Walter H. Hendricks, "Daniel Boone as a Virginian," BULLETIN (Historical Society of Washington County, Virginia) 2, no. 24 (1987)

1987

Walter H. Hendricks, "Daniel Boone as a Virginian," BULLETIN (Historical Society of Washington County, Virginia) 2, no. 24 (1987)

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Long Hunt of 1760, with Nathaniel Gist. Entered Virginia at Whitetop Mountain, in the Mount Rogers National Recreation Area. Probably following the "Indian Road" listed on the 1749 Peter Jefferson map of the Virginia-North Carolina line. From the mountain they had an unobstructed view to the west. They came to the site of present Abingdon. That night they were disturbed by a pack of wolves lurking around their camp, their eyes reflected in the campfire light. They tracked the wolves to their den in the morning, a cave in a hill on which today stands the Washington County courthouse building. Boone named the place Wolf Hill, which became the first name of the settlement there in 1768. From there he and Gist hunted down the Holston into present Tennessee. Walter H. Hendricks, "Daniel Boone as a Virginian," Historical Society of Washington County, Virginia, BULLETIN, Series II, No. 24 (1987):3

File: HNDRCKS.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 8:00:07 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20578-27775
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20578-27775


1987

Walter H. Hendricks, "Daniel Boone as a Virginian," BULLETIN (Historical Society of Washington County, Virginia) 2, no. 24 (1987)

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Route: to the location of Lick Creek in present Dickenson County, thence down that creek to Russell Fork of Big Sandy in Virginia. At Sand Lick he carved "D. Boone" on a beech tree. Continuing downstream past the mouth of McClure River, Cranesnest River, Pound River, to the spectacular Breaks Canyon, today called Breaks Interstate Park on the border of VA and KY. Along the rim of the canyon they made their way over the difficult terrain, thence down Russell Fork and Levisa River to a salt lick near present Paintsville KY, in the valley of Big Sandy. This was a rugged portion of KY, not the fertile area he had envisioned. Walter H. Hendricks, "Daniel Boone as a Virginian," Historical Society of Washington County, Virginia, BULLETIN, Series II, No. 24 (1987):3

File: HNDRCKS.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 8:00:36 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20578-27776
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20578-27776


1987

Walter H. Hendricks, "Daniel Boone as a Virginian," BULLETIN (Historical Society of Washington County, Virginia) 2, no. 24 (1987)

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Returning from this hunt, in spring 1773, he took the "historic Hunter's Trace," coming through Castle's Wood on Clinch, at that time the farthest settlement on the western frontier. Here he was seen by the McAfee brothers, who recorded in their journal that Boone was conferring with Captain William Russell. Walter H. Hendricks, "Daniel Boone as a Virginian," Historical Society of Washington County, Virginia, BULLETIN, Series II, No. 24 (1987):3

File: HNDRCKS.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 8:01:18 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20578-27777
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20578-27777


1987

Walter H. Hendricks, "Daniel Boone as a Virginian," BULLETIN (Historical Society of Washington County, Virginia) 2, no. 24 (1987)

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September 1773 DB departed the Yadkin, leading six families. Up the "Indian Road," entering Virginia at the present town of Damascus, continuing via Alternate US 58 to Castlewood. At this point (Damascus), DB sent James, the Mendenhall brothers (also from NC) to Buffalo Lick/Saltville to the north to pick up Isaac Crabtree [who had agreed to come along when DB was at Castlewood?]. The boys, without children and other encumbrances, could move rapidly, and would give Russell advance notice of the arrival of the party. The main party went directly to Castlewood. [Was James there when Boone arrived then?] From Castlewood, DB guided the party on [down the Clinch?] to meet the Bryan party in Powell's Valley. James, Henry, and the others, followed at a slower pace, driving the cattle. Russel, needing more time after such short notice to arrange his affairs, brought up the rear. Walter H. Hendricks, "Daniel Boone as a Virginian," Historical Society of Washington County, Virginia, BULLETIN, Series II, No. 24 (1987):4

File: HNDRCKS.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 8:01:57 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20578-27778
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20578-27778


1987

Walter H. Hendricks, "Daniel Boone as a Virginian," BULLETIN (Historical Society of Washington County, Virginia) 2, no. 24 (1987)

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DB involved with John "Jack" Jouett, Virginia's "Paul Revere." Cornwallis dispatched 220 mounted soldiers under Col. Banastre Tarleton, the famous cavalry leader known as the "Hunting Leopard" or "Bloody Ban" because of the ruthlessness of his men in South Carolina. They intended to capture the Virginia legislature in Charlottsville seventy miles to the west. This success would have crippled the already flagging morale of the newly declared nation and possibly broken the American spirit. They were more than half way to Charlottesville when they were observed in thenight by young Captain Jouett, on leave. Mounting his thoroughbred mare, by taking side roads and narrow trails, Jouette managed to pass around Tarleton, arriving in the early morning and warning Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, and others to escape. Some were captured. One of these was Boone, who with Jouett [?] was taking a wagon load of papers to the next intended meeting place for the government, Staunton, over the Blue Ridge. Walter H. Hendricks, "Daniel Boone as a Virginian," Historical Society of Washington County, Virginia, BULLETIN, Series II, No. 24 (1987):5

File: HNDRCKS.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 8:02:43 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20578-27779
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20578-27779


1987

Walter H. Hendricks, "Daniel Boone as a Virginian," BULLETIN (Historical Society of Washington County, Virginia) 2, no. 24 (1987)

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In the mid 1970s the Congress authorized studies by the National Park Service (NPS) toward establishing a Daniel Boone National Trail from the Yadkin River to Boonesborough. These studies continued until 1983. The study team determined that certain of the routes followed by Boone should be designated as "historic," "scenic," or "hunting routes." But their final conclusion was that no "National Trail" ought to be established because, they said, the Boone trails were not of national historic significance. Their reasoning was that Boone was not first into Kentucky, nor did he plant the first settlement, and more settlers came down the Ohio than over the Cumberland Gap. Apparently part of this conclusion was dictated by the mounting fiscal straits of the federal government. The conclusion drew widespread indignation. Consequently, on May 1, 1984, the House of Representatives passed a compromising amendment to the National Trails System Act, authorizing a recognition of Daniel Boone trough establishment of highway markings of a Daniel Boone Heritage Trail. This Historic Route traverses Virginia by way of Damascus, Abingdon, Castlewood, Dungannon, and Duffield to Cumberland Gap, a distance of some 138 miles. Walter H. Hendricks, "Daniel Boone as a Virginian," Historical Society of Washington County, Virginia, BULLETIN, Series II, No. 24 (1987):5-6

File: HNDRCKS.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 8:03:20 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20578-27780
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20578-27780


1987

Walter H. Hendricks, "Daniel Boone as a Virginian," BULLETIN (Historical Society of Washington County, Virginia) 2, no. 24 (1987)

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People
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The road makers followed the ancient Warrior's Path, which apparently had only been a footpath, since 30 axemen were required to upgrade it to a packhorse trail. Walter H. Hendricks, "Daniel Boone as a Virginian," Historical Society of Washington County, Virginia, BULLETIN, Series II, No. 24 (1987):5

File: HNDRCKS.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 8:03:58 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20578-27781
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20578-27781


1987

Walter H. Hendricks, "Daniel Boone as a Virginian," BULLETIN (Historical Society of Washington County, Virginia) 2, no. 24 (1987)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
DB "came down from the Clinch" at Castle's Wood to participate in the treaty. Quoting an unknown source; Walter H. Hendricks, "Daniel Boone as a Virginian," Historical Society of Washington County, Virginia, BULLETIN, Series II, No. 24 (1987):4

File: HNDRCKS.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 8:04:32 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20578-27782
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20578-27782














    

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