Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series A, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

1988

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series A, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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William Dodd Brown, "A Visit to Boonesborough in 1779: The Recollections of Pioneer George M. Bedinger," KHS REGISTER 86 (1988):315-329. This is copied verbatim from Draper's interview with Bedinger in DM 1A.

File: 1A1.DR2



    Created: 6/29/2017 6:38:31 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22298-24546
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22298-24546


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series A, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Several examples of fool-hardiness: Coming to Boonesborough in 1779: <When within 6 miles of Boonesborough, they were about camping [when] some one proposed that they should for safety go a little off the trace and sleep without fires. [Upon hearing this] Col. William Morgan, who had seen some service as well under Braddock as in the war then existing, dryly remarked that they need not troublle themselves so much for they wouldn't die until their time came. The others, not wishing to be thought cowardly, did not call the colonel's philosophy in question. . . . A large, bright fire was soon struck up, and having partaken of their simple repast, they nestled down in their blankets before the cheerful blaze. The next morning, they arose and had proceeded but a few rods when to their astonishment they discovered where an Indian party, seeing the large fire in the night and the party and horses so boldly encamped on the trail, had evidently mistaken extreme carelessness for stratagem and gladly shunned the distrustful spot.> Another: A hunting party from Boonesborough, including two brothers, Thomas and Benoni Swearingen. Some young buffalo crossed their route, and some proposed to shoot one for breakfast; in general hunting parties made it a practice only to shoot at night. Tom <reproached them for their BOYISH conduct; that their scalps would surely be the forfeit of their rashness as Indians were around and that they ought to exhibit more self denial and fortitude and act like men. "Well, Brother Tom," saidBenoni Swearingen, "I'll tell you what it is. We'll see who theBOYS are and who evinces the most fortitude for YOU shall be the first to say when we shall slay and eat."> Another: In July1779 three men from Virginia were visiting Boonesborough. They went with a young Callaway to the Elkhorn hunting. Returning, Callaway, sensing Indians, warned them to leave the path for safety. <They scoffed at the ida. They didn't fear Indians and boasted of their bravery.> Callaway left them, and they were later attacked. One escaped and two were wounded and captured. Interview with George M. Bedinger 1A12-13, 1A17-18, and 1A31; copied in William Dodd Brown, "A Visit to Boonesborough in 1779: The Recollections of Pioneer George M. Bedinger," KHS REGISTER 86(1988):317, 321, 327.
File: 1A1.DR2



    Created: 9/7/2017 1:50:50 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22298-28788
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22298-28788


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series A, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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This from 1779: <Boonesborough could boast of not better defender or more successful hunter than[blank] White. Yet he had his failing: his lack of sufficient prudence and his careless and unnecessary exposure of himself to danger was deemed more thoughtless than fool-hardy. John Cradlebaugh, a noble fellow, as cautious as he was brave, seeingWhite and another of the garrison wending their way of a summer afternoon to bathe in the river, concluded he would see if he could not, by a little stratagem, put a stop to this heedless imprudence. Soliciting the aid of a fellow hunter, with their guns and blankets and a small quantity of paint, [they] made their way to a ford up the river, crossed, bedaubed their faces with paint, and adjusted their blankets in good Indian style. [They then] stole upon their unsuspecting comrades bathing in the stream near the north shore. A little rustling around among the bushes attracted the attention of White and his companion who looked with stupid amazement upon the supposed Indians. Whenever Cradlebaugh would level his rlfle, White with the quickness of a wild duck would make a great spashing in the water, and swim toward the southern shore. White, when he could stand it no longer, would rise to the surface to take breath and Cradlebaugh's threatening rifle would again cause him to seek safety beneath the river's surface. In this way White finally reached the southern shore; and his comrade, filled with the greatest consternation, swam the stream, but so weak was he from fear that in ascending the bank he fell backwards and had they been actual Indians neither White nor his fellow would have escaped. The garrison was greatly alarmed and a party went out in pursuit. Cradlebaugh and his friend washed the pain from their faces and secretly returned to the fort in time to join in search of the Indians. For a long time Cradlebaugh and his comrade kept their secret. White, who was one of the best hunters in the fort and often brought in more than his share of meat, finally lost his life while on a hunting tour north ofKentucky River.> Interview with George M. Bedinger 1A16-17, copied in William Dodd Brown, "A Visit to Boonesborough in 1779: The Recollections of Pioneer George M. Bedinger," KHS REGISTER 86(1988):325-26.
File: 1A1.DR2



    Created: 9/7/2017 1:52:04 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22298-28789
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22298-28789


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series A, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Bedinger <brought out fully a quart of apple seeds [when he came in 1779]; gave them to old Monk, aNegro of Estill's, to raise trees upon shares. He made a fine nursery, and though Bedinger got none, they were a great benefit to the country.> Interview with George M. Bedinger 1A19, copied in William Dodd Brown, "A Visit to Boonesborough in 1779: TheRecollections of Pioneer George M. Bedinger," KHS REGISTER 86(1988):324. Brown adds this note on Monk: He came with JamesEstill in 1775; his skill at making gunpowder proved vital to the defense of Boonesborough. In 1782 he was living at Estill's Station. He, Jennie Gass, and another slave named Dick were working outside the fort in March when the Indians attacked. Dick reached the fort safely, but Jennie was killed and Monk captured. Quizzed about the size of the garrison, Monk so exaggerated its strength that the Indians decided to withdraw. They were pursued by Estill and 25 men who caught up with them about 25 miles distant. During the battle, Monk escaped and joined Estill's party; was put in charge of guarding the horses. After the battle, he carried badly wounded James Berry back to the fort. Over the years he had three wives and many children. His son Jerry was the first black child born at Boonesborough. He was a longtime resident of Madison County, KY, and died thereabout 1835. Ibid, 324n.
File: 1A1.DR2



    Created: 9/7/2017 2:16:56 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22298-28790
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22298-28790


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series A, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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1779: <A drove of hogs was in the woods -- theoriginals brought out by Boone -- now so wild that even thewolves dared not attack them. Now and then one was killed by thehunters and brought in, placed in commissary's hands [Bedingerhad been appointed to that post], salted and placed in the old"ware-house" and kept for use when the supplies of fresh meatshould fail.> Interview with George M. Bedinger 1A19, copied in William Dodd Brown, "A Visit to Boonesborough in 1779: The Recollections of Pioneer George M. Bedinger," KHS REGISTER 86(1988):324.
File: 1A1.DR2



    Created: 9/7/2017 2:17:25 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22298-28791
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22298-28791


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series A, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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This from circa 1778: <Boonesborough had been in constant apprehension from Indians loitering around the fort. They were reduced to great strait -- the men few nor could they risk any great hazard as the life of each was too precious and their families too dear. Stratagem had to supply the place of greater strength. Each night a horse was placed a proper distance from the fort with one [of] his hind feet securely fastened to the root of a sapling and three good marskmen in ambush near by. One night, a small party of Indians seeing the horse made up towards him, but half suspecting the rat in the meal tub, they cleared themselves and thus narrowly escaped. These Indians remarked to their fellows that the LongKnives must be fools to think of catching them like so many beaver. A white prisoner, who heard the remark, soon after escaped and reached Boonesborough where he related the circumstance.> Interview with George M. Bedinger 1A13, copied in William Dodd Brown, "A Visit to Boonesborough in 1779: The Recollections of Pioneer George M. Bedinger," KHS REGISTER 86(1988):316-17.
File: 1A1.DR2



    Created: 9/7/2017 2:25:19 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22298-28792
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22298-28792














    

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