AMERICAN ARCHIVES 4th series

1775

AMERICAN ARCHIVES 4th series

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<Williamsburgh, Virginia, September 30, 1775. <A company of gentlemen, of NORTH-CAROLINA, having, for a large and valuable consideration, purchased from the Chiefs of the CHEROKEE INDIANS, by and with the consent of the whole Nation, a considerable tract of their lands, now called TRANSYLVANIA, lying on the Rivers OHIO, CUMBERLAND, and LOUISA; and understanding that many people are desirious of becoming adventurers in that part of the world, and wish to know the terms on which lands in that country may be had, they therefore herby inform the publick, that any person who will settle on and inhabit the same, before the first day of JUNE, 1776, shall have the privilege of taking up and surveying for himself five hundred acres, and for each titable person he may carry with him and settle there two hundred and fifty acres, on the payment of fifty shillings sterling per hundred, subject to an yearly quit-rent of two shillings, like money, to commence in the year 1780. <Such persons as are willing to become purchasers may correspond and treat with Mr. WILLIAM JOHNSTON, in HILLSBOROUGH, and Colonel JOHN WILLIAMS, of GRANVILLE, NORTH-CAROLINA, or Colonel RICHARD HENDERSON, at BOONSBOROUGH, in TRANSYLVANIA. <This country lies on the south side of the Rivers OHIO and LOUISA, in a temperate and healthy climate. It is in general well watered with springs and rivulets, and has several rivers, up which vessels of considerable burden may come with ease. In different places of it are a number of salt springs, where the making of salt has been tried with great success, and where, with certainty, any quantity needed may be easily and conveniently made. Large tracts of the land lie on limestone, and in several places there is abundance of iron ore. The fertility of the soil and goodness of the range almost surpass belief; and it is at present well stored with buffalo, elk, deer, bear, beaver, &c., and the rivers abound with fish of various kinds. Vast crowds of people are daily flocking to it, and many gentlemen of the first rank and character have bargained for lands in it; so that there is a great appearance of rapid settlement, and that it will soon become a considerable Colony, and one of the most agreeable countries in AMERICA.> AMERICAN ARCHIVES 4th series 1:847

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20731-28339
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20731-28339


1774

AMERICAN ARCHIVES 4th series

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Virginia Assembly records: <May 12, 1774. By an express, just arrived from FINCASTLE county, we are informed that very lately three or four skirmishes happened between the white people and the SHAWANESE INDIANS. We cannot affirm what occasioned the dispute, but are told one white man had taken some small matter from the INDIANS, which irritated them to arms; but were soon repelled by the other party, who killed eleven of them, seven of which they scalped. -- Another of the INDIANS was terribly wounded in the groin, and it was imagined, when this express came away, that he could not possibly recover.> AMERICAN ARCHIVES 4th series 1:275

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20731-28340
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1774

AMERICAN ARCHIVES 4th series

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William Preston to Gov. of VA, Fincastle, 8/13/1774: <The murder of Mr. RUSSELL and five of his companions, last Fall, at no great distance from our settlements, you have already heard of. It has since appeared that the assassins were not CHEROKEES, as was then thought, but a party belonging to some of the Northern tribes. Two persons, called COCHRAN and FOLEY, and three men in company with one HAYES, were killed about the same time. . . . Sundry other people have also been murdered along the frontier parts of the neighbouring counties. The inhabitants of FINCASTLE, except those on HOLSTEIN, are chiefly gathered into small forts, also great numbers in BOTETOURT; as INDIANS are frequently seen, and their signs discovered, in the interiour parts of both counties. Such is the unhappy situation of the people that they cannot attend their plantations, nor is it in the power of the scouts and parties on duty to investigate the inroads of the enemy, as they come in small parties, and travel among the mountains with so much caution. . . . This day Captain FLOYD, one of the Surveyors, reached this place with the news that on the 8th of JULY he and three others parted with fourteen men who were also engaged in the surveying business, and went about twenty miles from them to finish his part of the work, and that they were to meet on the first of AUGUST, at a place on KENTUCKY, known by the name of the CABIN, in order to proceed on the journey homeward. On the 24th of JULY, Captain FLOYD, with his three men, repaired to the place appointed, where he found that part, and perhaps all the rest of the company, had assembled according to agreement, but had gone off in the greatest precipitation, leaving him only this notice, written on a tree, "alarmed by finding some people killed, were are gone down;" upon which Captain FLOYD, with his small party, immediately set out, steering for our settlements, and after an extreme, painful, and fatiguing journey of sixteen days, through mountains almost inaccessible, and ways unknown, he at last arrived on CLINCH River, near Captain RUSSEL'S fort.> Supplies a list of 15 surveyors still unaccounted for. AMERICAN ARCHIVES 4th series 1:707

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20731-28341
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20731-28341


AMERICAN ARCHIVES 4th series

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At the council between the Shawnees and Dunmore, at the conclusion of the Battle of Point Pleasant, in his speech to them, Dunmore recounted the depredations of the Indians against the Virginians; among them: <A few moons after they killed RUSSELL, one of my people, and five white men and two negroes, near CUMBERLAND GAP; and also carried their horses and effects into their Towns, where they were purchased by the PENNSYLVANIA traders.> AMERICAN ARCHIVES 4TH series 1:873

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AMERICAN ARCHIVES 4th series

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Proclamation of Governor Dunmore, Williamsburg, 1/23/1775: <I have received authentick accounts that the CHEROKEE Nation of INDIANS have put to death the persons of their Tribe who had been concerned in the murder of young RUSSELL, and others in company with him, which remarkable instance of their good faith and strict regard to justice, as it cannot but evince the sincere desire they entertain of living in peace and good agreement with us, so I hope will dispose all the people of this Colony to acts of beneficence towards, and a griendly intercourse with, all this part of their fellow-creatures.> AMERICAN ARCHIVES 4th series 1:1169

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