (Sycamore Shoals); here he left the party and went northward, passing through Big Moccasin Gap into present Scott County, VA. Traveling up the Clinch, he found a place he liked at the mouth of Stony Creek: an ancient floodplain on the north bank surrounded by dense forests abounding in game, the river teeming with fish. He set up a camp, but was captured by Indians; held in captivity for 2-4 years. Escaped, returned to NC where he told about the area. He helped to organize a migration there about 1773, that included a number of Blackmore families; founded a settlement at the mouth of Stony Creek. At about the same time a number of other Yadkin men removed to Castle's Woods: Patrick Porter and some of his kinsmen. They founded "Snoddy's Fort," which must have been in the area of Moore's Fort, and in fact may be the same place. In 1774 they moved down to Fort Blackmore. ADDNGTN:43-45

File: ADDNGTN.NT1



    Created: 8/5/2017 12:06:59 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20433-26104
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1932

Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

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Fort Blackmore 2: The fort was built on the river bank, gate facing the river on the south, and a spring. On the south bank of the river, across from the fort, limestone cliffs rose from the narrow channel of the river; these were frequently used by the Indians in efforts to spy on the fort, and fire down on it. On the north, a series of "hummocky" river hills sloped down to the rear of the fort. Description of the fort, in a letter of William Russell to Col. Preston: "small fortification they have erected." Rectangular, cabins, stockades, bastions. Sides formed by rows of cabins, each separated from the other by log partitions. Cabin walls on the outside were 10 or 12 feet high, the slope of the roofs being turned wholly to the inside. Clapboards of the rood held in place by rocks; cabins with dirt floors; bations in the corners; a large folding gate, of thick slabs; spaces between cabins filled by palisades of logs, deeply set into the ground and sharpened at the top; entire fort built with a single nail or iron spike. Horses and cattle kept within the enclosure at night; horses often stolen by the Indians. Located on the land of John Blackmore, thus the name. This was the extreme frontier of Virginia -- so exposed to attacks that often the settlers dared not venture to cultivate their crops during the summer. They lived in their own cabins in the winter, when they made improvements to their places; on the approach of warm weather they secured themselves in the fort. Thus they dreaded the approach of spring and summer. Warm weather in late autumn might mean an Indian attack; thus these warm, smoky periods, were called "Indian summer." ADDNGTN:48-49

File: ADDNGTN.NT1



    Created: 8/5/2017 12:07:25 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20433-26105
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20433-26105


1932

Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

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These valleys were not the home of any particular nation of Indians; like Kentucky, they were contested by hunters of all tribes. ADDNGTN:49

File: ADDNGTN.NT1



    Created: 8/5/2017 12:07:51 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20433-26106
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20433-26106


1932

Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

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Logan: Said he had two souls, one good, the other bad; after the massacre of his family on Yellow Creek, his desire to avenge the death of his kinsmen gave vent to the bad soul. The whole frontier was thrown into a panic. His "gunpowder ink" letter: <To Captain Cresap -- What did you kill my people on Yellow Creek for? The white people killed my kin at Coneestoga a great while ago, & I thought nothing of that But you killed my kin again on Yellow Creek and took my cousin prisoner then I thought I must kill too; and I have been three times to war since but the Indians is not Angry only myself. July 21st day. Captain John Logan.> At the end of the war, Logan's speech: <I appeal to any white man to say if ever he entered Logan's cabin hungry and he gave him not meat; if ever he came cold and naken and he clothed him not? During the course of the last long and bloody war, Logan remained idle in his camp, an advocate for peace. Such was my love for the whites that my countrymen pointed as I passed and said, "Logan is the friend of the white man." I had even thought to have lived with you, but for the injuries of one man. Colonel Cresap, the last spring in cold blood and unprovoked, murdered all the relations of Logan not even sparing my women and children. There runs not a drop of my blood in the veins of any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it. I have killed many. I have fully glutted my vengeance. For my country I rejoice at the beams of peace; but do not harbor a thought that mine is the joy of fear. Logan never felt fear. He will not turn on his heel to save his life. Who is there to mourn for Logan? Not one.> ADDNGTN:50,52,73

File: ADDNGTN.NT1



    Created: 8/5/2017 12:08:12 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20433-26107
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1932

Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

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William Russell to William Preston, 5/7/1774: <Upon my return from Williamsburg, finding the upper settlers on Clich River had total evacuated their plantations, I thought it my duty, agreeable to your instructions, to employ four men as runners in the service of the country, in hopes thereby to prevail on the remainder of the inhabitants to desist from so ruinous an undertaking.> ADDNGTN:50

File: ADDNGTN.NT1



    Created: 8/5/2017 12:08:39 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20433-26108
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20433-26108


1932

Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

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Crabtree's attack: The behavior of the squaw and other Indian man who survived the attack led people to believe that the Cherokees would seek revenge. At least some Cherokees participated in the ensuing war, although Oconostota and Little Carpenter opposed it. ADDNGTN:51

File: ADDNGTN.NT1



    Created: 8/5/2017 12:09:08 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20433-26109
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1932

Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

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The party would have passed from Castle's Wood down the Clinch, known as the Old Fincastle Road: down the ridge dividing the valleys of Sinking Creek and Clinch River to Powers Hill and Fall Creek; crossed Clinch at Hunter's Ford (Osborne Fort); past Fort Blackmore; through Rye Cove; united with the Kentucky Path in Stock Creek Valley. The Kentucky Path in Scott County VA itself: down Reedy Creek to Kingsport; ford just above Holston Bridge; north over Little Pine Mountain; through Moccasin Gap; up Little Mosscain Valley; over the divide to Troublesome Creek (on which it was a difficult trip); to Speer's Ferry across the Chinch River at the site of Clinchport; Big Stock Creek to Natural Tunnel; over Horton's Summit to Little Flat Lick, one of the best known places on the trace, now the site of Duffield; over Powell's Mountain at Kane's Gap, and into Powell's Valley near the head of Wallen's Creek; or, by way of Pattonsville to Stickleyville. ADDNGTN:17-28


File: ADDNGTN.NT1



    Created: 8/5/2017 12:09:47 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20433-26110
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1932

Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

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This is said to have taken place during the winter following KENTUCKREMOVE1, and is a story told by Boone. A man named Green and his brother-in-law, from the area of Fort Blackmore, were hunting companions. They went into the mountains hunting, erected a shelter, and laid up a store of jerked bear meat. One day when Green was alone, his companion absent on the chase, he shot a large bear in a sink hole; but Green slipped in the snow, and fell into the hole, where the bear, enraged with pain, horribly mangled the man, completly destroying one side of his face, including his eye. The bear finally dragged itself off, leaving Green for dead. His brother-in-law eventually found him, and took him to the cabin. Thinking it impossible for Green to recover, on the pretense of hunting, the man abandoned poor Green to his fate. When he returned to the settlements, he reported that Green had been killed. In the cabin, the little fire eventually died away from his inability to provide fuel. Digging with his knife, he made a hole, lined it with wild turkey feathers saved from a plucking, and made himself a warm bed. Fastening his knife to a stick, he was able to cut down bits of dried meat from the bear handing over his head, and so he managed to survive and gradually recovered. In the spring, a party, including Boone and the brother-in-law, left the Clinch for the hunter's cabin, thinking to bury Green. To their astonishment, they met him walking slowly towards home. The party was so indignant that they could scarcely refrain from laying violent hands on the brother in law. Green, though horribly disfigured, lived many years. Draper Mss, cited in ADDNGTN:68-69

File: ADDNGTN.NT1



    Created: 8/5/2017 12:10:35 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20433-26111
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1932

Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

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Arthur Campbell to William Preston, 10/6/1774: On fears of attacks: <The people in the Wolf-Hill Settlement will have the Indians to come up the Valley & North fork, opposite to them, and then make a Right-Angle to their habitations, they people on ye. South Fork will have the Enemy, to steal slyly up the Iron Mountain, and make one Grand attack on the Head of Holston and Sweep the River down before them; the Head of New River will have it, that the Cherokees will fetch a Compass, round Wattago Settlement, and come down New River, on a partuclar Search for their scalps. The Rich-Valley and North fork people will ahve Sandy the dangerous pass. for proof of which they quote former and recent instances; Stalnaker & Henry's Family being carried out the same road. You may thus see what a task one would have to remove every ones fears; I wish I could be instrumental in defending from real ones, imaginary dangers would give me less anxiety.> 3QQ115, quoted in ADDNGTN:65

File: ADDNGTN.NT1



    Created: 8/5/2017 12:11:06 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20433-26112
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1932

Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

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During the summer and fall of 1774 Indians were so frequently seen in the area of Fort Blackmore that it was considered under siege. Supplies and ammunition were low, and hunters could not even go out for game. ADDNGTN:51-52

File: ADDNGTN.NT1



    Created: 8/5/2017 12:11:33 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20433-26113
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1932

Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

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Capt. James Looney was in command of Fort Blackmore after its original commander, James Thompson, left for Point Pleasant in September. But by 10/6 Looney had returned home, and the fort was commanded by Sgt. Moore. Boone was then placed in general command of all three of the lower forts. ADDNGTN:60

File: ADDNGTN.NT1



    Created: 8/5/2017 12:12:51 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20433-26114
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1932

Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

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Arthur Campbell to William Preston, 10/6/1774. List of forts: Blackmores 16 men Sgt Moore Moores 20 men Boone 20 miles Russells 20 men Poage 4 miles Glade Hollow 15 men John Dunken 12 Elk Garden 18 men John Kinkead 14 Maiden Springs 5 men Joseph Craven 23 Whittons, Big Crab Orchard 3 men Ensign Campbell 12 3QQ116 quoted in ADDNGTN:66

File: ADDNGTN.NT1



    Created: 8/5/2017 12:13:17 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20433-26115
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1932

Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

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Campbell to Preston, 10/12/1774: <Since I began this, I am mortified with the sight of a family flying by. If ammunition does not come soon, I will have no argument that will have any force to detain them.> Quoted in ADDNGTN:66

File: ADDNGTN.NT1



    Created: 8/5/2017 12:13:39 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20433-26116
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1932

Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

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Although 40 years old, DB was the most active commander in the valley of the Clinch. ADDNGTN:72

File: ADDNGTN.NT1



    Created: 8/5/2017 12:13:58 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20433-26117
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1932

Robert M. Addington, HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, VIRGINIA (Kingsport, Tennessee: privately printed, 1932)

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Boone arrived back on the Clinch from KY, and in the first week of September took his family to KY. They passed down the Clinch, by Blackmore, through Rye Cove, to the Kentucky Trace at some point in Stock Creek Valley. ADDNGTN:73

File: ADDNGTN.NT1



    Created: 8/5/2017 12:14:26 AM
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    ID: 27-40-20433-26118
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