William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

1989

William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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John Coburn: Born in Pennsylvania, well educated, trained as a lawyer. Moved to Lexington in 1784 where he was a merchant, then appointed to the bench, serving as a Kentucky judge until 1805. In that year he was appointed a judge of the superior court of the Territory of Louisiana by President Jefferson. On his assumption of the bench he found a hodgepodge of laws combining English, French, Spanish, and American usage, a bewildering maze of statues that was totally inadequate for the needs of a rapidly growing territory. Coburn had strong local backing to suceed Lewis as governor in 1809. Howard was appointed by President Madison, but Madison appointed him to be Collector of Revenue for the Fourth District of Kentucky instead. In 1813 he joined the staff of Governor Shelby. He died in 1823. William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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    Created: 8/14/2017 1:01:16 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20650-28097
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20650-28097


1989

William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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In 2/1812 a band of Kickapoos or Potawatomis murdered nine members of a family on Salt River in the St. Charles district. Governor Howard recommended a full-scale campaign against the "marauding savages." He authorized the formation of a company of mounted riflemen to act as rangers, with Captain Nathan Boone in command. They advanced to the northern frontier, patrolling from the Salt River on the Mississippi to Loutre Creek on the Missouri. Boone was described by one of his contemporaries as "a remarkable woodsman who could climb like a bear and swim like a duck." He was very popular. He directed the construction of Fort Mason on the Mississippi, fifteen miles above the Salt River, near present-day Hannibal. The MISSOURI GAZETTE of St. Louis praised Boone's rangers "as fine a body of hardy woodsmen as ever took the field." Many reenlisted when he reorganized the company in June of 1812. William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989):221

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    Created: 8/14/2017 1:01:56 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20650-28098
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20650-28098


1989

William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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August 1808 General William Clark set out to establish Fort Osage, about 300 miles upstream from the Mississippi. He traveled overland with a company of mounted dragoons from the St. Charles district under the command of Capt. Nathan Boone. As the structures began to take shape, Clark dispatched Boone and the metis interpreter Paul Loise to the Osage towns to inform the Osages of his arrival and invite them to take up residence near the fort. William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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    Created: 8/14/2017 1:02:29 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20650-28099
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20650-28099


1989

William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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St. Louis during the period of American penetration: amalgam of races, classes, nationalities. Blacks and whites, Indian men and women, Kentucky hunters, cultivated French merchants and Creole businesswomen, illiterate boatmen, metis hunters, Yankee lawyers, mechanics, and the usual frontier ne'er-do-wells and idlers. William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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    Created: 8/14/2017 1:03:05 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20650-28100
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20650-28100


1989

William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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Sac raiding parties destroyed Nathan Boone's saltworks in central Missouri in the fall of 1805 as part of a series of raids against Americans that included the killing of hunters and the driving off of cattle. William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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    Created: 8/14/2017 1:03:33 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20650-28101
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20650-28101


1989

William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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Edward Hempstead: arrived on foot in St. Louis in 1804, carrying his belongings in a bundle slung over his shoulder. He settled in St. Charles and devoted much of his time to studying French. In 1805 he moved to St. Louis and began the practice of law. His courtroom oratory was so successful that other lawyers attempted to imitate his sharp speaking style, and he emerged as the rising star in the Missouri bench and bar. He married a local Creole woman, and became a spokesman for the old order. He was chosen in 1809 as one of the spokesmen for disgruntled land claimants, to draft a memorial to Congress seeking more favorable terms for confirmation. In 1812, with the backing of the Creoles, he was elected the first non-voting delegate from the territory to Congress. In Washington he pressed for military support in the territory and was instrumental in getting the support necessary for Nathan Boone's company of rangers. William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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    Created: 8/14/2017 1:03:59 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20650-28102
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20650-28102


1989

William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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The government of the District of Louisiana was begun without fanfare on 10/1/1804. It was superceded by a new territorial law of 3/3/1805 that established the Territory of Louisiana, and an accompanying land law that established regular procedures for the confirmation of land claims. The board of commissioners held its first session on 12/1/1805 in St. Louis. Because of a dispute between those favoring a liberal policy toward the grants (Penrose and Donaldson) and those wishing a strict adherance to the law (Carr and Lucas), the deliberations of the board were stymied, and actually suspended after the fall of 1806. After having the strict interpretations confirmed by Gallatin, the board issued their first formal decisions on 12/8/1808, but the progress was slot. By 2/1/1810 they had recorded more than 3000 claims, but issued certificates of confirmation on only 323, and rejected 139. Final report of 1/1812: examined over 3000 claims, confirmed 1342. Outlined various claims which the law had not allowed them to confirm but which they recommended Congress grant with new legislation. Congress acted speedily, adopting a bill a month later. An additional law of 4/1814 confirmed most of the concessions made prior to 1804, except those judged fraudulent. But even then the clamor for allowing all claims continued. William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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    Created: 8/14/2017 1:04:25 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20650-28103
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20650-28103


1989

William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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The cession of Louisiana to the US produced a wave of speculative activity within the territory. Confident of rising values, speculators began to accumulate as many private land claims as possible, even before the US had taken formal control. William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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    Created: 8/14/2017 1:05:25 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20650-28104
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20650-28104


1989

William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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The method for acquiring completed title was so complicated that few residents went to the trouble. To secure a concession, the settler submitted a petition to the local commandant asking for a grant of land, sometimes specifically described; if he approved, the commandant endorsed the petition and sent it to the lieutenant governor, who issued the concession; he then ordered a survey, although these were frequently never completed. If it was made, the survey plat and concession had to be presented at the proper office in New Orleans for final confirmation of title. William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989):99

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    Created: 8/14/2017 1:05:49 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20650-28105
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20650-28105


1989

William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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SYNDIC was the same as a commandant, but of smaller and more remote settlements. He served as judge in civil matters involving small amounts, commanded the local militia, issued permits to travel in the province, sought to maintain friendly relations with the local Indians, recommended individuals for land grants, encouraged the development of the area under his jurisdiction, and kept his superiors informed of local happenings. He was a local baron, usually the largest landowner in the settlement. The system of justice was simple, direct, paternalistic; the right of trial by jury did not exist. He resolved most disputes without formal judicial proceedings. There were no elections; all officials were appointed. But there were no fees or taxes either. It was an authoritan framework, but with a mildly liberal practice. Local problems were usually fairly and quickly settled. William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989):98-99

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    Created: 8/14/2017 1:06:14 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20650-28106
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20650-28106


1989

William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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St. Charles was founded in 1769 by fur traders, and when Boone arrived in remained a frontier town composed mostly of traders and hunters. In 1796 a French traveler described it: "St. Charles contains about 100 or 125 ill-constructed houses: the inhabitants do not till the ground, though it be extremely fertile; the ordinary occupations are hunting and trading with the Indians; a few hire themselves out as rowers, and it would be difficult to find a collection of individuals more ignorant, stupid, ugly, and miserable." The population was 614 in 1800. Fifty miles upriver was the tiny French village of La Charette, first settled in 1797. William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989):87

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    Created: 8/14/2017 1:06:49 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20650-28107
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20650-28107


1989

William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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DMB first visited the St. Charles region while on a hunting and land exploring trip in the fall of 1797. At his father's request he conferred with Lieutenant Governor Trudeau about his family's prospects for securing a land grant. Trudeau sent DMB home with a letter offering a 1000 arpent tract on the Femme Osage, 20 miles upstream from St. Charles, and additionally promising 600 arpents of land to other American families who joined the Boones. William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989):88

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    Created: 8/14/2017 1:07:18 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20650-28108
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20650-28108


1989

William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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DMB, DB/RBB, Hays, Callaway, NB/Olive. Boones soon surrounded by children, grandchildren, nieces, nephews, and friends. In 1800 Delassus appointed the family patriarch to be syndic of the Femme Osage district. Other Americans scattered themselves similarily along the lower Cuivre and Salt rivers. William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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    Created: 8/14/2017 1:07:45 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20650-28109
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20650-28109


1989

William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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In addition, other settlements at Charette, Loutre Island, Cote sans Dessein, Boonslick by 1811. William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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    Created: 8/14/2017 1:08:07 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20650-28110
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20650-28110


1989

William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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The destruction of Shawnee towns during the Revolutionary war caused a good deal of migration to Spanish territory. One band settled 150 miles west of St. Louis on the Meramec River. Two other towns on the St. Francis River. Louis Lorimier, the metis trader who had participated in the capture of Boone, and had nearly lost his life during Clark's invasion of 1782, led 1200 Shawnees and 600 Delawares to three towns the Apple Creek region south of Ste. Genevieve. The Shawnees made a concerted effort to live in peace with their neighbors; probably had the most difficulty with native Indians. They were farmers and hunters, practicing a form of domestic economy much like the arriving Americans. Elizabeth Musick, describing the band that lived on the Meramec: "The Indians were kind." Shawnee women made baskets and moccasins and sold them locally. The men often hunted with Americans, and served frequently as guides for the rangers, including Nathan Boone's company. Complaining of the decline of game, the Meramac Shawnee men petitioned Clark for permission to mine lead in the vicinity of their village, and on approval began operations on a tract reserved for their use. There was frequent intermarriage. The eldest daughter of James Rogers, a mixed-blood Shawnee chief, married two white husbands in sucession, and his son rejected a proposal of marriage from a white woman he found solvenly and untidy. William Clark characterized them as "a peaceable and well disposed people, of great service to our frontier settlements." But they had trouble from claim jumpers who invaded their lands, and had to seek assistance from US officals. William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989):217

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    Created: 8/14/2017 1:08:54 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20650-28111
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20650-28111


1989

William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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Proposals within the Spanish government for accepting American settlers in Louisiana/Missouri began in the 1780s. The notion was that Westerners were not strongly attached to the United States, and could over time accept Spanish ways and religion. One of the promoters of this idea was James Wilkinson, who was in the employ of the Spanish authorities in New Orleans. But only a handful of Americans settled across the Mississippi before the mid-1790s. In 1796 and '97 the Spanish commandants of Upper Louisiana circulated handbills in the US outlining the advantages of settling across the Mississippi and offering liberal land grants and no taxes to those willing to move. The Spanish were expecting war with Britain, and saw this as a way of strengthening their buffer colony. Emigrants began to pour in as early as the fall of 1796. William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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    Created: 8/14/2017 1:09:18 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20650-28112
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20650-28112


1989

William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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Hearing rumors of Spanish invitations to American settlers, Thomas Jefferson said in 1791: "I wish a hundred thousand of our inhabitants would accept the invitation. It may be the means of delivering to us peaceably what may otherwise cost a war. In the meantime we may complain of this seduction of our inhabitants just enough to make them believe it very wise policy for them, and confirm them in it." William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989):61

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    Created: 8/14/2017 1:09:37 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20650-28113
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20650-28113


1989

William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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Zenon Trudeau, lieutenant governor of Upper Louisiana from 1792-99. His sucessor, Charles Dehault Delassus, the son of a French aristocrat who joined the Spanish service in 1782, became commandant of New Madrid in 1796, and served as lieutenant governor of Upper Louisiana from 1799 to American acquisition in 1804. After the outbreak of the French Revolution he was joined in Missouri by his family. William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989):66-67

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    Created: 8/14/2017 1:09:55 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20650-28114
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20650-28114


1989

William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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By 1804 Americans constituted 3/5ths of the 10,000 inhabitants of Upper Louisiana. William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989):78

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    Created: 8/14/2017 1:10:40 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20650-28115
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20650-28115


1989

William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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Missouri population from 25,000 in 1814 to 66,000 in 1820. St. Charles had shed its primitive appearance with a long and handsome row of spacious neat brick buildings. William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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    Created: 8/14/2017 1:11:11 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20650-28116
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20650-28116


1989

William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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Missouri 1810 3000; 1820 10000. William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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    Created: 8/14/2017 1:11:47 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20650-28117
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20650-28117


1989

William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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Constitutional convention: delegates elected in 5/1820; one of 41 from the fifteen counties. All the delegates supported slavery. William E. Foley, THE GENESIS OF MISSOURI: FROM WILDERNESS OUTPOST TO STATEHOOD (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1989)

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    Created: 8/14/2017 1:12:04 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20650-28118
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20650-28118














    

SourceNotes
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