Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

Keywords
None.
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None.
The Ohio river country neceived a new Indian population from the east, west, north, and south in the period 1720-50; they were accompanied by a large and energetic troop of French and English traders. The centers of this new large-area settlement were at Alleghany (Logstown and other centers near the forks of the Ohio), Kuskuskies (Beaver and Lawrence counties, OH), Muskingum (Cochocton county OH), Lower Shawnee Town at the mouth of the Scioto, Pickawillany (Piqua, Miami county OH). HANNA 1:20-21

File: HANNA.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:51:55 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27963
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27963


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

Keywords
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None.
When first known to the French they were living in western KY on the lower Ohio, the Cumberland, and the Tennessee. From these places they were driven into eastern PA about 1690-1710. HANNA 1:124

File: HANNA.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:52:17 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27964
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27964


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

Keywords
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None.
Marquis de Beauharnois, Governor of Canada, report to Paris, 10/1/1728: The Chaouanon, <which consists of over 700 Indians, has been much attached to the French, and was the first to ask to approach them, saying they were unhappy alongside the English. . . . These Indians have begun a village on the river Ohio, which already contains more than 150 men and their families. They have traded from all time with the French, and are a very industrious people, cultivating a good deal of land.> Actually negotiations between the Susquehanna Shawnees and the French had been going on for an even longer ltime. Ocowellos, "King of the Upper Shawanese on Susquehanna," according to James Mitchell, a justice of Chester county PA, in 1723, had been visiting the French for several years. HANNA 1:184

File: HANNA.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:52:52 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27965
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27965


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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None.
Shawnee chiefs at Allegheny to Governor Gordon of PA, 6/1732: <The Chiefs of the Shawanese to the Honourable Governor of Pennsylvania: <We received your message by our friend, Edmund Cartlidge, and take it very kindly, and return you thanks for ye dram given us; and we hereby acquaint the Governor of the reason that we are come to settle here at Ohioh. <About nine years ago, the Five Nations told us at Shallyschohking [or Chillisquaque, at the mouth of the same-named creek, undoubtedly of the Chillicothe clan], we did not do well to settle there; for there was a great noise in the Great House [at Onondaga], and that in three years' time all should know what they [the Five Nations] had to say as far as there was any settlements or the sun set. <About ye expiration of three years aforesaid, the Five Nations came and said, "Our land is going to be taken from us. Come, brothers, assist us. Let us fall upon and fight with the English." We answered them, "No; we came here for peace, and have leave to settle here; and we are in league with them, and cannot break it." <About a year after, they ye Five Nations, told the Delawares and us, "Since you have not hearkened to us nor regarded what we have said, now we will put petticoats on you, and look upon you as women for the future, and not as men. Therefore, you Shawnanese, look back toward Ohio, the place from whence you came; and return thitherward; for now we shall take pity on the English, and let them have all this land." <And further said, "Now, since you are become women, I'll take Peahohquelloman [Pechoquelain], and put it on Meheahoming [Wyoming]; and I'll take Meheahoming and put it on Ohioh; and Ohioh I'll put on Woabach; and that shall be the warriors' road for the future. <One reason of our leaving our former settlements and coming here is, several negro slaves used to run away and come amongst us; and we thought ye English would blame us for it. <The Delaware Indians some time gao bid us depart, for they was dry, and wanted to drink ye thand away. Whereupon, we told them, "Since some of you are gone to Ohioh, we will go there also. We hope you will not drink that away, too." <And whereas, the Governor desires to see some of us at Philadelphia, we shall answer his request; for some of our chiefs will come this summer and pay him a visit; but how many of us or exact the time, we know not as yet. But when we are got so far as Peter Chartier's, we shall send word how many of us there is, and when we shall be there; and bring our friends, the Conestogas, along with us. In the meantime, we remain, your Friends and Brethren, <Noochickoneh <Pawquawsie <Uppockeaty <Queequeeptoo <Present: James Le Tort, Interpreter <Peter Chartier <Taken down by me, Edmund Cartlidge> HANNA 1:189-90

File: HANNA.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:53:21 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27966
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27966


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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Shawnee chiefs to Governor and Council of PA, 5/1/1734: <My Brethren: <Sometime ago Edmund [Cartlidge] brought a letter amongst us, and withal advised me to mind and be careful of my people; and if we wanted any assistance, we might expect it from you; which we are very glad to hear. As for ye belt of wampum you sent by ye Five Nations, we have not yet had, though so often mentioned. <Edward Kenny, Jacob Pyatt, Timy. Fitzpatrick, Wm. Dewlap, and Jno. Kelly of Donegal, come trading with us without license; which is a hindrance to ye licensed Traders. Charles Poke and Thos. Hill are vey pernicious; for they have abused us; and we gave them a fathom of white wampum, desiring them by that token to acquaint you how they had served us. And at a drinking bout, Henry Bayley, Oliver Wallis, and Jno. Young, took one of our old men, and after having tied him, abused him very much. Jas. Denning was among them, and abused us likewise. Such people, we think, are not proper to deal with us. Jno. Kelly of Paxtang has made a great disturbance by raising false reports among us; and Timy. Fitzpatrick, Thos. Moren, and Jno Palmer quarrel often with us; therefore, we desire those four men may be kept particularly from us. <Jonas Davenport, Laz. Lowrey, Jas. Le Tort, Fras. Stevens, Jas. Patterson, Ed. Cartlidge, we desire, may have license to come and trade with us; as also, Peter Cheartier, who we reckon one of us; and he is welcome to come as long as he pleases. <Likewise, we beg at our council, that no Trader above mentioned may be allowed to bring more than thirty gallons of rum, twice in a year, and no more; for by that means, we shall be capable of paying our debts and making our creditors easy; which we cannot do otherwise. And that every Trader may be obliged to bring his rum in ye cabin where he lives, directy, and not to hide any in ye woods; but for P. Cheartier to bring what quantity he pleases; for he trades further yn. ye rest. And that every trader bring his license with him. <And for our parts, if we see any other Traders than those we desire amongst us, we will stave their cags [kegs], and seize their goods, likewise. <We also beg, every Trader may be obliged to bring good powder. <And, if we are indebted to any of those we desire may not be admitted to trade with us, if they will come without goods or rum, if we have it by us, we will pay them their due. <We also hope no hired man will have liberty to bring any rum with him. <We are, your friends and brethren. <Nechikonner, Opockeetor, Cawkecawlen, Olanawkanor, Meelatinen <Teste -- Jonah Davenport, James Le Lort [Tort?], Larey Lowrey, Peter Cheartier> HANNA 1:309-10

File: HANNA.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:53:47 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27967
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27967


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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None.
In the Shawnee language, the "r" sound is so rare as to be practically unused. English words with an "r" sound would be pronounced by an Algonquin-speaker as if spelled with an "l." HANNA 1:313

File: HANNA.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:54:06 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27968
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27968


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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None.
1738 100 Shawnees at Allegheny signed a written agreement that no rum should be permitted to be brought into any of their towns for a period of four years; that any liquor there at the time should be "broke and spilt," and likewise for any brought in future. HANNA 2:306

File: HANNA.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:54:38 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27969
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27969


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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None.
Shawnee chiefs to the PA Council, 8/10/1737: the Shawnee had been strongly solicited by the French to return to them; every year the French sent them powder, lead, tobacco; the Shawnees have now gotten so far to the westward that they cannot but fall into French hands; they should return to the Susquehanna, but the hunting was too limited; therefore the government must supply them at Allegheny. HANNA 1:353-54

File: HANNA.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:55:17 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27970
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27970


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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None.
1731 there were three towns of the Shawnees on the Conemaugh River with 200 men, 45 families. About this time the Shawnees from Opessa's Town on the Potomas removed to the Allegheny, followed during the next few years by the majority of the Pequea Shawnees living in the Cumberland Valley. These were accompanied by Peter Chartier. HANNA 1:352-53

File: HANNA.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:55:47 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27971
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27971


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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None.
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None.
The Shawnee town at the mouth of Bull Creek on the Allegheny (Alolegheny county PA), known after its abandonment as Chartier's Old Town, was the principal town of the Shawnees during the decade 1735-45. This was known by the traders as Alleghenia, or Allegheny on the Main Road. HANNA 1:290-91

File: HANNA.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:56:06 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27972
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27972


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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None.
Chartier's band of Shawnees arrived on the Ohio in 1745; others a year earlier. Chartier's Shawnees were descendants of that group who had followed Martin Chartier from Illinois. Their new village became the center of the fur trade system of the Pennsylvania traders: Logstown, which the French knew as Shenango (Chiningue). HANNA 1:352-353

File: HANNA.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:56:40 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27973
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27973


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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None.
Peter Chartier, a half-breed French-Shawnee trader began conducting business at Allegheny as early as 1732. HANNA 1:307

File: HANNA.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:57:08 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27974
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27974


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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The final Iroquois defeat of the Shawnees was in 1672. HANNA 2:95

File: HANNA.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:57:28 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27975
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27975


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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None.
Conrad Weiser, in conference with the chiefs of the Six Nations at Albany, 7/3/1754: <The road to Ohio is no new road; it is an old and frequented road; the Shawnese and Delawares removed thither above thirty years ago from Pennsylvania, ever since which that road has been travelled by out Traders at their invitation, and always with safety, until within these few years, that the French sent armies there.> quoted in Hanna 1:183

File: HANNA.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:58:01 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27976
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27976


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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The site later known as Shawnee Old Fields, known among the traders as Little Pict Town, and often designated Eskippakithiki, a word possibly a varitation on Kiskapocoke, from the Kispoko division of the Shawnees. HANNA 1:147

File: HANNA.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:58:22 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27977
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27977


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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Leaving PA and removing to the Ohio valley, ca 1727-30, they used the Juniata or Frankstown Path. This later became the Main Road from the settlements to the West, used by traders, later by pioneer settlers. HANNA 1:249

File: HANNA.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:58:45 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27978
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27978


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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Lower Shawnee Town on the Scioto was founded as early as 1730. HANNA 1:305

File: HANNA.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:59:04 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27979
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27979


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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Franquelin's 1684 map shows that the Shawnees then lived north of the Cumberland River, within the present state of KY. HANNA 2:94

File: HANNA.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:59:24 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27980
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27980


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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None.
Lower Shawnee Town was probably known by them as Chillicothe. HANNA 2:129

File: HANNA.NT1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:59:42 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27981
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27981


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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Chartier's band of some 300-400 Shawnees came to Lower Shawnee Town in April 1745. This band also first settled the town on Lulbegrud creek, later known by traders as the Little Pict Town. HANNA 2:134

File: HANNA.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:00:03 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27982
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27982


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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Licensed as a trader in 1744,45,46; list of unlicensed traders in 47,48; listed as a witness on a message from the Shawnee chiefs to PA governor in 1752. He probably was the Findley who married the daughter of trader John Harris in 1744; had two daughters; wife died in 1769, which he wound have discovered upon his return from KY. HANNA 2:230,33

File: HANNA.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:00:35 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27983
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27983


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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After the building of Ft. Pitt, Findley seems to have settled there with George Croghan. On list of inhabitants of 1760. HANNA 2:234

File: HANNA.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:01:00 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27984
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27984


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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None.
First authenticated visit of white man to KY was a French party that descended the Ohio as far as Big Bone Lick in 1729. There was a second French expedition, under the Baron de Longueuil, Major of Montreal, who traversed the whole course of the Ohio below Coneqango creek in the summer of 1739: 85 French, over 200 French Iroquois, and 100 or more Algonquins. The first recorded English visit is of John Peter Sallwy, PA German, in 1742, in company with five others. Peter Chartier was also another early trader on the Ohio, and helped to found Eskippakithiki. HANNA 2:238-240

File: HANNA.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:01:25 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27985
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27985


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

Keywords
None.
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None.
George Croghan, deposition 2/27/1777: <The Deponent being first sworn, &c. Deposeth -- That in the year 1750 or 1751 [the winter of 50-51], he then being trading among the Shawanese at the mouth of Scioto, he saw several Shawanese and Cherokees, who had just come over the Allegheny [Cumberland] Mountain from the Cherokee Country; on which a Council was called of all the Indians thereabouts, when the Shawanese informed the chiefs of their nation who resided at Scioto, that they were returned from the Cherokee Nation, and had left their women and children, with several of their young men at the Blue Licks on Kentucke River [perhaps the Little Blue Licks in Madison county near the Kentucky River, not the licks on Licking; probably refers to the town of Eskippakithiki], where they intended to reside and hunt that season. [At the council] the Cherokees addressed themselves to the Six Nations, and requested they might have liberty to hunt between the Allegheny [Cumberland] Mountain and the Ohio for the season; as they knew the country belonged to them.> HANNA 2:250-252

SHAWNEE Hanna suggests Eskippakithiki means "Blue Lick Town." <Gallatin gives "eskipakehah" as the Sauk word for "blue," and this is exactly the meaning of the Shawnee word, "skipaki" or "eskippaki." "Thiki" means "place." [Very much like "kith" or "town" as in "Kithtipikicanoe" -- JMF] On Franquelin's 1684 map, made up from data furnished by La Salle, a river in this vicinity is given the name "Skpakicipi" or "Riviere Bleue." Hanna concludes that the name "Blue" or "Blue Licks" was possibly the prehistoric Indian name of a river in this part of the Ohio valley, probably either the Kentucky or the Cumberland, on which were located several Shawnee towns. The Iroquois name for this place, "Kenta-ke" meant "Many Fields" or prairie, was applied before 1752, and eventually became the name for the whole area. HANNA 2:240,256

File: HANNA2.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:03:57 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27986
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27986


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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George Clinton, Gov. of NY to Pennsylvania Council held 8/7/1753: <Some of our Indian Traders were taken prisoners by a party of Cognawago, or Praying French Indians, as they were trading with the Cuttawas, one hundred miles from the Lower Shawonese Town on Ohio, and stripped and plundered of their goods and skins, and carried prisoners to Montreal, from whence they sent a letter to Mr. Saunders, Mayor of Albany.> That letter, dated Montreal, 6/9/1753, read in part: <There are six Englishmen of us here in this place that are taken prisoners by the French Indians. We were taken from off the south side of Allegheny [Ohio] River, about one hundred miles, on the twenty-sixth of last January. . . . We are all of us from Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and were all Indian Traders. . . .> signed by Alexander McGinty, Jabez Evans, Jacob Evans, David Hendricks, William Powell, and Thomas Hyde. They sent a second letter from "Conawagos Town," 6/12/1753 pleading for assistance in getting released. A third letter sent by David Hendricks was dated 6/22/1753 "from ye damned Papist Church at ye Conewagoe Town, hard by Mont Rall." Conrad Weiser, on 9/2/1753, stated that the men had been taken because they got into a fight with the Canada Indians, one of them firing his musket and wounding an Indian in the arm. Alexander McGinty returned to Philadelphia in 10/1753 and made the following deposition: <On the twenty-sixth of January last your petitioner, in company with six other Indian Traders, being on their return from a trading journey among the Cuttawas [Cherokees] . . . was met and taken prisoner by a party of French Indians. . . at a place about twenty-five miles from the Blue Lick Town [Eskippakithiki], and on the south bank of Cantucky River, which empties itself into Allegheny [Ohio] River about two hundred miles below the Lower Shawnee Town.> Said they were carried to the towns on the Miami, then to Detroit, then to Montreal.

File: HANNA2.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:04:25 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27987
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27987


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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After Walker the next important explorer was Christopher Gist, surveyor employed by the Ohio Company of VA to report on lands lying to the westward of the mountains in 1751. Down the Ohio to the Lower Shawnee Town, to Pickawillany town on the Great Miami, back to the Scioto. From there with a "negro boy" down the river on the KY side, hoping to see the Falls of the Ohio. About 18 miles downriver met trader Hugh Crawford and two employees of trader Robert Smith who gave him mastodon teeth. About 15 miles above the Falls he turned inland, afraid of capture by the French or French-allied Indians, and traveled across an unknown area of KY. HANNA 2:250-52

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    Created: 8/14/2017 12:04:51 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27988
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27988


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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Dr. Thomas Walker was the first explorer to leave a detailed account of his journey through KY. Working for the Loyal Land Company, left his home in Albemarle county VA in 3/1750 "to go to the Westward in order to discover a proper place for settlement," accompanied by Ambrose Powell, William Tomlinson, Colby Chew, Henry Lawless, and John Hughes. He followed hunter's and Indian traces across Cave Gap (which he renamed Cumberland Gap on his return trip) and into KY. HANNA 2:242-247

File: HANNA2.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:05:11 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27989
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27989


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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English traders were in the northern KY region in the 1740s, as suggested by Christopher Gist's receipt from the employees of Robert Smith in 1751, a trader at the Ohio Shawnee town of Pickawilany, two mastodon teeth from the Big Bone Lick. HANNA 2:242

File: HANNA2.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:05:32 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27990
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27990


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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Eskippakithiki is shown on Evan's map of 1755 between the Licking and Kentucky rivers. It was directly on the route of the Great Warriors Path leading from the Ohio southward through Cumberland Gap. Franklin alluded to it in his OHIO SETTLEMENT:44 "in the year 1752, the Six Nations, Shawanese, and Delawares had a large Town on Kentucky River." It was settled in 1745 by Peter Chartier, a half-breed Shawnee and French trader of considerable influence among the Shawnees. Perhaps a population in the town of 450. It was quite prosperous, but came to be harrassed by "Northern Indians," probably Iroquois who claimed the country for themselves. Was abandoned because of these attacks sometime before 1748. They resettled at Lower Shawnee Town at the mouth of the Scioto. Black Hoof or Catahecassa was born at Eskippakithiki and participated in this remove; when he visited Indian Old Fields in 1815 or 1816 he pointed out and described the old town at the site and its surrounding country. After the departure of Chartier's band the site was used by hunters; and this was the way in which Findley was brought there in 1752. HANNA 2:240-242, using Draper liberally.

File: HANNA2.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:05:59 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27991
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27991


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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Arnold Viele in 1693. French party led by De Lery descended the Ohio as far as the Big Bone Lick in 1729. Maj. Baron de Longueuil of Montreal lead a party of nearly a hundred Frenchmen and some 300 Indians from assorted tribes down the whole course of the Ohio below Conewango Creek in the summer of 1739. James Le Tort traded near the mouth of the Kanawha many years before 1740. Numerous other Allegheny traders were along the Ohio at the same time. John Peter Salley, a Pennsylvania German, was the first English-speaker along the shores of KY, in company with John Howard, Josiah Howard, Charles Sinclair, and two others; started 3/16/1742 from Augusta county, to the Kanawha where they floated down eventually reaching the Ohio, down to the Mississippi, eventually captured by a party of French and Indians who carried them to New Orleans, where they languished in prison for 18 months, escaping in 10/1744, finally reaching home by way of Georgia in 5/1745. HANNA 2:238-240

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    Created: 8/14/2017 12:06:23 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27992
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27992


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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Peter Chartier with his Shawnees fled down the Ohio from Chartier's Town in 1745 and became an early trader on KY soil. He and his band built the town of Eskippakithiki. HANNA 2:240

File: HANNA2.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:06:49 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27993
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27993


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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Hanna collects information about his whereabouts before 1767: Licensed as an Indian trader 1744, 1745, 1746; name also on a list of unlicensed traders 1747-48. His name appears as one of the witneses to a "Message to the Governor from the Shawonese" sent by four chiefs of the Lower Shawnee Town at the mouth of the Scioto, 2/8/1752. Capt. William Trent to Gov. Hamilton, Virginia, 4/10/1753: Reports that he has heard from George Croghan, his partner, that "at a place called KENTUCKY . . . about one hundred and fifty miles from the lower Shawanese town," at the "Little Pict Town," the Indians attacked the traders, took three or four hundred pounds of goods, and "three of John Finley's men are killed . . . and no account of himself." In an Augusta county VA deposition somewhat later, "John Finley of the Province of Pennsylvania" said he was at Shenoppini Indian Town, at the site of Pittsburg in 6/1753, so he clearly survived and escaped this attack. HANNA 2:230-231

File: HANNA2.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:07:25 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27994
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27994


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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Hanna carefully examines the records he can find on all the John or J. Findleys or Findleys or Findlays in Pennsylvania and concludes from this exhaustive search: <By a process of elimation . . . and from the facts . . . the daughter of the Indian Trader, John Harris, married a man who spelled his name "John Findlay" (which Draper says was the correct spelling of the name of Boone's pilot), and that this individual had taken up his residence in a place so remote as South Carolina (on the borders of which Daniel Boone dwelt prior to 1769). . . .> HANNA 2:233

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    Created: 8/14/2017 12:07:45 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27995
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27995


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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Unidentified newspaper clipping, extract from a Philadelphia letter 1/3/1772: <Several Senecas have lately been killed by out people, and the Indians, in revenge, have murdered a whole family on Buffalo Creek, and four farmers on Youghiogany; and they have likewise killed Robert Parsons, the trader, and robbed John Findley of above five hundred pounds' worth of goods.> in Draper 2B196 quoted in HANNA 2:229

File: HANNA2.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:08:09 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27996
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27996


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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JFINDLEY seems to have settled at Fort Pitt after its construction, one of a number of Cumberland county traders there with George Croghan. He is listed as an inhabitant there in 7/1760 and 4/1761. John Jennings, traveling down the Ohio River in 1766 mentions meeting him on a river bateau that plied the trade between Fort Pitt and New Orleans. HANNA 2:234-235

File: HANNA2.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:08:26 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27997
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27997


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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The daughter of John Harris died while Findley was in KY with DB. A London newspaper dated 1/3/1772 lists him as in possession of L500 worth of goods; Hanna concludes his estate must have been increased by an inheritance from his dead wife, whose father was a substantial trader and a large landowner at his death. Findley inherited a life interest in two separate tracts of land. HANNA 2:236

File: HANNA2.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:08:49 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27998
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27998


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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DB in KY, ascends a hill and looks out over the rich land: LCD says this was the ridge dividing Rockcastle and Kentucky rivers, the knob called Big Hill; says Peck puts the location too far east. Bases this on the statements of Daniel Bryan, DB's nephew, who was in KY as early as 1777, and Samuel Boone, another nephew, who resided for many years in the region of Station Camp Creek, where the adventurers established their camp. Draper in HANNA 2:220

File: HANNA2.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:09:25 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-27999
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-27999


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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What interested DB and Squire so in Findley's tall tales? <Carolina was getting altogether too thickly settled, and game so scarce as to render a roast wild turkey or a venison steak quite a rarity. Florida had been tried and found wanting; the sterile hills and laurel mountains of Sandy were entirely uninviting; but the country which Findley had seen, and which he now so bewitchingly described, seemed to fire their imaginations, and promised to fulfill completely their long-cherished ideal of terrestrial beauty and perfection.> Draper 2B173 quoted in HANNA 2:217

File: HANNA2.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:09:52 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-28000
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-28000


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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1752 descended the Ohio in a canoe with three r four others and a cargo of trade goods. To the Falls of the Ohio. Joined a party of Shawnees on their fall-winter hunt to the interior of KY; traveled from Big Bone Creek along an Indian trail (on Evans 1755 map) to a settlement situated a mile west of the oil spring on Lulbegrud Creek, called Eskippakithiki by the Shawnees, Little Pict Town by the traders, Indian Old Fields by the settlers after 1800, on a beautiful small prairie with a better quality of land than generally found in that part of the country. Findley erected a cabin for a trading house amid the huts of the Shawnees. Other traders found their ways there as well. A dispute arose between some of these traders and the Indians; on 1/26/1753 a fight broke out, some traders were killed, their goods seized, and six (Alexander McGinty, Jabez Evans, Jacob Evans, David Hendricks, William Powell, and Thomas Hyde) were taken to Montreal. Findley was apparently not involved in this altercation, but soon left for the safety of the settlements. HANNA 2:215-216 (utilizing Draper's biography for the basis of his account)

File: HANNA2.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:10:21 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-28001
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-28001


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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LCD says his account <might seem to smack somewhat of extravagance, for he assured Boone, that such was the strength of the current at the Falls of the Ohio, and so plenty were wild geese and ducks there, they were continually drawn over the cataract, dashed against the rocks and killed, and a person had only to go in a canoe below, and pick up as many of these fowls, fat and plump, as he wanted.> quoted in HANNA 2:216-217

File: HANNA2.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:10:45 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-28002
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-28002


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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Reuben G. Thwaites, 3/1902: <The late Dr. Lyman C. Draper was, in his day, the greatest living authority on all appertaining to Daniel Boone and the settlement of Kentucky. He gathered an immense amount of materials on the subject, which is now in the library of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, at Madison; but as yet unindexed. He commenced writing a LIFE OF BOONE, but did not get very far into the subject . . . [which was] intended to be a ponderous work of many volumes.> quoted in HANNA 2:212

File: HANNA2.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:11:16 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-28003
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-28003


1911

Charles A. Hanna, THE WILDERNESS TRAIL, OR THE VENTURES AND ADVENTURES OF THE PENNSYLVANIA TRADERS ON THE ALLEGHENY PATH, WITH SOME NEW ANNALS OF THE OLD WEST, AND THE RECORDS OF SOME STRONG MEN AND SOME BAD ONES, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1911)

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Lower Blue Licks were called Great Buffalo Lick on Evans 1755 map; he secured his information from English traders, and said he was especially indebted to Alexander McGinty and Alexander Lowrey. HANNA 2:255n

File: HANNA2.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:11:52 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20646-28004
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20646-28004














    

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