National Register of Historic Places, Inventory-Nomination Form, obtained from State of Missouri, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation

National Register of Historic Places, Inventory-Nomination Form, obtained from State of Missouri, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation

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Flanders Callaway House 2: The house was used as a residence, trading post, and fort. It was designed with a degree of elegance, reflecting <the refined tastes of its builders and their ability through fine craftsmanship to construct a rather formal and refined dwelling utilizing material and means at hand.> Flanders Callaway first received grants 108 and 299 totalling 680.56 acres [800 arpents?], <crossed by a stream which joined the Big Femme Osage near the eastern border of his survey,> named the Callaway Fork. Sometime before 1812 Callaway and his family moved to an area near the junction of Charrette Creek and the Missouri River, where he built of logs this early federal style house. Lewis and Clark, who passed through Charrette village, described it as <consisting of seven small houses, and as many poor families, who have fixed themselves here for the convenience of trade. They form the last establishment of whites on the Missouri.> [Quoting Elliott Coues, HISTORY OF THE EXPEDITION UNDER THE COMMAND OF LEWIS AND CLARK (1893) 1:8-9] About 1812 a number of these French inhabitents sold their property, and it may be presumed that Callaway purchased his land from them. The house was the center of the growing community. The first church services in the area were held in the house; called the Friendship Church, it was Baptist. During the War of 1812 the house was either fortified, or a separate fort was built nearby. "Callaway's Fort" was one of the blockhouses used by the local residents. DB and RBB often visited with the Callaways at the house. DB funeral held in the Callaway barn because the house was too small to accomodate the crowd. The Boone-Bryan cemetery is one mile north east of the Callaway house. Flanders died at the house in 1824, his wife died there some time later. National Register of Historic Places, Inventory-Nomination Form, obtained from State of Missouri, Department of Natural Resources, Divison of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation.

File: MDNR.NT1



    Created: 8/16/2017 9:33:48 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20950-28710
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20950-28710


National Register of Historic Places, Inventory-Nomination Form, obtained from State of Missouri, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation

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Old Stone House 1: <This coursed, rubble, limestone masonry residence was built by Nathan Boone and Daniel Boone, his father, ca. 1820. It is a 46' x 26' rectangular-plan, symmetrical, five-bay, center hall house. It has a full basement, opening at grade on the rear facade, two stories and an attic. A three-story gallery spans the rear facade adding six feet to the depth of the house. The building is oriented to face 50 [degrees] east of north. The house was restored in the late 1920s and repaired in the 1960s, following a fire. It is presently a historic house museum open to the public. The openings are regular in a symmetrical, five-bay pattern on the northeast (front) facade, but slightly irregular on the southwest facade. Windows have stone jack arch lintels with keystones, and they have non-original, 12-over-8-light, double-hung sash. The attic and basement each have four-light casement windows, one to either side of the chimneys, on the gable ends. The three dormers on the rear slope of the roof, each have a six-light casement window. At the basement level, four pairs of non-original, French doors open onto the rear porch. The main entrance has a non-original, classical-style frame.> Alterations: Extensive remodeling by Beverly Nelson, a St. Louis architect in the 1920s. Repairs after the fire in the 1960s, without records of changes, irreparibly destroying many historic elements. A rumored change in the orientation of the house from facing southwest to facing northeast, making the former rear facade the primary facade. Addition of the rear porch. Removal of an added side wing on the east. Several front porches have been built and removed. Converson of the central, front, second story door to a window. Replacement of the window frames and lights several times. Continued

File: MDNR.NT1



    Created: 8/16/2017 9:34:34 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20950-28711
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20950-28711


National Register of Historic Places, Inventory-Nomination Form, obtained from State of Missouri, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Old Stone House 2: Inspired by the federal style. Similarities in design and construction to the 1733 house of George Boone III, grandfather of DB, at Limekiln, PA. In 1837 Nathan was forced to sell his home and land to pay a debt contracted while serving as a bondsman for a county offical who absconded with public funds. During the "long period" during which the house was constructed, the family lived in a log cabin on the site. National Register of Historic Places, Inventory-Nomination Form, obtained from State of Missouri, Department of Natural Resources, Divison of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation.

File: MDNR.NT1



    Created: 8/16/2017 9:35:06 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20950-28712
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20950-28712


National Register of Historic Places, Inventory-Nomination Form, obtained from State of Missouri, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation

Keywords
None.
People
None.
He aided in the negotiation of the Osage Treaty of 1808, and during the War of 1812 served in the militia on the Missouri and Illinois frontiers, rising to the rank of major. In 1820 he was a member of the convention which wrote the first MO constitution. Was employed as a federal surveyor, worked extensively in the border area of Iowa and Missouri. An Iowa county is named for him. In 1832 he joined the army, serving as Captain of the "Mounted Rangers" in the Black Hawk War. For the next 20 yearrs he was in the service. Captain in the First Dragoons, the first regular regiment of cavalry organized in the US Army, and rose to the rank of Lt. Colonel in the Second Dragoons prior to his retirement in 1853. His service took him across the plains, on expeditions to lay out military roads and posts, on marches to impress the Indians, and to duty in most of the army posts of the western frontier. He served with Dodge and Kearney, Taylor and Arbuckle, patrolled the border, and guarded trains on the Sante Fe Trail. He was involved in the efforts to reconcile the Old Settlers among the Cherokee with the Eastern Cherokee in Oklahoma and led several efforts to negotiate treaties with the Comanche, Kiowa, and other plains tribes. He was most certainly a prominent figure in the early affairs of Iowa and Oklahoma. National Register of Historic Places, Inventory-Nomination Form, obtained from State of Missouri, Department of Natural Resources, Divison of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation.

File: MDNR.NT1



    Created: 8/16/2017 9:35:43 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20950-28713
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20950-28713


National Register of Historic Places, Inventory-Nomination Form, obtained from State of Missouri, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Flanders Callaway House 1: One mile south of Marthasville, on State Highway 94 and 100 yards south; survey No. 748, Township 45N, Range 1W. <The Flanders Callaway house is a two story walnut hewn-log frontier house, typical of early Federal style log constructions found in Kentucky and Tennessee. The house faces south toward the Missouri River, is symmetrical in plan, and five bays wide. The walls are sheathed with walnut clapboarding painted white. . . . Basic proportions of the house are long and low in comparison with later versions of the Federal style which lbecame progressively more vertical. This house is notable for its early date of construction, ca. 1812, the end result surpassing what might be expected considering that all materials were undoubtedly assembled from the immediate locale and worked to final form and finish at the site. The design is regularly composed in a symmetrical floor plan having four rooms in the original main block of the house, one room upstairs and one downstairs on either side of the central hall and "U" plan stairway. The regularity of the interior plan is reflected on the exterior in the symmetrical five bay facade. The central front doorway on the facade (south wall) is framed by a row of lights conforming to the typical vocabulary of the Federal style. End chimneys at east and west ends of ridge roof over main block of house, located symmetrically in relation to the facade, are contained within the fabric of the house. Windows are double hung sash throughout, with nine over six light sash on the first floor of the facade (south wall), and six over six light sash used elsewhere on the building, including the second floor of the facade.> Alterations: one story ell in the rear; replacement door with a large glass pane; one story porch. The house, on the flood plain of the river, has suffered flood damage throughout its history. The bottom 2 to 4 feet of the log walls bulge outward as a result of deterioration caused by repeated inundation. Settling has caused the ell to separate from the main block. Continued

File: MDNR.NT1



    Created: 8/16/2017 9:36:51 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20950-28714
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20950-28714


1936

National Register of Historic Places, Inventory-Nomination Form, obtained from State of Missouri, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Flanders Callaway House: A. G. Boone, DB grandson, stated that Boone <had given up his fort at La Charette (which he built for the protection of everybody during Indian hostilities) to Mr. Flanders Calloway.> Was this house built by DB? MHR 30 (1936):213

File: MDNR.NT1



    Created: 8/16/2017 9:39:02 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20950-28715
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-20950-28715














    

SourceNotes
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