Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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<When the Shawnees first crossed the sea, the Great spirit told them to go to Shawnee river, which was the centre of this Island. That the earth had not yet a heart as all men and animals had & that he would put them, the Shawnees, at Shawnee river for the heart of the Earth. From there he told them that they would go to Weeyukewaa wee Theepee, Mad River (a literal translation) and thence to the Mississippi, where they would remain a short time and where they would discover something coming towards them (the whites), which would make them very poor and miserable. They moved to the Mississippi where they saw the prediction verified. In all these travels they took with them the sacred fire, and now they see the settlements of the whites progressing so rapidly that they look forward to a time when it will be necessary for them to endeavour to retransmit the fire to Shawnee river. Twelve men will be deputed to carry this fire, who, when they have arrived at Shawnee river, will open the fire and put to the test the power of the whites. If it be foreordained that every thing is to belong to the whites, in four years the fire will become visible to all the world. They the Indians grown desperate by a consciousness that their end is approaching will suffer the fire to burn and to destroy the whites, upon whom they will call, tauntingly, to quench it. The same persons who have now the care of the fire at the Mississippi will be the bearers of it to Shawnee river. Twelve days (years) after the destruction of the world by this fire the Great spirit will cause it to be reformed & repeopled, but they don't know what description of persons will inhabit it.> Account from information derived from the Shawnee Prophet at Detroit in 1824. TROWBRIDGE:55-56

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:48:22 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28273
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28273


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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Tradition of European contact; account of Trowbridge from information derived from the Shawnee Prophet at Detroit in 1824: <They first saw the whites upon their landing on the sea coast near Philadelphia. They were not astonished to see them, as their forefathers had been told of their comin, before they came down to the Island; and when they landed they were waited upon by the great chiefs of the nation. The whites brought from the vessel a chair, and after becoming a little familiar with the Indians they begged a piece of land to place the chair upon. A request so reasonable was readily granted, notwithstanding some of the old men had predicted much unhappiness as the consequence of the arrival of the whites. When they obtained permission to seat themselves they took out the bottom of the chair, which was composed of very small cords, and they surrounded the land with it, so as to make quite a large tract, telling the Indians that such was the customary way among THEM. After remaining some time among them they departed and in the following year they returned, when their numbers had considerably increased. The great captain of this second band complained to the Indians of the smallness of the first grant and solicited the privilege of another, large enough to hold his Bulls hide which lay at his feet. Many of the Indians opposed the second grant and reasoned strongly from experience, but the minority were so clamorous that at length the others gave way and permission was given. Immediately the Bulls hide was put into water and soaked, when it was cut into a small cord and thus used to measure the land. The Shawnese finding themselves tricked a second time resolved to submit, but determined that they would never be again deceived. They say that no other nation was with them upon the arrival of the whites, notwithstanding the Wyandots & Delawares both tell the same story in substance.> Editor's note: <This tale is of Old World origin.> TROWBRIDGE:10
File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:49:00 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28274
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28274


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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<There are female chiefs also appointed, as well for war as for peace. These are always the mothers or otherwise nearly related to the principal chiefs whose party they belong to. Their duties are not numerous nor arduous. The principal employment of the PEACE WOMAN is by her entreaties & remonstrances to prevent the unnecessary effusion of blood; and if a War chief is bent upon prosecuting some undertaking not countenanced by the nation, the council chiefs aply to the peace woman, who goes to the War chief, and setting before him the care and anxiety & pain which the women experience in their birth & education she appeals to his better feelings and implores him to spare the innocent & unoffending against whom his hand is raised. She seldom fails to disuade him, and in consequence of her general influence & success in such cases, is made a DERNIER RESORT by the village chiefs. Besides this duty these female chiefs have a general superintendence of the female affairs of the village; they order & direct the planting and the cooking & arrangement of feats. But in the performance of the latter duty the war & peace women chiefs have separate establishments, at one of which the latter cooks the white corn & smaller vegetables & at the other fir first superintends the preparation of the meats & coarser articles of food.> Account from information derived from the Shawnee Prophet at Detroit in 1824. TROWBRIDGE:12-13

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:52:21 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28275
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28275


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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1: <The question of war is determined in a general council of War & peace chiefs, where, after the latter have in a few words expressed their general sentiments on the subject, the principal War Chief, who is of the Panther tribe, rises and declares the necessity of resorting to war for redress of their injuries, and then calls upon all of his own tribe to join him in raising the tomahawk. This done, is a signal of assent by all, to his proposition, the village chiefs surrender their power, the war chiefs immediately set about the preparations and the different tribes are invited to join the party. This is done by sending a tomahawk painted with red clay, through the different villages. All who see this tomahawk and are disposed to join the party, set out directly for the village of the Chief, where a grand council is held & further measures adopted for the expedition. Redress is something demanded before a declaration of war, but after such declaration no notice of it is given to the opposite party, as secrecy in movement is considered indispensible to their success.> Account from information derived from the Shawnee Prophet at Detroit in 1824. TROWBRIDGE:17-18 continued

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:52:58 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28276
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28276


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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2: <The war dance always precedes their departure from the village and the leader declares to his followers the general order of march, the plan of attack &c. but not feast is held until they approach the enemy -- when the young hunters procure twelve deer, which are roasted at night, and on the following morning they partake. At this feast the leader addresses them & enforces the necessity of vigilance, activity & courage, commonly using such arguments as these -- "My brothers! -- the Enemy is at hand. We must fight. Retreat would be disgraceful. We shall conquer if we are brave. The water will wash them away, the wind will blow them down, darkness will come upon them, & the earth will cover them. Let us go forward together & we shall succeed." They march together in single file, the chief warrior at the head, singing the War song to enliven the march. At night the leader & the warriors of his tribe encamp considerably in advance of the main body. The encampment is made in an oblong form by placing a row of forked sticks on each side of the fire & upon these forks laying poles, against which they recline themselves. They never sleep in a horizontal position in such cases. The guns & ammunition are placed at their heads against the poles & each man watches as he sleeps. The encampment is always made crosswise of the path or road. The principal War Chief determines the question of battle, and arranges the plan of operations. These are generally simple. The movements correspond with their general character. Ambuscades & other cautionary motions attend the approach to the enemy, and when very near, they are exhorted by their chief to conduct themselves with prudence & firmness and to await the concerted signal (generally a gun from one end of the line) for the general attack. In battle there is no maneuvering other than such as is dictated by circumstances. The termination of a battle is followed by a speech of gratulation from the leader, who calls up the Chief Warrior of the Wolf tribe to lead the party in their return home. Thus they march, with the Panther tribe in the rear, attended by the prisoners, to their village.> Account from information derived from the Shawnee Prophet at Detroit in 1824. TROWBRIDGE:18-19 continued

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:53:30 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28277
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28277


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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3: <When they get near the village the leader despatches a messenger to the principal village chief informing him of the approach of the party. This chief communicates the information to the principal peace woman, who prepares a feast for the warriors. When they reach the village they sound the War whoop, which brings out all the boys & young people, armed with sticks, who attack the prisoners & beat them until they reach the Council House. They there tie the prisoners to a post and the great War Woman strips them & gives them a scrutinizing examination. She then addresses her children, the Warriors, & thanks them for the "good meat" which they have brought her. Then one of the Peace Chiefs nters the Council House with a drum & a gourd, and having declared the custom of their forefathers to dance on such occasions, he begins to beat the drum and sing the War song. The WArriors join the dance, being stripped almost naked and at length become entirely so, dancing at intervals among the crowds of women that attend, who quickly disperse at sight of so much obscenity as is evinced in their appearance and gestures. This dance continues from the time of their arrival, which is always in the morning, until night, and at intervals of cessation during the day each of the warriors strikes a post which is placed in the circle, and recounts his feats of bravery in that or other battles in which he has been engaged. After the dance is ended the warriors repose themselves in the Council House and on the following morning they are addressed by the chief, and directed to remain at the House for the period of four days, during which they drink strong decoctions of medicinal roots, prepared for them, and abstain from eating more food than is absolutely necessary for their comfortable subsistence. At the expiration of the four days they separate & return to their families. The reason assigned for this abstinence & use of medicine is, that during their absence they drink a great deal of a strong decoction of roots which infuse a spirit of energy & strength, and that if they enjoyed connection with their wives before counteracting the effect of this medicine by some other, the consequences would be fatal to them. . . . Before going into battle the warriors secrete their clothes and useless articles of travelling baggage, some miles from the place of action, and in case of a defeat they make this a rallying point from which they return to the village, where they pass four days, as before mentioned, in the Council house, but without any feasting or dancing. . . . The women do not accompany the men to war, that is, they are not in the practice of doing so. Instances of their attendance are very rare.> Account from information derived from the Shawnee Prophet at Detroit in 1824. TROWBRIDGE:19-20,22 continued

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:54:05 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28278
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28278


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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4: <The prisoners are given by the chiefs to such persons in the village as manifest a desire to have their services, or they are adopted as among other nations. . . . The custom of burning prisoners was not entirely done away at the commencement of the late war [War of 1812]. The Prophet was an eye witness to one of these scenes about a year after the battle of Tippecanoe [ca 1812]. A white man was taken by the Kickapoos and burned to avenge the death of one of the principal Chiefs who was killed in that battle. When the warriors had taken the prisoner and had painted him black they conducted him to the village, where they were received with shouts of joy by all who awaited their arrival. He was there confined one night, and on the following morning they proceeded with him to a place prepared about three miles west of the village. Here a green white oak sapling was stuck into the ground, and to the end, about 20 feet from the ground, a grape vine was attached, this vine came down so far that the arms of the prisoner, when extended could be attached to it. After some time spent in perfect silence the prisoner was conducted to the sapling and his arms were made fast to the vine. Then the tormentors set up their terrible yell, which they repeated four times, after which each of them took a brand of fire from a large fire previously kindled, and applying it to the sufferer, the pain would compel him to jump from his place, when the elasticity of the pole would immediately swing him back to his original position or near it, where the Indians stood ready, with fresh brands to continue the torture. Thus he was continued in the most excruciating pain, from sun rise until past noon, when he died. He was then skinned & quartered, and his limbs were boiled for a feast, and distributed among the spectators. A young man who is now here with the Prophet, says that he was at that time quite a boy, but he recollects very well that he ate a piece of the body for venison, and thought it good. The Prophet says he has seen other prisoners burned, . . . [and] in all cases . . . no fire was enkindled to hasten the death of the victim, but they were compelled to endure the torture of these brands. Prisoners thus painted black before entering a village never escape the death appointed them, unless they are met and claimed before their arrival, by the great peace woman.> Account from information derived from the Shawnee Prophet at Detroit in 1824. TROWBRIDGE:20-21 continued

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:54:55 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28279
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28279


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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5: <The young men begin to bear arms in war at the age of 15, and, to use the language of the Prophet, "they cease only in death." They never used defensive armour -- always relying upon the aid of their tutelar god to protect them. And if any who were reputed brave, met death in battle the Indians acknowledged themselves mistaken & such persons were set down as cowards, because it would have been impossible to kill them had they possessed true courage. Besides this they depend much upon their war medicine, which makes them at times invisible to their enemies, or gives them power to elude them. They are generally accompanied by one of the medicine men, who has his bag of valuables always with him. . . . This medicine man is not only a juggler, but a practical attendant upon the wounded, who are taken from the field of battle by their nearest comrades, as soon as they are disabled. Removed some distance from the fighting ground the wounded person is immediately waited upon by his physician, who probes his wound with a feather of the turkey buzzard dipped into a decoction prepared for the purpose. Other medicines are administered internally and the recovery of the patient is speedy. They have the fullest confidence in the powers of these medicine men & believe that if a man was shot through the body without breaking any bones, his cure could always be effected, unless circumstances should prevent a speedy operation by the Doctor. . . . The cause of general war between nations has lmost always been found in individual murders, which have been so often repeated on both sides as to embroil the whole of the tribe & at length the nation en masse. Disputed boundaries have never occasioned any difficulty among them or their neighbors.> Account from information derived from the Shawnee Prophet at Detroit in 1824. TROWBRIDGE:22-23

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:56:09 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28280
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28280


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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<Of late years it has been very common for them to live together withou being married, as there is no particular form of courtship or marriage. Every couple nowadays connect themselves & separate, as suits their convenience or inclination. They seldom reach manhood without connecting themselves in this manner, but notwithstanding this general custom they are not destitute of old bachelors & old maids, whose private character, personal appearance or want of desire, prevent them from uniting with the opposite sex. As no woman is regularly married in these days, her reputation is not affected by having children, whose father is not generally known -- for any intimacy is construed for the time into a state of matrimony & the reputed father seldom denies his offspring.> Account from information derived from the Shawnee Prophet at Detroit in 1824. TROWBRIDGE:33

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:56:52 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28281
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28281


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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<Until some thirty or forty years ago [1780s-90s], it was the duty of the women, to perform all the labour properly belonging to the other sex among the whites. They planted & hoes the corn, gathered & dried it, dressed the meat, carried the game, constructed lodges, removed the encampments & replaced them when necessary, and in shor, took from the husband every care attendant upon their situation, while he employed himself in the chase, or in the enjoyment of the society of his friends. But now a days, the husband assists his wife in all things necessary to their comfortable existence, with the exception of carrying wood for fires, which is considered the particular duty of women.> Account from information derived from the Shawnee Prophet at Detroit in 1824. TROWBRIDGE:33-34

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:57:10 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28282
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28282


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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<It is quite common for the husband to strike his wife for slight causes, particularly if she be possessed of an ungovernable temper. And frequently the wife retaliates, by pulling his hair, or his testicles, that latter of which they most generally resort to. . . . They appear to have diffidence in their mutual intercourse, and strangers very seldom witness any evidences of affection between a man & his wife. On the contrary the Indian prides himself upon controulling his feelings and manifesting a perfect indifference to his wife, in the presence of others. But they entertain very strong affections, notwithstanding these appearances. The government of the children in most cases is divided between the father & mother. The former corrects the boys & the latter instructs & governs the girls, whom she frequently punishes for their faults. The husband too extends his corrections to the females, but the wife seldom interferes with the conduct of her sons, choosing generally to refer their conduct to the father. . . . The management of household affairs is committed to the women exclusively, and they often assist their husbands in trading, but they cannot be considered as the heads of the families in fact, for the husband has power to suggest any alteration which may please him, in domestic discipline, and the wife must conform to it without a murmur.> Account from information derived from the Shawnee Prophet at Detroit in 1824. TROWBRIDGE:34-35

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:58:29 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28283
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28283


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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Account from information derived from the Shawnee Prophet at Detroit in 1824. TROWBRIDGE:36

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:59:07 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28284
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28284


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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Seasons: Spring/Meloakamee (4/15 to 7/15); Summer/Paalarkee (7/15 to 10/15); Autumn/Tukwaukee (10/15 to 1/15); Winter/Pepoanwee (1/15 to 4/15); Commencement of Spring/Skeemeloakamaathee; Middle of Summer/Lauee Pelauwee; Middle of Winter/Lauee Pepoanwee. The Twelve Moons: April/Poaskweethar (no translation); May/Oataaheemeenee Keesthwau (Strawberry Moon); June/Miskartee Keesohthwau (Rasberry Moon); July/Meenee'Keesthwau (Blackberry Moon); August/Poakarmauwee Keesthwau (Plumb Moon); September/Seeminee Keesthwau (Papaw Moon); October/Keenee Keesthwau (Long Moon); November/Wauseelauthau (Eccentric Moon -- because the weather is so changeable); December/Haukwee Keesthwau (Hard Moon, cold weather); January/Hautaa Keesthwau (Crow Moon); February/ Skoopeeaa Keesthwau (no translation); March/Hauhtaa Pukeneethar (no translation). East/Wastohkoathakee (where the sun rises); West/Pokseemoakee (the sun alights); North/Paapoane Kee kee (winter side); South/Larwau Kwaakee (half way -- alluding to the sun at noon). Account from information derived from the Shawnee Prophet at Detroit in 1824. TROWBRIDGE:38-39

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:59:38 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28285
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28285


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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Account from information derived from the Shawnee Prophet at Detroit in 1824. TROWBRIDGE:39

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 5:00:04 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28286
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28286


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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Account from information derived from the Shawnee Prophet at Detroit in 1824. TROWBRIDGE:40-41

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 5:01:42 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28287
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28287


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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Account from information derived from the Shawnee Prophet at Detroit in 1824. TROWBRIDGE:46-47

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 5:02:18 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28288
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28288


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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Account from information derived from the Shawnee Prophet at Detroit in 1824. TROWBRIDGE:47

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 5:03:24 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28289
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28289


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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Attempt to adopt stoic character. Account from information derived from the Shawnee Prophet at Detroit in 1824. TROWBRIDGE:47

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 5:04:00 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28290
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28290


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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<They prepare their first meal about day light, and eat it about sun rise, immediately after which the kettle is filled for dinner. This meal is eaten about twelve o'clock, and if no more was cooked than necessary for the time, the kettle is put over the fire again. They have no regular time for eating after dinner, but from that time until they lay down to rest at night they are directed by their appetite. From morning until bed time they endeavour to keep something ready cooked, and when any person comes in, tho' he may be the nearest neighbour, they always offer him something to eat.> Account from information derived from the Shawnee Prophet at Detroit in 1824. TROWBRIDGE:49

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 5:04:43 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28291
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28291


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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A Society among them, the Miseekwaaweekwaakee headed by four women, but to which men also belonged. (here I eliminate the Shawnee words) "Thank you my children you bring me good Broth," Account from information derived from the Shawnee Prophet at Detroit in 1824. TROWBRIDGE:53-54

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 5:05:10 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28292
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28292


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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<Before their removal from the sea shore, they disposed of a tract of country by treaty with the whites, but how much, or at what place, they cannot recollect. At this treaty they called the whites their brothers, and they there intimated their belief that the whites would become very populous, and would forget the kindness of their red bretheren.> Account from information derived from Black Hoof at Detroit in the 1820s. TROWBRIDGE:63

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 5:05:46 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28293
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28293


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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None.

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 5:06:18 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28294
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28294


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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Chiefs hereditary; at his death a council of old men choose as sucessor a son whose general character entitled him to the respect of the nation. Village chiefs and war chiefs, the latter considered more important & more honorable, and is received as the reward of great talents, exertion and bravery. To be a War Chief a man should have led at least four successive war parties into enemy country, whould each time have taken at least one scalp. Account from information derived from the Shawnee Prophet at Detroit in 1824. TROWBRIDGE:11-12

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 5:06:44 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28295
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28295


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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Term the Delawares their grandfathers, the Wyandots their elder brothers, the Miamis, Ottawas, and Pottawatamies their younger brothers, the Chippeways their youngest brothers; the Kickapoos their first brothers, Foxes second brothers, and those more distant as simply "brothers." The Iroquois known as cousins. TROWBRIDGE:9

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 5:07:12 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28296
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28296


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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Their name for Americans: Er Yewatchenarkee (old) or M'simoutheekee (new), meaning Big Knives. Account from information derived from the Shawnee Prophet at Detroit in 1824. TROWBRIDGE:53

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 5:07:36 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28297
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28297


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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Enclosures called Waukauhoowaa; forts occupied by whites called Saupetaakee Waukauhoowaa if enclosed by pickets, Ausheeskee Waukauhoowaa (earth fort) when made with regular walls. Account from information derived from the Shawnee Prophet at Detroit in 1824. TROWBRIDGE:58

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 5:07:59 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28298
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28298


1939

Vernon Kinietz and Voegelin Erminie W., SHAWNESE TRADITIONS: C. C. TROWBRIDGE'S ACCOUNT(Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1939)

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None.
On the De Lisle map of 1718 the Cumberland River is designated "Riviere des anciens Chauanons ainsi nomme par ce que les Chauanons y habitoient autrefois." The Cumberland received its present name from Dr. Thomas Walker in 1760; but as late as 1770 Washington still refers to it as "Shawnee River." Editors note in TROWBRIDGE:5n

File: TRWBRDG.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 5:08:23 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20726-28299
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20726-28299














    

SourceNotes
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