Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

Keywords
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None.
Probably left southern Ohio because of Iroquois attacks about 1680. In the late seventeenth century some Shawnees lived at LaSalle's Fort St. Louis on the Illinois River; others with the Creeks in Alabama and eastern Tennesse, and these traded with the Spanish at St. Augustine. In the opening years of the eighteenth century they were on the Potomac in Maryland and in eastern Pennsylvania. During the 1730s they drew together on the Scioto River segments of the nation that had been scattered since the period of the Iroquois Wars. Moving west with the Delaware because of American population pressure and land sales managed by the Iroquois. At new hunting bases in the upper Ohio valley they traded with Pennsylvania and Virginia traders. The vanguard of the movement was marked by LeTort's trading post established about 1729 on the Ohio above the Kanawha River. Further downriver the Shawnees established a new headquarters, Lower Shawneetown at the mouth of the Scioto. Logstown (founded 1743) on the Ohio was an important intertribal center. About 1748 the Shawnees persuaded a group of Miami to establish a new town, Pickawilany, near present Piqua, Ohio, on the upper waters of the Great Miami. Here PA traders penetrated furthest into the French trading territory, even carrying trade goods north to a winter hunting base at the juncture of the Maumee and Auglaize rivers. The French destroyed Pickawilany and its British traders in 1752. In the same year the French and their Indian allies struck the British trading post at Eskippakithiki (founded 1745 by Peter Chartier's band of Shawnees) on Lulbegrud Creek in KY. TANNER:31,43-45.

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:40:28 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28058
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28058


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

Keywords
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None.
Another wave of western migration took place when the British occupied Pittsburgh in 1758. The largely Shawnee population left Logstown, trading center on the Ohio, 18 miles below Pittsburgh. They also left Wyoming, on the Susquehanna. As the Shawnee population in Ohio increased, village locations changed. The Upper Shawnee at the mouth of the Kanawha River established a new community, Wakatomica, in 1756 on the fringe of the newly formed Delaware population on the headwaters of the Muskingum. In 1758 Lower Shawneetown, at the mouth of the Scioto River, moved upriver fifty miles to the plains near Circleville, Ohio. TANNER:47

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:40:49 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28059
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28059


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

Keywords
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People
None.
Pontiac's War. Shawnees shared Pontiac's immediate objective: eliminate the British from the Great Lakes Region. Three objections to British behavior: discontinuation of French gift giving (powder and ammunition); indications of coming settlement; the arrogance and prejudice of the British. Three outside influences: appeal for war circulated by the Senecas as early as 1761; encouragement of French Americans of Detroit and Illinois; teachings of Neolin, Delaware Prophet of Tuscarawas Town in Ohio -- which may have come from the example of western Indians who were not yet dependent on colonists. Shawnees participated in the attack on Fort Pitt and on the army of Bouquet, but were repelled. TANNER:49

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:41:07 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28060
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28060


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

Keywords
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People
None.
After Pontiac's War the Shawnees of south central Ohio were clustered in the Scioto River valley between the modern towns of Chillicothe and Circleville. They hunted south of the Ohio River in the Kentucky country and along the Great and Little Miami rivers west of their towns. TANNER:62

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:41:25 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28061
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28061


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

Keywords
None.
People
None.
4/1774 Massacre of family of Logan, Mingo chief on Ohio at Yellow Creek 8/1774 Maj. Angus McDonald and 400 VA militia burned 5 Wakatomica towns of the Shawnee west of Muskingum River 10/1774 Battle of Point Pleasant: 900 Shawnee and their allies withdrew after attack on 1200 VA militia at mouth of Kanawha 2/1778 "Squaw Campaign": Gen Edward Hand and 500 PA militia attacked Delaware women making salt in ne Ohio 7/1778 Clark arrived at Kaskaskia 8/1778 Lt. Leonard Helm advanced from Kaskaskia to Vincennes 12/1778 Gen Henry Hamilton retook Vincennes with 500 Indians 2/1779 Clark retook Vincennes 3/1779 Clark attacked Delaware camps on lower White River, Indiana 5/1779 Col. John Bowman and 300 KY militia attacked Chillicothe on Little Miami 8/1780 Clark and 1000 KY militia and VA regulars destroyed Chillicothe and Piqua on the Miami and Mad rivers, Ohio 6/1782 Crawford burned in revenge for the Gnadenhutten massacre 11/1782 Clark and 1050 militia destroyed 3 Shawnee towns on Great Miami River in retialiation for the victory at the Blue Licks; Col. Benjamin Logan destroyed British supplies at Lorimer's Store. 10/1786 Logan and 800 men move from Limestone to attack 7 Shawnee towns on the upper Mad River, Ohio 9/1787 Kentuckians final attack on Shawnee remaining at Old Chillicothe on Paint Creek, Ohio 8/1789 Maj. John Hardin and 250 KY militia attacked Wea towns on Wabash 10/1790 Gen Josiah Harmar with 320 regulars and 1100 KY militia burned 5 towns of Miami, Shawnee, and Delaware at the head of Maumee River, but defeated with 270 casulaties in two engagements 5/1791 Gen. Charles Scott and 700 mounted KY militia burned 3 Wea and Kickapoo towns on Wabash 8/1791 Gen. James Wilkinson and 500 KY militia attacked Miami town on Eel River and burned Wea towns second time 11/1791 Gen. Arthur St. Clair's 1400 troops attacked and disastrously defeated at site of later Fort Recovery by 1000 Indian confederates under the leadership of Miami Little Turtle; 600 Americans killed, 300 wounded. 8/1784 Gen. Anthony Wayne's 2000 regulars and 1000 KY militia under Gen. Charles Scott defeat Indians confederates at the Battle of Fallen Timbers; 9 towns and extensive fields of Delaware, Miami, Wyandot, Ottawa, and Shawnee destroyed along the Maumee River. TANNER:71-73

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:41:57 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28062
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28062


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

Keywords
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People
None.
The first KY retaliation against the attacks of "Lakes" Indians came in 1779 with the somewhat ineffective raid on Chillicothe 2, the Indian town most accessible to Kentuckians who generally rendezvoused at the mouth of the Licking River. After the Henry Bird expedition of Indians and British Rangers into Kentucky in 1780, carrying away 305 prisoners, George Rogers Clark brought cannon against both Chillicothe 2 and Piqua 2. These towns, usually located within easy communication distance of each other, moved next to third locations in Ohio on the Great Miami River, near present Piqua. TANNER:82

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:42:15 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28063
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28063


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

Keywords
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People
None.
Shawnee towns were hit by Kentucky expeditions in 1782 and 1786. Piqua 3 and Chillicothe 3 and their associated settlements lay on the well-traveled Miami River course. This configuration of settlements had developed during the previous five years with Waketamica 2, two miles south of present Zanesfield, as the headquarters. The attack of 11/1782 was a response to the defeat at the Blue Licks. The area vacated included about half a dozen Shawnee settlements (only three are mapped on p.85), and Lorimer's Post, the major supply depot established in 1769 at the wouth end of the portage to the Auglaize and St. marys rivers. Chillicothe 3 (or Standing Stone village), occupying the 1752 site of Pickawilllany (present Piqua), moved north to the portage point on the St. Marys River (present St. Marys). This town was sometimes called "New Chillicothe," but became better known as Girty's Town, the residence of trader James Girty, brother of Simon, who had been raised in a Shawnee family. The remaining population from the Great Miami region enlarged the Shawnee component on the upper Mad in southern Logan and northern Champaign counties. Piqua 3 located at present West Liberty. The Mequashake division had a double town straddling Mequaschaik Creek east of present West Liberty. Kispolo 2, also known as Alexander McKee's Town, was situated on present McKee's Creek; Blue Jacket lived at present Bellefontaine. Limestone became the port of entry for settlers arriving by boat in 1784. Many people were moving north across the Ohio. George Rogers Clark's people moved north to found Clarksville in Indians in 1784. Fort Harmar, at the mouth of the Muskingum River, completed in 1786, marks the tenative beginning of future American control of the Ohio country. Fort Finney, at the mouth of the Great Miami, was the site of Shawnee and American delegations holding treaty sessions in 1/1786, but subsequently declared invalid by the Indians. By 1786 most of the Shawnees appeared inclined toward peace. But atacks on the KY settlements continued, principally from the Wabash country. Logan therefore struck the Shawnees at the head ofthe Mad River again in 11/1786 while their warriors were absent defending the towns on the Wabash against an expeced attack of Clark's that did not materialize. The peaceable Mequashake chief Melunthe, leader of the Shawnees at the Fort Finney council, was captured and killed. The prisoners, principally women and children were taken back to KY. The Indians confederacy meeting in Detroit in 12/1786 renewed the demand that the US respect the Ohio river boundry. The new military headquarters for the confederacy became the Miami towns at present Fort Wayne. Some Shawnees went to s. Indians, others to Missouri. TANNER:85-86

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:42:44 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28064
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28064


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

Keywords
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People
None.
Chillicothe 1 on Paint Creek was attacked in the fall of 1787; inhabitants fled to the lower White River. With this evacuation, southern Ohio was cleared of stable Indian communities, but was still used for hunting and planting in support of war parties patrolling the Ohio River in an effort to prevent further white settlement. Raids on isolated KY homes and riverboats continued. Other Shawnees moved following Logan's expedition of 1786: some of the Kispoko division lived for several years with the Chicamaugua Cherokee on the TN River near the Alabama-GA border. Some who had maintained frequent communication with Spanish authorities in St. Louis since 1784 crossed the Mississippi to the Cape Girardeau region. In 1788 Shawnees, probably from the White River country of the Wabash, emerged to establish Chillicothe 5 on the Maumee River a few miles east of Fort Miami. Piqua 5 followed in early 1790. These were the last towns added to the Miami towns complex that had grown from 2 to 7 towns since 1785. TANNER:87

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:43:10 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28065
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28065


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

Keywords
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People
None.
Missouri: there were Shawnees there by 1784; the concentration increased following Logan's raid in 1786; the Spanish invited Louis Peter Lorimer, whose trading post at the head of the Miami River had been destroyed by Kentuckians in 1782, to move across the Mississippi and bring his Indian clients. The Spanish aim was to thwart British and American expansion. In 1787 about 1200 Shawnees and 600 Delawares settled in the Ste. Genevieve and Cape Girardeau districts. About the same time Roger's band of Shawnees located near St. Charles. Lorimer was to act as interpreter on the staff of the Spanish Indian administration. The Shawnees were still there as late as the 1830s. TANNER:92-95, 141

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:43:30 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28066
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28066


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

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None.
Disease. In 1762 a serious communicable disease, possibly smallpox, spread among the Mingos, Delawares, and Shawnees of the upper Muskingum and Scioto river valleys. But there was a confirmed epidemic of smallpos in 1764. It began in 1763 when the British at Fort Pitt pursued a deliberate policy of spreading disease-infected blankets among the tribes involved in Pontiac's uprising. The epidemic was broad in geographic extent, hitting the Mingos, Wyandots, Delawares, and Shawnees of Ohio. TANNER:171, 173

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:43:55 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28067
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28067


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

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None.
Not all east of the Mississippi were removed in the 1830s. Some hid in the wooded hills of West Virginia until lumbering began, then moved back to the rugged terrain in southern Ohio, far back from the traveled roads. There was a Shawnee settlement near Indianapolis in 1870 that included a dozen families, followers of Tecumseh and the Prophet, who returned from Canada about 1821, purchased land, and maintaned a council form of community government until the 1880s. TANNER:175

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:44:14 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28068
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28068


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

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People
None.
The new headquarters for the Shawnees who remained east of the Mississippi was Wapakoneta, established during the 1790s on the upper Auglaize. TANNER:102

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:44:32 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28069
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28069


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

Keywords
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People
None.
SHAWNEE began to move out of the Miami towns complex in 1791, the first stage of further migration to Spanish Missouri. Others remained in the area; Blue Jacket was one of the principal leaders there. TANNER:89-90

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:44:47 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28070
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28070


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

Keywords
None.
People
None.
The period from Dunmore's War in 1774 to the Treaty of Greenville in 1795 was a continual war for the possession of the Ohio country. Tribes represented at Greenville were the Wyandot, Delaware, Shawnee, Ottawa, Ojibwa, Potawatomi, Wea, Miami, Kickapoo, Piankeshaw, Kaskaskia. TANNER:69-70

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:45:15 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28071
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28071


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

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People
None.
The Virginia expedition was a move to forestall anticipated aggression by Shawnees who were angered over continued advance of settlers into the traditional hunting grounds in present West Virginia and Kentucky. In the treaty at Camp Charlotte in 10/74, the Shawnee leaders agreed to recognize the Ohio River boundry between Indian and colonial settlement, accepting the line set by the Iroquois at the Treaty of Fort Stanwix in 1768. TANNER 68

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:45:45 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28072
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28072


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

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People
None.
Villages 1774-94: On the Wabash, below Vincennes, two unnamed, occupied 1788-89. West of the Mississippi, one unnamed near Capt Girardeau (1793), Chillicothe 6 (1787) a little north, and another unnamed in between (1793). Another west of the Mississippi at Big Shawnee Springs (1884-94) near New Bourbon; another on the Missouri across from St. Charles, called Rogerstown (1787?). TANNER:93

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:46:28 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28073
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28073


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

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People
None.
Villages 1782-1786: on tributaries of the upper Great Miami. On Loramie Creek, from south to north: Piqua 3, Chillicothe 3, Wills (all established 1782), and above Loramies Trading Post. On Greenville Creek, an unnamed village (1782). On Mad River, from south to north: Wapakoneta 1, Piqua 4, Mequashake 2, Kispoko 2, Blue Jackets 2, Wapatomica 2 (1782-86). And north, on St. Mary's River, a tributary of the northward flowing Maumee, Girtys/Chillicothe 4 (1783). TANNER:85

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:46:57 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28074
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28074


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

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People
None.
SHAWNEE Villages c.1810: Four shown on the upper Great Miami, including Wapakoneta, and Lewis Reed [?]. Another at Prophet's Town (Tippecanoe) on the Wabash. And Rogerstown between the fork of the Bourbeuse and Meramec rivers, south of the Missouri. TANNER:99

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:47:23 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28075
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28075


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

Keywords
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People
None.
SHAWNEE Villages Circa 1768: Three villages on the upper Muskingum in an area designated as generally Delaware, nearby nine of ten Delaware villages. Seven villages on the Scioto, including Chillicothe and Slower Shawnee town, in a general area designated Shawnee, that included the Great and Little Miami watersheds, the lowere Scioto (upper Scioto was Wyandot territory), and the south side of the Ohio, from the mouth of the Kentucky to Point Pleasant. TANNER:59

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:47:47 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28076
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28076


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

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People
None.
SHAWNEE Attacks on villages: 1774, McDonald on village on Muskingum during Dunmore's War. 1786, Logan on Shawnee, Mingo, and Wyandot villages on the upper Miami. 1787, on village on the Scioto. 1790, Harmar, on Shawnee, Delaware, Miami villages on the upper Wabash. TANNER:72

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:48:08 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28077
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28077


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

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People
None.
SHAWNEE Villages, c. 1830. Shawnee Reservation shown in the Auglaze area of the upper Maumee with villages of Hog Creek and Wapakoneta. From 1818-31. TANNER:134, 165.

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:48:30 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28078
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28078


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

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People
None.
SHAWNEE Villages had their maximum populations during summer planting and harvesting season. In the late fall villagers split into smaller groups to depart for winter hunting camps, then moved to maple groves for sugar making in the early spring, often taking in a short-term spring fish run before returning to plant corn. In mid-winter the village site might be entirely vacant fbut for elderly people left behind with dried food, who served as caretakers during the four-month hunt. TANNER:5

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:48:54 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28079
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28079


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

Keywords
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People
None.
SHAWNEE Large council houses 100 feet in length were conspicuous in the Wyandot and Shawnee towns of Ohio. They frequently built log cabins, some even with glazed windows and stone fireplaces. By the early nineteenth century these made Indian and American communities look very similiar. Villages were surrounded with stock: horses, cattle, hogs. Many dogs. TANNER:5

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:49:15 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28080
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28080


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

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People
None.
The region of the Great Lakes was a dynamic intertribal environment. Although resident peoples spoke three major languages -- Algonquian, Iroquoian, and Siouan -- most were Algonquians, and although not all Algonquian languages were mutually intelligible, as a general rule, an Algonquian language "could carry a traveler across more than a thousand miles of land from east to west." Many Indians were conversant in several languages, and leaders acquired considerably facility in French, but were less acquainted with English. Interpreters served an important function. TANNER:3-4

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:49:40 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28081
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28081


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

Keywords
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People
None.
SHAWNEE Villages Seventeenth century: on the Ohio River, at the mouth of the Great Miami (2 villages) and Little Miami (3); all occupied from before 1641 to c. 1670. TANNER:33

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:50:03 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28082
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28082


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

Keywords
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People
None.
SHAWNEE Villages Pontaic's War, 1763-64. Two villages shown on the upper Scioto: Lower Shawnee to the south, Shawnee Salt Licks to the north. TANNER:50

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:50:20 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28083
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28083


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

Keywords
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People
None.
SHAWNEE Villages, War of 1812. Three shown in the upper Great Miami, upper Maumee area. TANNER:107

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:50:40 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28084
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28084


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

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None.
SHAWNEE Villages, c. 1870. One shown in Ohio, north of Blue Creek, on the Ohio, between the Scioto and Brush Creek. Another shown in Indiana, near Greenfield, called Blue River. TANNER:177

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:50:58 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28085
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28085


1987

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

Keywords
None.
People
None.
SHAWNEES Indian population for the entire Great Lakes region given as 60,000. Shawnees at 1,000. Miami-Wea-Piankeshaw 4,000. Mingo 600. Potawatomi 3,000. Wyandot 1,000.

File: GTLKS.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 12:51:22 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28086
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28086


1966

Helen Hornbeck Tanner, ed., ATLAS OF GREAT LAKES INDIAN HISTORY (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1987).

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None.
People
None.
John C. Foard, South River NC to LCD, 10/10/1883: <Mr. Boone [DB?] after leaving Boone's Foard settled for a short time west of Mocksville at or Near Mr. John Milligans plase. . . . Boone's Locality was 1 1/2 mile east of South of Rowlands Crump's plase; about three hundred yards from the River, where the bottom & hill lands united. . . . Mr. Th'os J. Deadman says his impression is that Mr. Boone left his family at the Mulligan plase went to Kentucky and afterwards returned for his family. . . . Deadman farther says his farther Thomas migrated to this county in 1763 and lived 2 1/2 miles from Boone and has hard him speak often of Boone.> Quoted, with no reference number, in "'The Daniel Boone Homeplace' Davidson County NC: A Report from the Department of Archives and History to the Historic Sites Advisory Committee, April 25, 1966":Appendix B.

File: HSAC.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 11:47:31 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20648-28399
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20648-28399














    

SourceNotes
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