THE COLONIAL RECORDS OF NORTH CAROLINA (Raleigh: Josephus Daniels, Printer to the State, 1890) 10

1890

THE COLONIAL RECORDS OF NORTH CAROLINA (Raleigh: Josephus Daniels, Printer to the State, 1890) 10

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Col. John Williams to Proprietors of Transylvania, Boonesborough, 1/3/1776, 5: <Another circumstance is, that our ammunition grows scant. I do not think there is enough to supply this place till the last of March; supposing we should have no occasion of any to repulse an enemy. If we should, God only [knows] how long it will last. If any powder can possibly be procured, it would certainly be advisable to do it; if not, some person who can manufacture the materials we have on te way, for the purpose of making powder. Most part of those are at the block-house, or at least within two or three miles of that -- the rest in Powell's Valley. Those (if we had any person who knew how properly to manufacture them into gunpowder) it would be necessary to have at this place. We have no such person, and of course they would be of but little service here. Notwithstanding, I should have sent for them before now; but people here expect the most exorbitant wages for trivial services. Not less than a dollar a day will do for anything, which will prevent my sending till I find the necessity greater, or men to be hired cheaper.> THE COLONIAL RECORDS OF NORTH CAROLINA (Raleigh: Josephus Daniels, Printer to the State, 1890) 10:382-387.

File: PUBDOCS2.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 10:38:56 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20755-28372
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20755-28372


1890

THE COLONIAL RECORDS OF NORTH CAROLINA (Raleigh: Josephus Daniels, Printer to the State, 1890) 10

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Petition of the Inhabitants of Orange County (174 men) to Martin Howard, Chief Justice, and Maurice Moore and Richard Henderson, Associate Judges (enclosed in Gov. Tyron's letter of 10/20/1770): <That as it is a Maxim in our Laws that no Law Statute or Custom which are against Gods Law or principalls of nature can be of any validity but are all null. If therefore Laws themselves when against Reason and Justice are null and void much more the practice used by men in the Law which is contrary to the Law as well as Reason Justice and Equity ought to be condemned and surely it is against Justice Reason and Equity to exact Taxes and extort Fees that are unlawful from the poor industrious Farmers -- Yet these are but a few of a great many more evils of that nature which has been of a long time our sad case and condition and to such a degree general among so many of the men of the Law that we quite despaired of any redress being to be had that way. . . . If We cannot obtain this that we may have some security for our properties more than the bare humour of officers, we can see plainly that we shall not be able to live under such oppressions and to what extremities this must drive us you can as well judge of as we can ourselves, we having no other determination but to be redressed and that to be in a legal and lawful way -- As we are serious and in good earnest and the Cause respects the whole Body of the people it would be loss of time to enter into arguments on particular points for though there is a few men who have the gift or art of reasoning yet every man has a feeling and knows when he has justice done him as well as the most learned.> THE COLONIAL RECORDS OF NORTH CAROLINA (Raleigh: Josephus Daniels, Printer to the State, 1890) 8:231-234.

File: PUBDOCS2.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 10:40:10 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20755-28373
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20755-28373


1890

THE COLONIAL RECORDS OF NORTH CAROLINA (Raleigh: Josephus Daniels, Printer to the State, 1890) 10

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Deposition of Charles Robertson, 10/3/1777, 1: <He was at the Treaty held at Watauga. . . . That as to the Treaty Conferences being held farily and openly, the Deponent frequently took Notice that both Colo. Henderson and the Indians would always cause to be present the white men and Indian Half-Breeds who understood both Languages, as a check upon the Cheif [sic] Interpreter, lest he should mistranslate, or leave out, through Forgetfulness any Part of what either Party should speak; and faith that he believes the Treaty was held fairly and openly. . . . The deponent frequently tried to count the number of Indians, which he could not do exactly, but from his best observations, there was about one thousand in all counting big and little: and about one half of them were men. . . . On the second day of the Treaty, the Dragging Canoe went out displeased on hearing the Proposals of the said Henderson as to what Lands he wanted to purchase, because (as the said Indian said) the white people wanted too much of their Hunting Grounds. . . . That towards the close of the Treaty, when the Indians seemed like complying with Colo. Hendersons Proposals, the said Henderson told the Indians there was Land between them and his Country -- He did not love to walk upon their land. That he had more Goods, Guns and Ammunition which they had not yet seen. . . .> continued

File: PUBDOCS2.NT1



    Created: 8/14/2017 10:40:50 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20755-28374
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20755-28374














    

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