John G. W. Dillin, THE KENTUCKY RIFLE (Washington: National Rifle Association of America, 1924)

1924

John G. W. Dillin, THE KENTUCKY RIFLE (Washington: National Rifle Association of America, 1924)

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Kentucky rifle, use of: reloading. Firing has left the pan open, the frizzen pushed forward, the hammer down. First the man swabs the bore. The worm, tightly wrapped with greased linen tow, is withdrawn from the patch box or leather hunting bag; the ramrod is drawn from its position under the barrel and the worm screwed to the small end of the rod; the butt of the rifle is pushed well to the left and in front, the left hand grasping the muzzle; the swab, held loosely in the right hand so that it will turn with the rifling, is pushed up and down the barrel; repeated two or three time, the rod is withdrawn and held between the knees. Rifle now drawn up squarely in front and held verticle by the left hand. The hanter places his lips over the muzzle and blows down the bore to clear the channel between barrel and pan. If the channel is clear, he knows that he will not have use for the pick. If it is clogged, he must force it open. Next the rifle butt is put back to the left with the left arm thrown around the rifle a foot below the muzzel. The powder horn and bag hanging on the right side are pushed forward by the right hand. The left hand seizes the measure which hangs to the gab or horn, and with the right hand the horn is raised to the lips and the plug or stopper drawn with the teeth. The left hand holds the measure; the right pours the powder. When measure is full, it is passed to the right hand and while the rifle is held by the left hand, the right pours the powder down the bore. Now a round, greased patch of linen or leather is withdrawn from the pouch and placed squarely across the muzzle with the fingers of the right hand and held in place with the thumb of the left while a ball is taken from the pouch and placed in the center of the patch. The head of the rod which has been raised the the right hand is brought to bear squarely on the ball, which is forced under pressure down the bore until it rests on the powder charge. The rod is then withdrawn and the worm and swab removed unless more shooting is soon expected, in which case the rod is not cleared or replaced in the thimbles. The rifle being loaded, it is primed. The piece is laid across the left arm and the frizzen pushed forward. If a grain or two of powder is found in the pan, no picking of the channel is necessary; if no powder is found, care to clear the channel must be exercised by use of the pick. The pan is now filled from a small horn containing very fine grain powder which insures quick and certain ignition. This whole process could be accomplished in about 20 seconds by an expert. Exceptions: some hunters carried balls already patched for quick action. In battle, some men carried their patches between the fingers of their left hands, balls in their mouth. Also, men used balls of larger bore to use in emergencies, when they did not have time to use patch. DLLN:50-51.

File: DLLN.NT1



    Created: 8/10/2017 9:27:42 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20562-27204
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20562-27204


1924

John G. W. Dillin, THE KENTUCKY RIFLE (Washington: National Rifle Association of America, 1924)

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Kentucky rifle, accuracy: in a test of a rifled piece by a good marksman, at 100 yards 10 hits out of 10 shots, at 200 yards, 10 of 10, at 300 yards, 5 of 10. "At any considerable distance beyond 300 yards the percentage of hits . . . was small and in a great measure a matter of chance." The penetration at 300 yards, or even beyond, was sufficient to kill. Gen. Washington had some special heavy bore rifles made for long-range sharpshooting, and wrote that excellent marksmen could hit targets of note papter (8x10') three out of five times at 80 rods (440 yards, or a quarter mile). DLLN:42,71

File: DLLN.NT1



    Created: 8/10/2017 9:28:06 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20562-27205
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20562-27205


1924

John G. W. Dillin, THE KENTUCKY RIFLE (Washington: National Rifle Association of America, 1924)

Keywords
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The Kentucky Rifle, traits: characteristic star on the cheek piece was of very early origin; full octagon barrels; carved stocks; few metal decorations; southern rifles very plain, often even without a patch box; rifle stocks stained very dark with soot and oil; varnish not used; calibre about .45 (smaller than the European bore of about .65), that is about 48 balls to the pound of lead; small charge; overall length ranging from 4.5' to over 6'; rifling needed to be redone because of wear and rusting, necessitating a thicker patch or heavier mould for the ball. DLLN:passim

File: DLLN.NT1



    Created: 8/10/2017 9:28:35 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20562-27206
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20562-27206


1924

John G. W. Dillin, THE KENTUCKY RIFLE (Washington: National Rifle Association of America, 1924)

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The hunting bag: made of tanned calfskin; divided into two and three parts to carry patches and patch material, flints, unspun flax for swabbing the bore, a bullet pouch, and a few light tools. DLLN:87

File: DLLN.NT1



    Created: 8/10/2017 9:28:57 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20562-27207
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20562-27207


1924

John G. W. Dillin, THE KENTUCKY RIFLE (Washington: National Rifle Association of America, 1924)

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8/28/1784: <Fayette County august the 28th 1784 <Sir I have misd Severel opertunitys of wrighting to you however it is Never to Late to Do good your Land is all Survayd But that of Martin Flanians [?] and that is to much Exsposed to Danger to Survay at this time and I Shall be obliged to hire a man to go and Show me Linns improvement as I Do not no his from the Rest and there is 4 or 5 on that Crick I Never Rec- [received?] your horse till about 2 Weekes a go But Desired [?] Cearey [?] to Sell him if posible But he Could not then I took him to our Corte and Sat the price of 250 pounds on him but I could Not get a Single Bid for him tho Every Man Liked the horse But money is not to be had at any Rate So I took him home and Swapt him for a Mare and Colt for my own use in Less I Can Sell hir to a good advantage and Shall advance 25 pounds for you I Can a Sure you if I had Cash I Could by 20 horsis in a week of pepel who want to Lift there plots out of the ofis the Ceasseys [?] 2 plots for setelment and preemtion and Farrows one all in the Registars ofis your Land obtaind by tresury warrants the plot is Not yet Returned But will in a few Days I am Sir your Most obdent <Daniel Boone.> DILLIN:plate 5

File: DLLN.NT1



    Created: 8/10/2017 9:29:23 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20562-27208
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20562-27208


1924

John G. W. Dillin, THE KENTUCKY RIFLE (Washington: National Rifle Association of America, 1924)

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Boone family bible, from Berks County, PA: <Daniel Boone (Son of Squire and Sarah Boone) was born in October, A.D. 1733. He was my Father's first Cousin Joshua Boone Jr first Cousin He and the Rest of their Family left Exeter on the first day of May 1750 and moved to North Carolina, where they Settled. But at present he is Settled on the Ohio at Kentucky. 1781 October 20. then Daniel Cameto See us the first time. 1788 February 16th, then Daniel Boone (with Rebecca his wife & their Son Nathan) Came to see us. He Died at Charette Village in Missouri on the 26th of Sept 1820, age 87 years.> DILLIN:plate 4 (photograph)

File: DLLN.NT1



    Created: 8/10/2017 9:29:47 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20562-27209
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20562-27209














    

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