AMERICAN STATE PAPERS. PUBLIC LANDS (Washington D.C.: Gales and Seaton, 1834)

1834

AMERICAN STATE PAPERS. PUBLIC LANDS (Washington D.C.: Gales and Seaton, 1834)

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Commissioners certificates issued, 12/13/1808: Daniel Morgan Boone, 600 arpents in the Femme Osage. AMERICAN STATE PAPERS. PUBLIC LANDS (Washington D.C.: Gales and Seaton, 1834) 2:689

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20734-28344
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1834

AMERICAN STATE PAPERS. PUBLIC LANDS (Washington D.C.: Gales and Seaton, 1834)

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Land Claims in the Missouri Territory. <Colonel DANIEL BOONE. -- A claim for one thousand arpents of land, situate on Femme Osage, district of St. Charles. Produces a concession from Don Zenon Trudeau, Lieutenant Governor, dated January 24th 1798, and a certificate of survey of the same, dated January 9, 1800; also, a letter from Don Zenon Trudeau to him, dated in the year 1798, inviting him to remove, with his family, to Louisiana, with the promise of a grant of land; and also a commission from Don Charles D. Delassus, Lieutenant Governor, to him, said claimant, dated 11th July, 1800, appointing him commandant of the district of the Femme Osage. <Colonel D. Boone stated to the Board, that, on his arrival in Louisiana, he took up his residence, with his lady, at his son Daniel M. Boone's, in the said district of Femme Osage, and adjoining the lands he now claims; that they remained there until about two years ago, when he moved to a younger son's, Nthan Boone, where he now lives. It is proved that the said claimant is of the age of about seventy years, and his wife about sixty-eight. He further stated, that, having inquired of Charles D. Delassus as to the propriety of improving and settling his land within a year and a day from the date of the concession, as directed by the Spanish laws, he was informed by said Delassus, that, being commandant of the said district, he need not trouble himself about the cultivating of the same as, by the commission he held of commandant of said district, he was not considered as coming within the meaning of said laws. <TESTIMONY TAKEN. February 13, 1806. Jonathan Bryan, being duly sworn, says that he knew Colonel Daniel Boone in this country in the year 1800. <OPINION OF THE BOARD. December 1, 1809: Full Board. It is the opinion of the Board that this claim ought not to be confirmed.> AMERICAN STATE PAPERS. PUBLIC LANDS (Washington D.C.: Gales and Seaton, 1834) 2:473

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20734-28345
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AMERICAN STATE PAPERS. PUBLIC LANDS (Washington D.C.: Gales and Seaton, 1834)

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<Nathan Boone, assignee of Robert Hall. -- A claim for eight hundred arpents of land, situate on Femme Osage, district of St. Charles. Produces as a special permission to settle, a concession from Don Zenon Trudeau, Lieutenant Governor, dated January 26, 1798, to said Robert Hall, and a certificate of survey of said land, dated 10th January, 1800. <TESTIMONY TAKEN. February 3, 1806. Jonathan Bryan, being duly sworn, says that the said tract of land was settled by the above Robert Hall in December, 1799; that he, the said Hall left the country prior to 1st October, 1800, and has never returned, and that the above claimant did, prior to and on the 28th day of December, 1803, actually inhabit and cultivate the same, being then the head of a family. <August 6, 1807. Isaac Vanbibber, being duly sworn, says that, immediately after Robert Hall left said land, Nathan Boone settled on it, raised a crop in 1800, and has inhabited and cultivated it ever since. <OPINION AND REMARKS OF THE BOARD. February 13, 1806: Full Board. The Goard grant the above claimant eight hundred arpents of land, as per the above concession. <December 1, 1809: Full Board. It is the opinion of a majority of the Board that this claim ought not to be granted; Frederick Bates, commissioner, being of opinion that this claim ought to be confirmed to Rober Hall or his legal representatives, under the fourth section of the act of 1807.> AMERICAN STATE PAPERS. PUBLIC LANDS (Washington D.C.: Gales and Seaton, 1834) 2:472.

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20734-28346
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AMERICAN STATE PAPERS. PUBLIC LANDS (Washington D.C.: Gales and Seaton, 1834)

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<Nathan Boon [sic], claiming four hundred and twenty arpents of land, situate on Femme Osage; produces to the Board a concession from Charles D. Delassus, dated December 10, 1799, and a certificate of survey, dated March 28, 18-5. <July 31, 1810: Present, Lucas, Penrose, and Bates, commissioners. It is the opinion of the Board that this claim ought not to be confirmed.> AMERICAN STATE PAPERS. PUBLIC LANDS (Washington D.C.: Gales and Seaton, 1834) 2:552.

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20734-28347
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20734-28347


AMERICAN STATE PAPERS. PUBLIC LANDS (Washington D.C.: Gales and Seaton, 1834)

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<Daniel M. Boon, claiming four hundred arpents of land, situate on river Loutre, district of St. Charles; produces to the Board a concession from Charles Dehault Delassus, Lieutenant Governor, dated 18th March, 1802; a plat of survey, dated 2d Februray, and certified 28th March, 1804. <October 18, 1811: Present, full Board. It is the opinion of the Board that this claim ought not to be confirmed.> AMERICAN STATE PAPERS. PUBLIC LANDS (Washington D.C.: Gales and Seaton, 1834) 2:619.

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20734-28348
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1810

AMERICAN STATE PAPERS. PUBLIC LANDS (Washington D.C.: Gales and Seaton, 1834)

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Petiton of DB presented to the 11th Congress, 1810, 1: <GRANT TO DANIEL BOONE. COMMUNICATED TO THE SENATE, JANUARY 12, 1810. Mr. Meigs, from the committee to whom was referred the petition of Daniel Boone, together with the bill for his relief, made the following report: That, at a period antecedent to the revolutionary war, Daniel Boone, the petitioner, possessing an ardent desire for the exploration of the (then) Western wilderness of the United States, after traversing a length of mountainous and uninhabited country, discovered and, with a few bold and enterprising fellows, established, with a perilous hardihood, the first settlement of civilized population in the (now) State of Kentucky. That, in maintaining the possession of that country, until the peace of 1783, he experienced all the vicissitudes of a war with eneimies the most daring, insidious, and cruel, and which were aided by Canadians from the British provinces of Upper Canada; and that during that long contest he lost several children by the hands of the savages. That it appears to the committee, that although the petitioner was not OFFICIALLY EMPLOYED by the Government of the United States, yet that he was ACTUALLY ENGAGED against their enemies, through the whole of the war of the Revolution. That in the exploring, settling, and defending that country, he eminently contributed to the early march of the American Western population, and which has redounded to the benefit of the United States. That your petitioner is old, infirm, and, though dependent on agriculture, by adverse and unpropitious circumstances, possesses not one acre of that immeasurable territory which he so well defended, after having been the pioneer of its settlement. The petitioner disclaiming all idea of a DEMAND upon the justice of his country,yet requests, as a grateful benevolence, that Congress would grant him some reasonable portion of land in the territory of Louisiana. The committee, upon the whole circumstances of the merit and situation of the petitioner, beg leave to report the bill without amendment.> continued

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20734-28349
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1834

AMERICAN STATE PAPERS. PUBLIC LANDS (Washington D.C.: Gales and Seaton, 1834)

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Petiton of DB presented to the 11th Congress, 1810, 2: <TO THE SENATE AND REPRESENTATIVES OF THE CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES IN CONGRESS ASSEMBLED. THE PETITION OF DANIEL BOONE, AT PRESENT AN INHABITANT OF THE TERRITORY OF LOUISIANA, RESPECTUALLY SHOWETH: That, your petitioner has spent a long life in exploring the wilds of North America; and has, by his own personal exertions, been greatly instrumental in opening the road to civilization in the immense territories now attached to the United States, and, in some instances, matured into independent States. An ardent thirst for discovery, united with a desire to benefit a rising family, has impelled him to encounter the numerous hardships, privations, difficulties, and dangers to which he has unavoidably been exposed. How far his desire for discovery has been extended, and what consequences have resulted from his labors, are, at this time, unnecessary to detail. But, while your petitioner has thus opened the way to thousands, to countries possessed of every natural advantage, and although he may have gratified to excess his thirst for discovery, he has to lament that he has not derived those personal advantages which his exertions would seem to have merited. He has secured but a scanty portion of that immeasurable territory over which his discoveries have extended, and his family have reason to regret that their interest had not been more the great object of his discoveries. Your petitioner has nothing to demand from the justice of his country, but he respectfully suggests, that it might be deemed an act of gratful benevolence, if his country, amidst their bounties, would so far gratify his last wish, as to grant him some reasonable portion of land within the territory of Louisiana. He is the more induced to this request, as the favorite pittance of soil to which he conceived he had acquired a title, under the Spanish Government, has been wrested from him by a construction of the existing laws not in his contemplation, and beyond his foresight. Your petitioner is not disposed to murmur or complain; but conscious of the value and extent of his services, he solicits some evidence of their liberality. He approaches the august assemblage of his fellow-citizens with a confidence inspired by that spirit which has led him so often to the deep recesses of the wilds of America; and he flatters himself that he with his family will be induced to acknowledge that the United States knows how to appreciate and encourage the efforts of her citizens, in enterprises of magnitude, from which proportionate public good may be derived. <DANIEL BOONE.> AMERICAN STATE PAPERS. PUBLIC LANDS (Washington D.C.: Gales and Seaton, 1834) 2:10

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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1813-12-24

AMERICAN STATE PAPERS. PUBLIC LANDS (Washington D.C.: Gales and Seaton, 1834)

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Report of the House Committee on Public Lands, 1813, 1: <SPANISH GRANT TO DANIEL BOONE, CONFIRMED. COMMUNICATED TO THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, DECEMBER 24, 1813. Mr. McKee, from the Committee on the Public Lands, to whom was referred the petition of Daniel Boone, made the following report: <That the petitioner was invited by Zenon Trudeau, Lieutenant Governor of Upper Louisiana, under the Spanish Government, to remove from Kentucky; and, as an inducement to his removal, promised the petitioner a grant of land in that country. The petitioner did remove to Louisiana before the year 1798; and, on the 24th day of January, 1798, he received from Zenon Trudeau a concession for one thousand arpents of land, situated in the district of Femme Osage; had the same surveyed on the 9th of January, 1800. It further appears that the petitioner was, on the 11th of June, 1800, appointed, by Don Charles D. Delassus, then Lieutenant Governor of Upper Louisiana, commandant of the Femme Osage district, and resided in the vicinity of the land granted to him for eight or nine years, but never settled on or cultivated the same. It is alleged by the petitioner, that he failed to settle and cultivate the land granted to him in consequence of his being informed by the said Delassus that his appointment to the command of the Femme Osage district exempted him from the condition of settling and cultivating the land granted to him, a condition generally required by the Spanish laws from the citizens receiving grants of land in that country, under the Spanish Government.> continued

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-20734-28351
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20734-28351


1813

AMERICAN STATE PAPERS. PUBLIC LANDS (Washington D.C.: Gales and Seaton, 1834)

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Report of the House Committee on Public Lands, 1813, 2: <By the act of Congress of the 2d of March, 1805, authorizing the appointment of commissioners to settle and adjust the claims of persons to land in the district of Upper Louisiana, an actual settlement and cultivation of the land is required to the confirmation of a claim; and, as the petitioner did not allege that any such settlement or cultivation had taken place, the commissioners rejected his claim. It is presumed that the claim was rejected on this ground alone; inasmuch as the claim of the petitioner was good in every other respect. If, then, the appointment of the petitioner to the command of the Femme Osage district, exempted him from the usual condition of settling and cultivating, his claim must be considered as a good, equitable claim against the Government, but not embraced by the provisions of the act of Congress of 1805. <The committee are not satisfied that the appointment to the command of the district does, of itself, exempt the petitioner from the condition of settling and cultivating; but it is known that the Spanish officers frequently received exemptions from this condition, as a matter of favor or right; and, as the petitioner was induced to omit this settlement and cultivation, by the suggestion of the said Delassus, THAT IT WAS UNNECESSARY, his claim ought not, on that account, to be rendered invalid. It also appears to the committee that the petitioner is in his old age, and has, in early life, rendered to his country arduous and useful services; and ought not, therefore, to be deprived of this remaining resource by a rigorous execution of a provision of our statute, designed to prevent frauds on the Government. <The committee, therefore, recommend the following resolution: <RESOLVED, That Daniel Boone be confirmed in his title to one thousand arpents of land, in the Femme Osage district, granted to him by the Spanish Government.> AMERICAN STATE PAPERS. PUBLIC LANDS (Washington D.C.: Gales and Seaton, 1834) 2:872

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20734-28352
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20734-28352


1834

AMERICAN STATE PAPERS. PUBLIC LANDS (Washington D.C.: Gales and Seaton, 1834)

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Claim of Daniel Boon [sic] to 1000 arpents of land in the drainage of the Femme Osage, issued by Z. Trudeau on December 26, 1799, is confirmed by a special act of Congress, Febraury 10, 1814. AMERICAN STATE PAPERS. PUBLIC LANDS (Washington D.C.: Gales and Seaton, 1834) 3:332.

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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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