Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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Salt licks were one of the most important features of Kentucky to the pioneers. The most famous of the licks were the Big Bone, the two Blue Licks, and Drennon's Lick, but there were several others of prominence. So extensive was the output of salt that James Wilkinson built up a thriving trade in it as well as tobacco. Salt makers drilled a shallow well near the licks and drained off the saline solution, which they boiled in order to crystalize the saline particles. 500-600 gallons of water were required to yield one bushel of salt. Drillers of salt wells frequently brought up a dark-colored, greasy fluid which they considered worthless -- petroleum -- and their drilling was abandoned. Wells in the neighborhood of the Great Kanawha overflowed and covered the river with a greasy scum, and it was called "Old Greasy." CLARK2:10

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20542-26679
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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<Realizing that Washington relied upon hardy frontiersmen for fighting strength, Sir Guy Carlton encouraged British officials in the West to send their Indian allies against the whites. The English anticipated that once word reached Washington's army that frontier homes were being attacked, there would be a wholesale desertion from the American army. The guiding spirit behind the British movement in the West was Lieutenant Governor Hamilton who was stationed at Detroit. Hamilton had acquired a malodorous reputation as a "ha'r buyer." It was said in Kentucky that Governor Hamilton called in thousands of Indians and distributed among them scalping knives, tomahawks, and bloody belts to encourage them to wipe out the Kentucky settlements. That this state of affairs existed is doubtful, but at least the rumor stimulated action in Kentucky.> CLARK2:66-67

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20542-26680
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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DB adopted into the Shawnee tribe. <In this role the Kentuckian was highly successful. His knowledge of Indian habits equipped him for coming events. As a contestant in shooting matches, Boone was always careful to be the poorer shot. In tests of physical strength he was always careful to be the weaker of the contestants, thereby incurring no jealousy on the part of his captors. In fact, Boone made such a good Indian that he was initiated into the tribe and given all the rights thereto, including a squaw and a dog. Perhaps Daniel Boone would have enjoyed living with the Indians for a longer time had he not overheard their plans to attack Boonesborough.> Escapes on 6/16/1778 and makes it to Boonesborough. <At Boonesborough the returned commander received a cool welcome, for some of the occupants of the fort were doubtful of his loyalty. With his plucked head and other Indian appearances, Boone was doubtless suspected of being the forerunner of a savage attack. Later, members of the party within the fort agitated the question of Boone's guilt to such an extent that he was placed on trial, charged with conspiracy and treason.> CLARK2:77-78

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    ID: 27-40-20542-26681
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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Hard winter of 1779-80: During the previous summer settlers had failed to produce sufficient crops, even for a mild winter. But this one was so severe that domestic animals froze and wild game starved to death in the woods, and the lack of food almost destroyed the Kentucky settlements. And to make things even worse, the spring brought an inundation of new settlers. CLARK2:80 BLUELICKS KENTUCKWAR The massacre of the Moravian Indians at the Ohio village of Gnadenhutten by David Williamson of PA in 3/1782 set the terms for the Blue Licks battle. The battle site was devoid of cover, because of the sparse growth of scrub oak, cedar, hickory and maple; moreover the buffalo had browsed down the shrubbery for some considerable area about the salt licks; as DB son-n-law Joseph Scholl explained, their appetites sharpened by the salt, the buffalo eat every green thing in site. DB led the Kentuckians' frontal attack. Hugh McGary was made the scapegoat of the fiasco. The Indian losses are unknown. CLARK2:82-84

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    ID: 27-40-20542-26682
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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Haphazard system of surveying. Over 900 claims totalling 560,000 acres had been registered by 1/1776 under the terms of the Transylvania grant. Kentucky did not assume authority until 7/4/1776 by which time the land system was in "a rueful state of confusion." <In 1777 the general assembly passed a law stipulating that all persons claiming land in Kentucky prior to June 24, 1776, were entitled to a grant of 400 acres and premption rights to an additional 1,000 acres, provided the land were occupied before January of that year. In 1779 the Virginia Assembly passed a general land law which followed the outline of the one passed in 1777. This new statute permitted individual claimants 400 acres at $40,00 per hundred, provided they had built a cabin and grown a crop of corn on the claim prior to January 1, 1778.> Most of the subsequent KY land disputes could have been averted by an orderly system of original surveys. All claimants were reuired to register their surveys with the land court through the purchase of land warrants. No supervision of private surveys. Francois Michaux, writing of his KY trip in 1802: "incertitude of property is an inexhaustible source of tedious and expensive lawsuits which serve to enrich the professional gentlemen of the country." CLARK2:87-90

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    ID: 27-40-20542-26683
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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Moccasins: no article of frontier clothing more important. Required only pegging awls and rolls of "whang" leather with which to bind the seams. Ideal footwear, since the hunter could walk all day without cramping his feet between stiff soles and uppers. Ordinarily uppers were long enough to be tied about the wearer's legs to keep out sticks, pebbles, and snow. For winter, they were made with the hair side turned in to keep the feet warm, or simply stuffed with hair or wool. Despite thier comfort, however, <the pioneer's feet were the source of nine tenths of his suffering, for the disease of "scald feet" was prevalent, and often its victims were disabled for several days by tender, aching feet.> And <nearly every pioneer was victim sooner or later of rheumatic trougles, which came as the result of tramping day after day with his feet encased in soggy, wet moccasins. Leather used in making moccasins was porous, and, of course, not waterproof; hence the wearer's feet were wet continually. The pioneers baked their feet before open fires at night as their only relief from rheumatism.> CLARK2:97

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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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Long Siege CLARK2:98

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    Created: 8/8/2017 11:02:45 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20542-26685
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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At weddings and other social occasions <the musicians, led always by the fiddler, struck up a merry tune for the dance, which lasted for hours. A unique dance was developed on the frontier in the well known "square dance," and the Virginia reel was a favorite in some communities. Fiddlers confined their selections to favorite frontier "breakdown" tunes such as "Billy in the Low Ground," "Fisher's Horn Pipe," and "Barbara Allen," tunes which still enliven dance parties of many Kentucky communities.> CLARK2:101

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    Created: 8/8/2017 11:03:37 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20542-26686
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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Harrodstown settlers attacked 7/20/1774: <This attack was to interrupt permanent western settlement for more than a year. Undoubtedly harrod would have eventually suceeded with his undertaking, however, had it not been for the war provoked by Governor Dunmore and his agents. The defeat of the Indians in the French and Indian War and in Pontiac's Conspiracy, together with the white man's terms of peace at Stanwix and Hard Labor, had only increased ill feeling on the part of the Indians frequenting the Kentucky country. White settlers themselves were likewise at fault. It is true tht many settlers along the exposed Virginia and Pennsylvania frontier experienced atrocities committed by Indians. But many were the fantastic stories of gruesome crimes committed by the savages, repeated around frontier firesides for the purpose of stirring white sentiment against the Indians. This propaganda resulted in a determination to rid the country of the Indian menace, regardless of moral considerations. Not only were the whites stirred by propaganda, but likewise the Indians. A story that a backwoodsman had murdered an Indian and his squaw because he believed they had killed his favorite dog, and a tale of the complete annihilation of men, women, and children in the whites' attack upon the savages caused the Indians to become more hostile than ever.> CLARK2:54

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    Created: 8/8/2017 11:04:18 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20542-26687
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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Rivers were seen as indispensable to free ingress into and egress out of the west. Springs were as important in determining the location of settlements. James Harrod established his settlement on a hillside near Boiling Springs, which guaranteed a bountiful supply of fresh water. Boonesborough enjoyed the fresh supply of the Kentucky River. Springs were found in the neighborhood of McClelland's Station (Georgetown), Bryan's Station, and Lexington. Water was virually as important to the early settlers as food. CLARK2:18-19

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20542-26688
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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Rivers. The Ohio River was as influential as the Wilderness Trail in pointing the way for settlers, who followed its course to the mouth of the Licking. The pioneers of the western country then looked back on the Ohio as the great commercial artery for their settlements. The failure of the federal government to secure the complete freedom of river transport from Spain caused many Kentuckians to favor complete independence for their state. The chief river points were Limestone/Maysville, Carrollton, Covington, Louisville, Paducah, and Hickman. CLARK2:20-22

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    Created: 8/8/2017 11:05:44 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20542-26689
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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English hunters, traders, and trappers of frontier Virginia and Pennsylvania had become fairly well informed about the extent and topography of the interior by the 1730s. Woodsmen of the Blue Ridge and Allegheny were the first to view the Appalachian trough formed by these parallel ranges, which extends virtually unbroken from the Potomac pass at Harper's Ferry to the Cumberland Gap, and is crossed and recrossed by numerous streams and fertile valleys. At the southern end of this great valley the Tennesse River gorge leads off to the southwest into the plains of northern Alabama and thence through central and western Tennessee into Kentucky. This was the direct route for emigrants coming from the Carolinas, Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania by way of Cumberland Gap to Kentucky. Others followed the Tennessee River to its mouth on the Ohio and thence up the Cumberland River to the environs of present-day Nashville. CLARK2:29-30

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    Created: 8/8/2017 11:06:15 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20542-26690
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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Both English and French knew that there was to the west of the Appalachian ranges a long, rolling stretch of fertile territory, open to settlement and exploitation by any group of settlers bold enough to take and hold it. It had rivers, streams, springs, salt licks, and game in abundance. Indians used it as a hunting ground, but lived either north of the Ohio or south of the Cumberland. CLARK2:31

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    Created: 8/8/2017 11:06:47 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20542-26691
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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The headwaters of the New, Stauton, James, Clinch, Holston, Potomac, Yadkin, and Catawba are all connected, directly or indirectly, by easily passable gaps. Indians were familiar with these headstreams, as evidenced by numerous trails through these valleys. CLARK2:27

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    Created: 8/8/2017 11:07:19 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20542-26692
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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Displeasure with the company prompted George Rogers Clark to call a meeting at Harrodsburg, 6/6/1776, to discuss the western situation. Clark was delayed, and the settlers proceeded to elect him and Gabriel Jones to the Virginia Assembly in order to request the extension of Virginia authority to the West. But what Clark had in mind was Virginia's recognition of Kentucky as an independent colony. When they reached the Assembly they were denied seats, but the body created Kentucky county out of the original western county of Fincastle on 12/31/1776. This sounded the death knell of the Transylvania Company, reenforcing the act of the previous July which instructed the settlers to hold their lands without paying quitrents. Henderson was, 11/4/1778, given 200,000 acres between the Ohio and the Green, as compensation for opening Kentucky to general settlement. CLARK2:63-65

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    Created: 8/8/2017 11:07:59 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20542-26693
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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The company disregarded the character of the settlers when they framed their "dictatorial scheme of government." CLARK2:62-63

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    Created: 8/8/2017 11:08:22 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20542-26694
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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Gov. Margin of NC denounced the project as one led by "land pyrates." CLARK2:61

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    Created: 8/8/2017 11:08:45 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20542-26695
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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James Wilkinson, the ringleader of the so-called Court Party, because it had as its ranking members judges of the court John Brown, Benjamin Sebastian, and Harry Innes; these men were eager for KY declaration of independence believing that it could exist as an independent state on an open Mississippi river. John Brown was convinced that KY could drive a better bargain with the Spanish at New Orleans than with the Americans at Philadelphia. CLARK2:125,127

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    Created: 8/8/2017 11:09:13 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20542-26696
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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At the third convention in Danville, James Wilkinson declared that there was no difference between the obnoxious domestic tax of Virginia and the offensive British colonial taxes. CLARK2:116

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    Created: 8/8/2017 11:09:39 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20542-26697
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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In the days of Kentucky's commercial beginnings, corn whiskey and ginseng, the second even more important than the first, were the only commodities which paid transportation expenses. CLARK2:20

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    Created: 8/8/2017 11:10:06 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20542-26698
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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Dr. Thomas Walker, exploring for the Loyal Land Company, is usually considered the first European to traverse this pass (4/13/1750), which he called it "Cave Gap." But he found evidence of earlier Europeans in their ubiquitious choppings and marks on trees -- crosses and other grafitti. His party traveled northwest to near the site of present-day Barbourville, where he divided his party, leaving half to construct a log cabin and establish a supply post, while he and the others explored the wilderness. He returned on 4/28. On 5/1 the explorers followed the Warrior's Trail inland to the present county of Magoffin; pushed on the the Big Sandy valley. Returned through "Cave Gap," which he renamed Cumberland Gap on 6/20. They had missed the Blue Grass region by one or two days' journey. CLARK2:33

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    Created: 8/8/2017 11:11:07 PM
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    ID: 27-40-20542-26699
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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Christopher Gist, representing the Ohio Land Company came to Kentucky in 1751. He first made an extended visit to the Shawnee towns along the Ohio, where he obtained much useful information from George Croghan. Mid-March he crossed the Ohio at the mouth of the Scioto. Traveled in the direction of the falls, but hearing from four Shawnee he met that sixty hostile French Indians were encamped there, he returned overland to his home on the Yadkin [through Cumberland Gap?] CLARK2:34-35

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    ID: 27-40-20542-26700
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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<There is . . . a confusing claim made by some of Judge Henderson's descendants that Daniel Boone's early adventures into Kentucky were subsidized by Henderson. This is improbable. It is highly suppositious that Boone had any connections with the Henderson Company before 1773.> CLARK2:60

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    Created: 8/8/2017 11:12:30 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20542-26701
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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<In Virginia and North Carolina, Tories had been maltreated, and in most cases they were deprived of their lands and forced to move themselves and families elsewhere.> CLARK2:107

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    Created: 8/8/2017 11:13:05 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20542-26702
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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<Daniel Boone, the chief representative of the frontier, was typical of this restless and ever-moving pioneer class.> CLARK2:91

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    Created: 8/8/2017 11:13:32 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20542-26703
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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Long Siege <This Boonesborough triumph is of considerable significance in Kentucky history. If Boonesborough had fallen, the other forts would have been captured, and the whites would have been driven out of the West.> CLARK2:79

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    Created: 8/8/2017 11:13:59 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20542-26704
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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"The Transylvania Company purchased land which had been bargained for several times." CLARK2:61

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    Created: 8/8/2017 11:14:24 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20542-26705
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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<Boone, as was typical of all the early western visitors, dreamed of a western empire.> CLARK2:58

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    Created: 8/8/2017 11:14:57 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20542-26706
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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<George Washington set the land rush in motion in the Big Sandy Valley; here the first claim stake driven bore his initials. This Washington plot was patented in 1772 from George III, in the name of John Fry.> CLARK2:49

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    Created: 8/8/2017 11:15:31 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20542-26707
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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Clark says DB and his companions were "imbued more with wanderlust than love for agricultural labors and domestic tranquillity." CLARK2:45

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    Created: 8/8/2017 11:16:00 PM
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    ID: 27-40-20542-26708
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1937

Thomas D. Clark, A HISTORY OF KENTUCKY (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1937)

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KENTUCKY Long Hunters Left on their adventure "to escape boring domestic duties at home and to explore western lands." CLARK2:44

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    Created: 8/8/2017 11:16:21 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20542-26709
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