Clippings, Boone Biographical File, Kentucky Historical Society

1976

Clippings, Boone Biographical File, Kentucky Historical Society

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<He was an uncouth, irresponsible hunter, who through a freak of fate was elevated to the role of folk hero in his own lifetime. . . . [Boone was] a blunderer. . . The bloated myth of Daniel Boone has overshadowed and cast into obscurity the lives of many men of far greater importance than old Dan'l.> Late historian-author Robert Emmett McDowell of Louisville, quoted in Frankfort STATE JOURNAL 1/11/1976, clipping in Boone biographical file, Kentucky Historical Society.

File: KHS6.NT2



    Created: 8/15/2017 2:05:06 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20839-28523
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20839-28523


1976

Clippings, Boone Biographical File, Kentucky Historical Society

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J. Winston Coleman, historian of Lexington: <I think Bob McDowell hurt himself when he tried to debunk Boone. Actually nobody ever accused Boone of being a statesman, a great literary light or a book collector or anything like that. He was primarily an Indian fighter -- a good one -- a frontiersman, a surveyor and I think he did an awfully good work and stands high in my estimation. There was nothing esapecially great about him. He was just an average frontiersman and woodsman and fellow out to make what money he could out of furs and skins and to settle some land, althouh he didn't have space to bury him when he died. But he was a good scout.> Quoted in Frankfort STATE JOURNAL 1/11/1976, clipping in Boone biographical file, Kentucky Historical Society.

File: KHS6.NT2



    Created: 8/15/2017 2:05:35 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20839-28524
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20839-28524


1976

Clippings, Boone Biographical File, Kentucky Historical Society

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Thomas D. Clark: <I don't know how many Indians he killed. I don't know why we get into these things of saying he's better than others. Bland Ballard was not placed in a situation where he did have a major consequence. I'm neither a defender nor a detractor of Boone. He was in a very strategic situation at Boonesborough. I don't think that Boone had any real antagonism toward the Indians. I never saw anything to indicate that he was a race hater or that he was a militant. I think that he was highly defensive when his situation was in danger and the situations of people around him but just (for Boone) to go out and attack the Indians, I've never seen any evidence of that.> On his association with Henderson: <the mystery . . . is when did he become an agent of the Henderson speculative interests? Apparently when he was out here those two years, he had some kind of an association with land speculators. He wasn't just bird counting, he was looking for some land.> Quoted in Frankfort STATE JOURNAL 1/11/1976, clipping in Boone biographical file, Kentucky Historical Society.

File: KHS6.NT2



    Created: 8/15/2017 2:06:05 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20839-28525
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20839-28525


1976

Clippings, Boone Biographical File, Kentucky Historical Society

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Hambelton Tapp, state historian and editor of the REGISTER OF THE KENTUCKY HISTORICAL SOCIETY: <There were many times that he risked his life but he wasn't as impetuous as were some of the other pioneer leaders. There was nothing dramatic about Boone whatsoever. He was more calculating, perhaps, than Ballard, who was an extremely brave man and who performed almost super human feats which required the greatest amounts of courage and bravery. Boone didn't face a situation where slaughter was imminent unless he did something to save lives. He was rather clever. He wasn't a war-like man by nature at all. His Quaker ancestry probably showed up in him a good deal. He was a man of peace. He loved peace and he dien't like to kill. Boone was as much a figurehead, . . . as much a personfication of the westward movement as he was an actual man on the ground. In some way or another, Americans have to have a hero. They have to have somebody to personify the things that get done and Boone was an attreactive person to make a hero. He didn't object. As a matter of fact he didn't discourage Filson at all in that impossible thing he wrote about him, that thing they call an autobiography.> Quoted in Frankfort STATE JOURNAL 1/11/1976, clipping in Boone biographical file, Kentucky Historical Society.

File: KHS6.NT2



    Created: 8/15/2017 2:06:54 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20839-28526
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20839-28526


1983

Clippings, Boone Biographical File, Kentucky Historical Society

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<His findings are not definitive and a plaster cast of Daniel Boone's skull he studied was incomplete, but Dr. David Wolf, Kentucky's forensic anthropologist, has found clues that could mean a body reinterred at Frankfort Cemetery 138 years ago was not that of Daniel Boone. . . . But while Wolf found evidence that the cast of Boone's skull in the Kentucky Historical Society Museum was that of a black man, he said the casting did not reveal enough of the person's head for him to make a conclusive decision.> <Wolf, who examined the plaster cast Wednesday in the curator's office of the Kentucky Historical Society Museum, said that an examiniation of the rest of the skeletal remains buried in Frankfort would probably determine the race of the person. He said it is likely there would still be enough bones to make the analysis. Wold said the forehead of the cast doesn't slope as much as with the usual caucasian male skull. "The general shape of the brow ridges are more black than white," Wolf said, and "the occipital bone (rear of the head) is more pronounced, protruding or bun-shaped, which is a black feature." Wolf also said an indentation of the frontal bone, the post orbital construction, "tends to be more of a black feature than a white." He said that the nucchal muscles at the rear of the skull on what would have been the base of the neck were well developed, "the way a slave's would be from hard work." But he said it would be possible for a caucasian to have such muscle development as well. "He was probably a big man," said Wolf, "if it (the cast) is an accurate representation of the bone size. If so, he was a large and robust person."> <Wolf said the cast was of a man that was "of pretty good size, particularly for someone of the 19th century," but he could not guess how tall the person was without the skeleton to work with. "It was someone you wouldn't want to meet alone in an alley," he added.> <"And even though it is a poor casting, you would not expect so much pronouncement of the bone in an older person," Wolf said. "Boy this really could be the skull of a Negro, but it could be a caucasian," Wolf said.> Frankfort, STATE JOURNAL 6/24/1983, clipping in Boone biographical file, Kentucky Historical Society. [Article widely reprinted through AP, including the New York Times.

File: KHS6.NT2



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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20839-28527
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20839-28527














    

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