Howard Lamar, ed., Reader's Encyclopedia of the American West

Howard Lamar, ed., Reader's Encyclopedia of the American West

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From 1773 to 1785 a constant stream of settlement from PA, MD, VA, eastern TN, and NC, either by way of the Ohio or the Wilderness Road. First permanent settlement begun in 6/1774 at Harrod's Town, but disrupted by Dunmore's War. Harrod and party back in spring of 1775, along with the company led by DB, who began construction of Boonesboro. Soon stations and settlements all over the central region. TDClark in LAMAR.

File: LMR.NT2



    Created: 9/27/2017 12:41:13 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-21227-28957
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-21227-28957


Howard Lamar, ed., Reader's Encyclopedia of the American West

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1776-82 was a period of constant raiding by Indians and British from north of the Ohio. Expeditions from Kentucky into the Ohio country spearheaded by George Rogers Clark. Major attacks on the settlements ceased with the 8/1782 Battle of the Blue Licks, yet minor raids continued, especially along the Ohio, well into the 1790s. Yet settlement continued and was consistent. By 1781 the roads from Cumberland Gap and down the Ohio were filled with incoming settlers, for the most party farmers who sought small landholdings and opportunities to escape debt and the oppressions caused by the Revolution. Many were veterans with VA land warrants entitling them to land claims under the VA land law of 1779. TCClark in LAMAR.
File: LMR.NT2



    Created: 9/27/2017 12:42:06 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-21227-28958
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-21227-28958


Howard Lamar, ed., Reader's Encyclopedia of the American West

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By 1784 the population (ca. 12,000) had expanded to the point were settlers began to complain to VA abouts its official shortcomings, and most of all about the confusions in land claims. Hundreds of petitions were sent to Williamsburg. 1784 a meeting called in Danville for the purpose of discussing the greatest problem of all, the Indian menace. This meeting at Danville in 1784 was the first of ten conventions that eventually led to the formation of the independent Commonwealth of Kentucky. The process of separation involved many issues, among them protection of land titles, the sharing of VA debts, and the entry of KY into the Confederation. After 1787 a most important issue was the opening of the Ohio and Mississippi to free use by KY farmers and boatmen. TDClark in LAMAR
File: LMR.NT2



    Created: 9/27/2017 12:42:36 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-21227-28959
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-21227-28959


Howard Lamar, ed., Reader's Encyclopedia of the American West

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Stations were usually strong log houses or small forts that were used as places of refuge from Indian attacks. Some grew into towns (Louisville, Lexington, Danville, Harrodsburg) others disappeared. Families and property were left at the station while the men located sites for homesteads or new stations. TDClark in LAMAR
File: LMR.NT2



    Created: 9/27/2017 12:43:01 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-21227-28960
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-21227-28960


Howard Lamar, ed., Reader's Encyclopedia of the American West

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The Kentucky rifle: of PA origin. The term refers to the use of this weapon by the KY pioneers during the Revolution, who brought it to fame and prominence. The first of these long-barreled muzzle-loading types was produced in 1728, and by 1800 there were almost as many manufacturers as there were rifles. Was distinguished from European models by being lighter and more slender, bored to a smaller caliber, with better balance. The best were produced around Lancaster, Pennsylvania. This was the first truly American firearm, produced to meet the requirements of the frontier. There were four basic types depending upon length of barrels and the type of percussion or fuse. Most primitive were the flintlocks that fired into a priming pan and transmitted fire through a powder hole to the chamber of the rifle. The later types used a percussion cap fitted over a tube or fuse plug. Boring and rifling was done on a gun lathe in which the bore and "rifles" in the barrel were cut according to the size and shape of the tool used. The heavy octagonal barrel was mounted ina long sheath of curly maple or burled walnut, and owners decorated them according to their tastes. Also necessary was a large powder horn, a small priming horn, a patch pocket, flints, channel picks, and a stout but slender ramrod. The Kentucky rifle became the symbol of pioneering. It was gradually superseded, first by the shorter, heavier bore "mountain rifle," that was easier to handle when in the saddle or on rough trails; developed at about the same time that percussion began to supplant flintlock, in the 1820s. The "plains rifle," classically the Hawken rifles of St. Louis, were originally flintlocks but gradually became percussion; these were dominant by the 1830s.
File: LMR.NT2



    Created: 9/27/2017 12:43:37 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-21227-28961
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-21227-28961














    

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