Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

1853

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Testimonial <The facts and papers I have furnished to Mr. Lyman C. Draper, now of Madison, Wisconsin, together with many others of an authentic character obtained by him from other aged members of the family, & from surviving companions of my father, the late Col. Daniel Boone, should give to his work on my father the merit it justly deserves, of being the only reliable one extant. From my own personal knowledge of Mr. Draper, and the unusual pains I know he has taken to acquaint himself of the real facts of my father's life, his motives, habits & characteristics, sifting out and discarding not a few erroneous and apochryphal stories, I hope his work, prepared with so much care and faithfulness, and which alone will hand down to posterity any thing like a correct view of my father's public and private career, will meet with a kind reception by all who regard the truth and justice of history generally, and the toils and privations especially of those who, under God, were humbly instrumental in effecting the early settlement of Kentucky and the West. This is alike due to the memory and services of my worthy father, and the untiring zeal and efforts of Mr. Draper for the past fifteen years in the collection of facts, to record his name and actions, in their true light and just prop[ortions?] on the pages of our border history. Wishing for this work that success which I honestly feel that it merits [and] eminently deserve[s], I remain, very respectfully, Nathan Boone. Green County, Mo., Sept. 1853.> 1B14

File: 1B1.DR2



    Created: 5/31/2017 11:20:33 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-23917
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-23917


1893

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Reuben G. Thwaites note (8/1893) at beginning of Boone mss: <This incomplete MS. was apparently not touched after about 1855, at the time Dr. Draper was negotiating with B. J. Lossing for the latter's collaboration.> 1B1

File: 1B1.DR2



    Created: 5/31/2017 4:26:10 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-23916
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-23916


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Testimonials signed by the following persons: Edward Coles and John Reynolds (both former governors of Illinois and historians); John M. Peck; Samuel and Edward Boone (sons of George Boone, DB's brother); John Scholl (grandson of Edward Boone); Joseph Scholl (grandson of DB); Susan Howell; Higgason Grubbs Boone (grand-nephew of DB); Joseph and William T. Bryan (sons of Daniel Bryan, grandsons of William Bryan of Bryan's Station, and grand nephews of DB); Morgan Bryan (husband of Elizabeth Bryan); Elizabeth Callaway Bryan and Frances Callaway Lamme (daughters of Flanders and Jemima Boone Callaway); John Stewart [Stuart] Pennington (son of Hannah Boone Stuart, wife of John Stuart, sister of DB); Nathan and Olive Boone; Benjamin H. Boone (son of Nathan and Olive Boone); Nathan Goe (grandson of DB); Sarah Boone Hunter (daughter of Edward Boone, DB's brother); L. D. Boone, M.D. (grand nephew of DB); Daniel Pennington (son of Hannah Boone Stuart Pennington, sister of DB, by her second husband); Albert G. and Van Daniel Boone (sons of Jesse B. Boone, DB's son); Daniel, Alonzo H., and Edward Boone (sons of Daniel Morgan Boone); Amazon, Linville, Upton, Samuel, and Seth M. Hays (sons of Boone Hays, grandson of DB); James Boone (oldest son of Nathan and Olive Boone); Edward Boone Scholl (grandson of Edward Boone, DB's brother); Joshua Pennington Sr. (son of Hannah Boone Stuart Pennington, by her second husband); Wilford H. Yorr, Daniel H. and Hiram C. Boone (grandsons of Squire Boone, DB's brother); Susan Boone Codkrill (grandneice of DB); Rebecca Boone Grant Lamon (neice of DB); Isaac Vanbibber (great-grandson of DB); Isaiah Boon [sic] (son of Squire Boone, DB's brother); Lafayette and Granvill Boon [sic] (sons of Isaiah Boon [sic]); Edward Boone Scholl (grandson of Edward Boone, DB's brother); Enoch Boone; Levine S. Newman; L. W. Boggs; Panthea G. Boggs; James Davidson; James E. Welch. 1B passim

File: 1B1.DR2



    Created: 6/14/2017 7:12:02 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24240
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Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Large party of Shawnees, led by "Captain Will." "An Indian in the ascendant, is always proud and imperious; and yet, in his simple nature, he can oftentimes be measurably controlled in his actions, even by his own prisoner whom fortune has thrown in his way, if such prisoner only possess the requisite tact, shrewdness and fearless independence -- and these Boone possessed in an eminent degree. On this occasion he readily consented to comply with all the whims and demands of his captors. But while he and Stuart were piloting them to the nearest capm, Boones. thoughts were busily employed upon the best course of procedure in these trying circumstnces." (2B186)

File: 2B4.DR1



    Created: 6/15/2017 11:21:14 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24253
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Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Captain Will to Boone: "Now, brothers, go home and stay there. Don't come here any more, for this is the Indians' hunting ground, and all the animals, skins and furs are ours; and if you are so foolish as to venture here again, you may be sure the wasps and yellow-jackets will sting you severely." (2B188)

File: 2B4.DR1



    Created: 6/15/2017 11:23:21 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-22299-24254
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Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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After being released, then stealing back their horses, then being again captured by Captain Will, Boone was made to wear a horse's bell and caper around jingling it, while the laughing and whooping Indians chided him in broken English: "Steal horse, eh?" Seemed to be satisfied with this form of humiliation. Seven days later (about 11/4/70) DB and Stuart escaped. Filson has them escaping in the night, but this is not the way Boone related the story to his children -- in which they escape in the afternoon into a canebreak. (2B191-94, citing narrative of Daniel Bryan and conversations with Nathan Boone)

File: 2B4.DR1



    Created: 6/15/2017 11:25:51 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-22299-24255
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Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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DB and Stuart, after escaping, returned to Station Camp, found it abandoned, continued on back, and found their party some 35 miles distant. With the party, says Draper, was SQUIREBJR, returned with supplies along with Alexander Neely. (2B194)

File: 2B4.DR1



    Created: 6/15/2017 11:27:28 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24256
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Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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"That Mrs. Boone sent any complaining message [with Squire] about her husband's prlonged absence, and urging his speedy return, we know, from her amiable character, could not have been true; but that she may have mildly expressed a hope soon to see him at home again, is very probable. But if she did, it made only a slight impression on the wanderer's mind, for while he really loved his wife and children, he did not yet care to go back to the plow so long as he could live comfortably by his rifle in the wilderness. And more than this, he had incurred no small exprnse, and sustained no inconsiderable losses, in the inception and prosecution of this enterprise; and now that Squire Boone had so opportunely arrived, with more horses, traps, and a fresh supply of ammunition, he could not help thinking that it was his duty to remain, and procure a load of valuable furs to pack home, with which to wipe off all indebtedness against him." (2B195-96)

File: 2B4.DR1



    Created: 6/15/2017 11:28:48 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24257
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Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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The party: Holden and Cooley were neighbors of DB on the Yadkin, never returned to KY after their trip home, died there. Mooney, also from the Yadkin, was killed at the Battle of Point Pleasant. Findley headed back to Pennsylvania and was never heard of again by the Boones. But this unidentified newspaper clipping from the Upcott Collection of clippings in the NY Historical Society, dated 1/3/72: <Several Senecas have lately been killed by our people, and the Indians, in revenge, have murdered a whole family on Buffaloe Creek, and four farmers on Youghiogamy; and they have likewise killed Robert Parsons, the trader, and robbed John Findlay of above five hundred pounds worth of goods.> It is thus likely that Finley had returned to PA and reengaged in Indian trading. According to Draper: <He probably did not long survive this last robbery, which occured evidently towards the close of 1771; but whether this early and meritorious adventurer sickened and died alone, somewhere in the fertile Valley of the Ohio, or fell victim to savage cruelty, remains a mystery, and must unquestionably remain so forever.> (2B196)

File: 2B4.DR1



    Created: 6/15/2017 11:29:54 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-22299-24258
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Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Testimonial Numerous members of the Boone family signed the following statement: <In view of the facts & documents furnished by us to Mr/ Lyman C. Draper, & those he has, with unwearied zeal & faithfulness, collected, during the past sixteen years, from other authentic sources, we unhesitatingly express our belief that his LIFE OF COL. DANL. BOONE is the only one extant, which we, his descendants and connections, regard as complete & reliable; & as cush, take pleasure in commending it to public favor & confidence.>

File: 2B1.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 8:13:19 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24936
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24936


1853-09

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Testimonial <The facts and papers I have furnished to Mr Lyman C. Draper, now of Madison, Wisconsin, together with many others of an authentic character obtained by him from other aged members of the family, & from surviving companions of my father, the late Col. Daniel Boone, should give to hiss work on my father the merit it justly deserves, of being the only reliable one extant. From my own personal knowledge of Mr. Draper, and the unusual pains I know he has taken to acquaint himself of the real facts of my father's life, his moltives, habits, & characteristics, sifting out and discarding not a few erroneous and apochryphal [sic] stories, I hope his work, prepared with so much care and faithfulness, and which alone will hand down to posterity any thing like a correct view off my father's public and private career, will meet with a kind reception by all who regard the truth and justice of history generally, and the toils and privations especially of those who, under God, were humbly instrumental in effecting the early settlement of Kentucky and the West. This is alike due to the memory and services of my worthy father, and the untiring zeal and efforts of Mr. Draper for the past fifteen years in the collection of facts, to record his name and actions in their turu light on the pages of our border history. Wishing for this work that success which I honestly feel that it merits eminently deserve, I remain, very respectfully, [signed] Nathan Boone. Green County, MO, Sept, 1853.> 1B14-15

File: 2B1.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 8:14:29 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24937
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24937


1812

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Quotes DB as saying about KY: <Those fertile plains were unequalled on our earth, and laid the fairest claim to the description of the garden of God." (Quoting from Boone's Ms Memorial to the Legislature of KY, 1812). 2B3

File: 2B1.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 8:16:25 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24938
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Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<Daniel Boone was no ordinary man; and this volume will aim to delineate, fully and faithfully, the origin and career of that celebrated pioneer of Kentucky.> 2B3

File: 2B1.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 8:17:15 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24939
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Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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When he died in 1744 he left eight children, fifty-two grandchildren, and ten great grandchildren. 2B14

File: 2B1.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 8:20:01 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24940
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Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Squire Boone SR and wife Mary Bryan purchased from Ralph Asheton a grant for 250 acres of land, situated in Oley, on Owatin Creek, about a mile above its confluence with the Monackasy, and about three and a half miles from the junction of the later with the Schuylkill. A level tract of red shale land, well adapted to grazing, located about eight miles southeast of the present city of Reading, and a mile and a half from Exeter meeting house. Moved there with wife and four children in early 1731, settling in the immediate neighborhood of his parents, the Webbs, and the Stovers. <We may pretty safely conclude that the period of between ten and eleven years that he resided in Gwynedd after his marriage, was devoted in part to weaving, and in part to farming -- most likely on tenanted land. By industry and economy a sufficiency of means had been gradually accumulated to puchase a home in Oley, where lands were yet held at moderate prices.> 2B18

File: 2B1.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 8:21:45 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24941
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Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Food: bread, milk, and pie for breakfast; pork or bacon, wheat-flour pudding or dumplings with butter and molasses for dinner; mush or hominy with milk, butter and honey for supper. Choclate occasionally procured, sweetened with maple sugar; venison and wild turky in season. 2B19

File: 2B1.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 8:24:11 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-22299-24942
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Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Smallpox story. <While Daniel was still a very small boy, the small-pox was brought into the neighborhood. To prevent the exposure of her children to this much-dreaded and loathsome disease, Mrs. Boone kept them pretty closely confined at home. This severe restraint becoming intolerably irksome to little Daniel, and his next older sister Elizabeth, they talked the matter over in some quiet corner, and arrived at the conclusion that their only hope of speedy relief was, to take the disease; and once over it, they would again be free to go where, and associate with whom, they pleased. So after retiring to bed of an evening, they slyly got up and stole off undiscovered to a neighbor's, where they laid down beside a person having the offensive disorder; and, returning home with a sort of secret triumph, they quietly crept into their beds as though nothing had happened. Discovering in due time the premonitory symptoms, and suspecting full well to what they would lead, the good Mrs. Boone looking her little son full in the face, said calmly, "Now Daniel, I want thee to tell thy mother the whole truth." This he did, with child-like simplicity, and without the least reserve. "Thee naughty little gorrel," said his mother chidingly, "why did thee not tell me before, so that I could have had thee better prepared?" But Daniel, as did the other children, got through the disease very easily, and secured the freedom for which, even in tender years, he so much longed, and which he so dearly enjoyed.> Reminiscence of Nathan Boone. 2B21-22

File: 2B1.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 8:26:25 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24943
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Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<The sight of Indians must have been among his earliest recollections. They often visited the Oley and Exeter settlements, and were kindly entertained by these hospitable Quaker people. It is recorded in the Provincial Records of Pennsylvania, that in the summer of 1736 the famous old Delaware chief Sassanoon or Allummoppees, with several other chiefs, young men, women and children, numbering twenty-five altogether, arrived at George Boone's on their way to Philadelphia, and there learned [of] the recent death of Patrick Gordon, the Lieutenant Governor of the province. The Moravian historian Loskiel relatesthat, in Feb. 1742, the celebrated Count Zinzendorf appointed a synod at Oley, where he met many of his Moravian brethren. Three Indian converts assembled with them. Their place of meeting was a barn, there then being no churcdh in Oley.> These three were baptised, and went on to preach <a whole night to a party of Delaware Indians, who were in the neighborhood, and by the providence of God were just at that time led to return to Oley.> Reminiscence of Nathan Boone. 2B22-23

File: 2B1.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 8:27:53 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-22299-24944
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Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<These and similar bands of red men visiting the neighborhood, must have afforded the inquisitive mind of young Boone curious and interesting subjects of study and contemplation, and thus have laid the foundation of that thorough knowledge of the Indian character, which he so often, in after life, brought into requisition alike for his own and the public weal.> Reminiscence of Nathan Boone 2B24

File: 2B1.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 8:31:21 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24945
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Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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During the grazing season DB's father sent his stock several miles distant to the range. DB's mother always went along to <give her personal attention to the dairy,> while the father remained behind to tend his looms. DB regularly went along. <From the age of ten to sixteen years, young Boone was constantly employed, from spring till late in the fall, watching the herd while daily roaming through the woods, bringing them up at the close of the day for milking, and for nightly herding in the cow-pens.> Reminiscence of Nathan Boone 2B25

File: 2B1.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 8:33:13 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-22299-24946
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Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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His staff, made of a small sapling grubbed up by the roots, shaved down to leav a rooty knob at the end. He called this his "herdsman's club." Became very skilled at using this club for killing small game and birds. <Experience and observation were his only teachers, and they found in young Noone a scholar apt and ardent. There was, withal, a charm and quietness about this nomadic life, reminding one of the patriarchal ages and implanting inDaniel Boone's youthful mind a fervid love of nature in all its varied phases.> Reminiscence of Nathan Boone 2B25

File: 2B1.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 8:49:17 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-22299-24947
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Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<Reared, as he was, under the peaceful influence of the Quaker faith, he would nevertheless fealessly maintain his rights, as he understood them. On one occasion, a mischievous youth of the neighborhood, by some unmitigated misrepresentation, managed to embroil young Boone and an intimate friend of about the same age, in a fierce combat at fisticuffs, in which boone had one of his front teeth so loosened that it never again became firm in the socket; and, a year or two before his death, it was pulled out by one of his daughters, with her thumb and finger. Subsequently learning their mistake, the young pugilists renewed their friendship, caught the cowardly meddler, and gave him such a pommeling as his baseness deserved.> Reminiscence of Nathan Boone. 2B27

File: 2B1.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 8:50:31 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-22299-24948
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Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<Daniel Boone never went to school a day in his life, as he himself often related to his children. When he was about fourteen years of age, his brother Samuel, nearly seven years his senior, married a very amiable and intelligent young lady named Sarah Day, who taught her young brother-in-law Daniel to read and spell a little, and in a rude manner, to form letters. He could at first do little more than write his own name in an uncouth and mechanical way. To these humble beginnings, he added something as he grew up, by his own practical application. His acquirements were limited to reading, writing, and the rudiments of arithmetic. He could read understandingly, and write intelligently. His compositions bear the marks of strong common sense, yet, as might be expected, exhibiting defects in orthography, grammar, and style, by no means infrequent.> Reminiscence of Nathan Boone. 2B27

File: 2B1.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 8:51:50 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-22299-24949
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Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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First rifle-gun purchased for him by father when he was 13. <His love for the chase now became a passion with him.> Reminiscence of Nathan Boone. 2B26

File: 2B1.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 8:55:21 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-22299-24950
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Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<This early occupation of herdsman -- spending so many of his youthful days in the range and wilderness, where game was plenty and attractive, was what -- Boone used himself to relate -- gave him such an enthusiastic fondness for the wildwoods and hunter's life.> Reminiscence of Nathan Boone. 2B26

File: 2B1.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 8:56:47 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
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    ID: 27-40-22299-24951
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Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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DB laying down for a rest; two girls, for a joke, dashed a pail of fish guts on his face. Jumping up and rubbing the filth from his eyes, he gave them both a sound beating, sending them home with swollen faces and bloody noses. Their mother complaining to his mother, she replied: "If thee has not brought up thy daughters to better behavior, it is high time they were taught good manners. And if Daniel has given them a lesson, I hope, for my part, that it will, in the end, do them no harm; and I have only to add, that I bid thee good day." Draper calls this "rough joking," and adds (in a note) that annually at the Schuylkill shad runs there were complaints of "tulmultous meetings, riotous behavior, quarrels, contentions, and even outrages amongst the young people and others who assemble as to a merry-making or a publick diversion, at the time of fishing by racks" (quoting from the COLONIAL RECORDS OF PA, vol 4) Eventually this "rough joking" got so out of hand, it led to the suppression of such occasions. Reminiscence of Isaiah Boone, son of Squire Boone Jr. 2B28

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    Created: 7/4/2017 8:58:14 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24952
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24952


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Henry Miller, several years DB's senior, was his "crony." He lived with the family, working as an apprentice in DB's father's shop, learning the craft of smithing, which Squire Sr. also practiced (in addition to weaving). These two were great pranksters. <If some fault-finding or meddlesome neighbor affronted either, one of his wagon-wheels would very likely be seen the next morning gracing the roof off his barn, or dangling high in some neighboring tree-top.> Tells the story of overloading George Wilcoxen's gun (see in Bakeless). Also of taking the horse at night: <A distant frolic was on hand. Boone knew full well it would be a waste of time to ask permission of his staid old Quaker parents to attend; so he and Miller, like minute-men as they were, hastily adjusted their linsey-woolsey hunting-shirts, selected Squire Boone's best nag, mounted him double, and started off after night unseen. Returning at a late hour, and passing up Squire Boone's land, the frolicksome youths attempted to make their horse leap over an old cow reposing quietly in the path; but the cow suddenly springing up alarmed, threw the horse, who unfortunately broke his neck in the fall. Taking the bridle and saddle, they made off home; and putting them in their proper places, crept slyly into bed, and kept their own secret. The old man and family wondered again & again how the poor horse could possibly have managed to break his own neck.> Reminiscence of Isaiah Boone, son of Squire Jr. 2B29

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    Created: 7/4/2017 8:59:15 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24953
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24953


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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In a note Draper cites Nathan Boone and his wife as the source for much of the childhood material, related to them, he says, by DB himself "in various familiar conversations when a member of their family" which would place it during the last five years of his life. 2B29

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    Created: 7/4/2017 9:00:09 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24954
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24954


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Testimonial. <From our personal acquaintance with Col. Daniel Boone, and our general familiarity with the early history of Kentucky and the West, we cannot but highly appreciate the long and patient efforts of Mr. Lyman C. Draper in collecting materials, from original and reliable sources, for a full and faithful Life of that far-famed Kentucky pioneer, and do not hesitate to commend the work to the favorable consideration of all who cherish a love for the deeds of noble daring by which the now mighty West was preserved from the grasp of the Briton and the Savage.>

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    Created: 7/4/2017 9:07:54 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24955
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24955


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<In the Forks of North and South Yadkin,clear and rapid mountain streams, was a lovely and fertile region. Here, upon Dutchman's creek, a tributary of North Yadkin, and at a place called the Buffalo Lick, which was probably at the confluence of Buffalo creek with Dutchman's, in a rich and undulating country Squire Boone [sr] made choice of a spot for his new home. Between the Yadkin and Catawba large prairies spread out into a broad expanse, with their luxuriant growth of grass, where have since spring up many a mighty forest. These native meadows, with the tall and vigorous canebrakes overspreading the bottoms and skirting the streams, furnished food and shelter for wild game, and sustenance the whole year for the stock of the new settlers. Game was everywhere plentiful, and the Yadkin afforded an ample supply of shad and other delicious kinds of fish, in their season. The country was sufficiently elevated above the flat region, which stretches for sixty miles back from the sea-coast, to render it, with its pure water and serene air, one of the healthiest portions of North America. The oppressive heat of summer was genially tempered by the extensive mountain 5range on the west, and the nights were delightfully cool and refreshing. Autumn, with its mellow hue, and ripened wild fruits, presented a rich variety of vegetation, and the misletoe, that beautiful twining evergreen, was common in all that frontier region. Such was the Yadkin Valley practically the poor man's home -- a land of plenty and happiness.> 2B37-38

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    Created: 7/4/2017 9:08:48 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24956
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24956


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<When all that fair region lay open to the choice of the new settlers, the comparative plenty of cane generally decided the preference of one spot over another. With this paramount consideration in view, Squire Boone's location was made at Buffalo Lick. The soil yielded so generous a return for the little labor bestowed on it, that the necessaries of life were secured with scarcely any effort. Daniel Boone worked occasionally during the cropping season for his father, but he had no heart to perform the drudgery of farming. Let but a shower come up to prevent, for a while, out-door labor, he would take his rifle and glide into the nearest forest; and though the rain should cease in an hour, the excitement of the chase would beguile him on, till reminded by the approach of night to retrace his wandering footsteps.> 2B38-39

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    Created: 7/4/2017 9:10:06 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24957
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24957


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<At this period, there were so many buffaloes in the wild upper country, particularly in South Carolina, that three or four men with their dogs could kill from ten to twenty in a day; but they soon receded before the advancing settlements, or fell a prey to the deadly rifle. Deer were so numerous, that a common hunter could easily kill four or five a day, and in the autumnal season as many bears as would make from two to three thousand weight of bear-bacon. Wikld turkies filled every thicket, and the water-courses teemed with the beaver, otter and musk-rat; while wolves, panthers, and wild-cats over-ran the country. Nothing could have better suited young Boones tastes and predilections, than such a profusion of game while it lasted. He had hither to hunted only for recreation; now he began to spend his autumns and winters in the woods, because he could unite profit with the pleasure derived from the roving and exciting characteristics of a hunter's life -- a life he learned to love so well. Furs and peltries bore a good price; and formed not only the frontier currency of that day, buit the chief article of remittance to the trading marts on the Atlantic. Every skin passed currently at its standard value. During the summer season Boone was more or less engaged for his father in teaming produce, pelts and furs to Salisbury, some twenty odd miles from the Boone settlement.> 2B39-40

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    Created: 7/4/2017 9:11:23 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24958
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24958


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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In 1753 30,000 deerskins were exported form NC; citing Wynne 2:299. 2B40

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    Created: 7/4/2017 9:12:19 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24959
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24959


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Catawba towns some sixty miles distant, Cherokees more remote. <The Indians often visited the new settlements of the Yadkin, temporarity pitched their camps at some convenient spot, and drove something of a barter-trade with their white neighbors. They lived on terms of peace and good will with the new settlers. Occasionally some mischief was committed, but it was invariably done, so far as can now be judged, by the Northern Indians in their warlike forays against the Catawbas and other Southern tribes.> 2B40

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    Created: 7/4/2017 9:13:15 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24960
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24960


1753-12-06

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<A signal instance, at this early period, of the devotion of the Catawbas to their white brethren, which ever after manifested itself on all suitable occasions, deserves our special notice. In July, 1753, a party of Northern Indians in the French interest made their appearance in rowan county, into which the Yadkin country had just been organized, committing various depredations upon the scattered injabitants. A band of faithful Catawbas sallied forth and encountered a detached party of the enemy, killed several of them, and put the rest to flight. The victorious Catawbas obtained the scalps of the slain; and among the spoils were silver crucifixes, beads, looking-glasses, tomahawks and other implements of war, all of which were of French manufacture.> (citing the Maryland Gazette, 12/6/53) 2B40-41

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    Created: 7/4/2017 9:14:57 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24961
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24961


1753-12-06

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<About this period Daniel Booine's great skill in hunting, and shooting at a mark, had become proverbial. Whites and Indians readily conceded it, except a distinguished Catawba of the name of Sucy Jack, who was envious of young Boone's pre-eminence with the rifle; and even he at length, was constrained to make the reluctant acknowledgment. But he resolved to have no superior alive, and, perhaps in his cups, dropped a few careless words, unwittingly betraying his intention to seek the first opportunity to sacrifice his successful rival. This quicdkly reached the ears of old Squire Boone, whose son Daniel then happened to be absent on a hunting excursion; and, Quaker as he was, the old gentleman's ire was so much roused, that he seized a hatchet, and set out in search of Saucy Jack, resolutely exclaiming, "Well, if it has come to this, I'll kill first!" Warning was immediately conveyed to Jack of his danger, who thinking discretion the better part of valor, fled the country, and remained absent until old Squire Boone's anger became appeased, and the affair comparatively forgotten. But Saucy Jack never more ventured to promulge [?] such foolish threats; he had, very likely, the fear of Daniel Boone's unerring rifle constantly before his eyes. The amicable relations which had hitherto existed with the Catawbas, influenced the people studiously to avoid every cause of rupture, and so the matter was suffered to die away. This anecdote serves strongly to illustrate the idea we have all along endeavored to inculcate, that Boone's ruling passiom was early developed; and that he became learned, if not in the lore of books, at least in that kind of knowledge, which excited the envy of the friendly, and the terror of the hostile Indians.> (Anecdote from Isiah Boone, son of Squire Boone, Jr.) 2B41-42

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    Created: 7/4/2017 9:16:53 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24962
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24962


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Seven Years War: <An all-wise Providence, however, seemed to have designed it for the training of a race of men fitted, in after years, to meet and conquer the combined power of Britain, her savage allies, and mercenary hirelings. Daniel Boone passed through this school of trial; and though not a conspicuous actor, he nevertheless acquired in its progress that knowledge of men and thing, which had a marked influence in effecting the subsequent exploration and settlement of the West.> 2B42

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    Created: 7/4/2017 9:18:28 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24963
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24963


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<The following fragment of an ancient backwood's ballad, commemorative of Braddock's defeat, and often sung in a plantive strain at many a frontier cabin fire-side, hs been preserved in the memory of the venerable pioneer Mrs. Lydia Shepperd Criger [?], near Wheeling: Sir Peter Halket whose courage was great, Fought like a soldier and would not retreat, He flew through the field, like Cato again, Saying 'fight on, brave boys!' -- ala, he was slain! Poor Brittons -- poor Brittons -- poor Brittons remember, Although we fought hard, we were forced to surrender. The Major his son did ride up and down, Courageously fighting for old England's crown, Until that he saw all attempts were in vain, From sighs and from tears he could scarcely refrain. Poor Brittons -- poor Brittons -- poor Brittons remember, Although we fought hard, we were forced to surrender.> 2B48

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    Created: 7/4/2017 9:19:23 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24964
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24964


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<Among the survivors [of Braddock's defeat] was Daniel Boone, who cut his team loose, and fortunately escaped by flight.> 2B49

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    Created: 7/4/2017 9:20:06 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24965
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24965


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Torture of the captured British by the Indians: <Twelve poor captives were taken, and hurried off to Fort Duquesne, with their bodies and faces painted black -- an unmistakable indication of the sad fate that inevitably awaited them; and that evening they were burnt by the savages on the banks of the Alleghany, in sight of the fort and unopposed by Contreceur. One at a time was tied naked to a stake, with his hands fastened above his head, then tortured with red-hot irons, and lighted pine splinters stuck in his body; and the shrieks of the victim, drowned in the horrid yells of his tormentors as they gaily danced around him, gradually became fainter and fainter, until death at length kindly relieved the sufferer. Another and another perished in the same awful manner, until all were sacrificed to this diabolical custom.> 2B49-50

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    Created: 7/4/2017 9:24:00 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24966
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24966


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Bryan family emigrated to the Yadkin country as early as 1746. Bryan Settleemnt at the Forks of the Yadkin. The Boone's provided them with some needed company. In 1753 William Bryan married Mary [?] Boone. It was probably at this wedding the DB first saw Rebecc a Bryan. Daughter of Joseph Bryan, scarcely 15 years old. <If Boone's eyes were ever "shined,," as Flint declares, THAT was the time and the occasion, and of one thing we are quite certain, that his heart, at all events, was "shined" by the love of a noble girl who was unconscious of warming into being new feelings and affections, of which young Boone had never before been the happy possessor.> 2B60-61

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    Created: 7/4/2017 9:25:15 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24967
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24967


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<They met a second time. It was the next season, during the early general warmth of summer, when cherries were ripe, and a number of young people were gathered together, sitting socially upon a ridge of green turn beneath the shady trees, enjoying the delicious fruit. Boone sat beside Rebecca, musing doubtless in his own mind whether she would make him a worthy help-mate; when, with apparent thoughtlessness, he took his knife and made several sad incisions [sic] in one corner of her white cambric apron -- an article rarely to be met with in the backwoods of that day. Her mild disposition forbade the thought of hastily checking her seemingly absent-minded lover, as most others would have done under similar circumstances. boone gained his popint. He only resorted to this singular expedient, as he used afterwards pleasantly to relate, TO TRY HER TEMPER; if it had been firy, he was certain she would fly into a passion. This was Boone's mode of studying character; and, in this instance, the experience of sixty years proved the correctness of his judgment.> 2B61

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    Created: 7/4/2017 9:26:30 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24968
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24968


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<Flint, in his bit of sentimental romance, represents Boone as encountering the fair Rebecca, in one of his nocturnal rambles, and mistaking her bright eyes for those of a deer, almost eventuating fatally; and closes by describing her as a "flaxen-haired" beauty. In all this, ther is not the least semblence of truth.> 2B63

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    Created: 7/4/2017 9:28:01 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24969
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24969


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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During the Cherokee War DB and wife, with two little sons, went in a two horse wagon to Culpeper County in eastern VA, residing in the settlement of the Fiel;ds, Greens, and Slaughters, who employed him with his team to transport tobacco to Fredericksburg. This anecdote, told by Isaiah Boone, relates to that period: <One of his employers sent a negro with a neck piece of bull beef for Boone's provision during one of his trips to Fredericksburg. Discovering at a glance that the meat was as firm and clammy as though it had really been a part of one of the ancient animals old Noah had driven into the ark and survived the flood, he directed the negro to lay it down; who, with all imaginable innocence, quietly placed it upon the nearest stump. STernly eyeing the bull beef for a moment with no very enviable feelings, Boone seized a billet of wood and commenced beating it all around the ground at a terrible rate, without seeming in the least to notice how busy it kept poor Sambo dodging from one place to another to prevent his shins colming in contact with the nimble handspike. Perfectly dumb-founded at this curious exhibition, the negro asked "massa Daniel," when he got through with his violent beating process, what it all meant? "Oh, nothing particularly," replied Boone with becoming gravity, "I thought it looked plaguy [sic] tough, and I was only trying to see if I could possibly make it tender; but it's all to no purpose." The negro reported the scene to his old master, who taking the hint, saw that Boone ever after fared as well as himself." 2B75-76

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    Created: 7/4/2017 9:29:57 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24970
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24970


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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2: <One Owens and wife, and a man named Harmon, were of the party, consisting of fully a dozen altogether, who had their head-quarters among the mountains in the wilderness. Two of this desperate band managed to kidnap a daughter of one of the Yadkikn selttlers, probably designing to doom her to the basest of purposes. The whole contry was roused, and the people formed themselves into different bands to go in pursuit, strongly suspecting that the girl had been taken by the outlaw-gang who had had long prowled among, and depredated upon, that suffering community. Daniel Boone, in common with his neighbors, was shocked by an event at once so bold and aggravating. He placed himself at the head of one of these pursuing parties composed of the unhyappy captive's father and five or six sympathising friends; and while pressing forward, far into the wilderness, the lost girl suddenly came running to them, all frightened and excited. When she first discovered them, she thought they were of the robber-band, until fortunately recognizing the well-known features of her father in the party. The meeting, under the circumstances, between the parent and daughter was peculiarly affecting; all seemed equally to partake of the joy -- for the lost one was found again. She soon related her simple story: How the two banditsw had abducted her, hurrying her through the woods by night and day, almost exhausting her delicate form as well by anxiety of mind as exposure, faltuge, and the laceration of her limbs by rocks and brambles.> 2B118-22 continued

File: 2B2.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 9:31:52 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24971
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24971


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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1: Attributes the rise of outlawry to the period of warfare, when everyone forted up with nothing to do, and other left the country, leaving their property to be plundered. <North Carolina was not entirely exempt from the rapine of these desperadoes. Forting upon her frontiers, had produced similar effects upon the naturally vicious and indolent. Scorning to work, and ashamed to beg, several of the more hardened of this class banded together in the mountain region, in the rear of the Yadkin settlements, where, in a quiet nook, they had formed a rude fort for the receptacle of their ill-gotten plunder, and for their protection in case their secluded retreat should happen to be discovered. Others, perhaps more timid, remained at their homes in the settlements, secreting their robber-friends by day, and aiding them by night in their villanous pursuits.> 2B118-22 continued

File: 2B2.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 9:32:54 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24972
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24972


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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3A: <When, at length, thinking themselves secure from pursuit, and perhaps well-nigh their forest-fort, the robbers employed their first leisure in getting embroiled in a dispute, most likely involving their respective claims to the captive-maiden; words soon led to blows, and furing a severe rencounter [?], the uoung land had the good fortune to escape from her desperate captors. Boone and his party, with the rescued girl for their guide, soon reached the spot where she left the rival bandits in fearful contention, and found one of the combattants [sic] weltering [?] in his gore and senseless. The other had fled. The wounded brigand was conveyed to Salisbury jail; but whether he died of his wounds, or his life paid the forfeit of his crimes, tradition is silent. We have in this instance another illustration of the maxim, that when rogues fall out, the honest and oppressed obtain their rights. About a year after this affair, a quantity of stolen goods were found concealed under the fodder-stack of one Cornelius Howard, a resident of the Yadkin country, who had hitherto borne a fair character.> 2B118-22 continued

File: 2B2.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 9:33:20 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24973
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24973


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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3B: <The evidence of his guilt so multiplied against him, that he confessed his connection with the clan without reserve; and piloted a large party, prominent among whom were Daniel and George Boone, to the secret-fort in the mountain region, many miles remote from the frontier settlements. The brigands mountain fortress was at length discovered beneath an over-hanging rocky cliff, with a large natural chimney, and a considerable area in front well-stockaded. It was the most secluded and fitly chosen place for its object, Boone used to say, that could well be imagined. There was no beaten path leading to or from it -- so careful were its wily occupants to avoid every sign that might chance to lead to their detection. Led on by Howaqrd, Boone and his party suddenly surrounded the encampment, and captured several of the freebooters, among whom were Owens and his wife. Harmon and a few others of the most active of the band managed to effect their escape, and others of the party were probably absent. Stores had been robbed, horses and catle stolen, farming utensils and almost every conceivable article taken by this daring and well-appointed band. The prisoners once secured, search was instituted for their hoarded plunder.> 2B118-22 continued

File: 2B2.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 9:33:49 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24974
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24974


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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4: <Goods were found in tree-gums, with a layer of straw and ashes on top, intended to convey the idea of leach-tubs. A large quantity of silks, dry goods, log chains, farming implements and household articles, were recovered. [a note suggests that all this comes from Samuel Boone, son of George who was along on this raid.] Mrs Owens was found within the rock-house on a bed, either sick or more probably feigning herself ill, and expressed a strong desire to see Cornelius Howard. He had scarcely appeared in sight, when she quickly drew a pistol, and would have shot him on the spot, had not the deadly weapon been snatched from her by some of the by-standers. Failing in this, she gave him a pretty fair specimen of low invective, branding him as a second Judas in the turpitude of his conduct. The culprits were bound, and taken to Salisbury jail, to await the rigors of the law, and satisfy the demands of justice. Mrs Owens soubriquet of JUDAS HOWARD became familarily known throughout that region; and, several years thereafter, that unfortunate man was stealthily shot from his horse at the crossing of a stream -- thus suffering the terrible penalty of having betrayed the outlaws of the Yadkin. But the clan was entirely broken. [Attributes this to "Nathan Boone and lady."> 2B118-22

File: 2B2.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 9:38:24 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24975
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24975


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<With the opening of 1762, abandoned cabins and deserted plantations were again occupied by the border settlers, who had long been habituated to flee for safety, and join their fellow fugitives in some pent-up fort [this known as "forting"], where they would pass an irksome, ungainful life of squalidness and ease. During the successive years of 1759, '60 and '61, the Yadkin settlers resorted to their forts whenever alarms were given of Indian invasions; the danger once over, they would venture back distrustfully to their homes only to fly again upon the earliest intimation of the massacre of some unsuspecting neighbor.> 2B111-112

File: 2B2.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 9:39:04 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24976
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24976


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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DB and Rebecca lived first in a cabin in his father's yard, then settled on Sugartree Creek in the Bryan Settlement. 2B64

File: 2B2.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 9:39:58 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24977
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24977


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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During the Cherokee War of 1759 Squire Boone Sr took his family to Maryland to stay with his cousin Samuel Boone, a gun smith, with whom Squire Boone, Jr., had been apprenticed. [NB: then how could Squire Boone, Jr., have told his son Isaiah about the affair with Saucey Jack? Must not have known about it first hand.] There were there for 3 years. 2B74-75

File: 2B2.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 9:41:15 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24978
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24978


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Did DB take part in the local actions during the Cherokee War? <Certain it is, that Boone, in his old age, used to speak familarily of that fortress [Fort Dobbs]; and the probability is, that he forted there with his family during this and the ensuing season.> 2B95

File: 2B2.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 9:41:57 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24979
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24979


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<Sometime in the course of this year [1760], he ventured over the mountains, either on a scout or hunt, perhaps both; and penetrated as far as what is now known as Boone's Creek, a small southern tributary of the Watauga river, in Washington county, East Tennessee, and about a hundred miles from the Cherokee towns on the Little Tennessee. Here he left a singularmemorial of that early adventure across the Alleghanies, perfectly in character with the man.> 2B96

File: 2B2.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 9:43:00 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24980
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24980


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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When Squire Boone Sr returned in 1761 [?], with him came Squire Jr, who had been bought out of the remaining one or two years of his apprenticeship. 2B112

File: 2B2.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 9:43:49 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24981
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24981


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Refers to the late conflict as the "French and Indian war" on 2B114

File: 2B2.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 9:45:00 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24982
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24982


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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In a note Draper, contending with an interpretation of Peck's gives an indication of his evidentiary sources: <There is no evidence, not even TRADITIONARY [emphasis added], to sustain this statement, and it must be regarded as erronous.> 2B122n

File: 2B2.DR1



    Created: 7/4/2017 9:46:07 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-24983
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-24983


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Deerskins in their best condition in the summer autumn. The long gray hair of winter-coats takes deep root in the skin, making it quite useless for leather-making. This is shed in the late spring (May), the coat taking on a red appearance; gradually this color gives way to blue in the fall, somewhat less valuable, then to winter gray. Thus the nomenclature of hunters and furtraders: "in the red," "short blue," or "gray." Bad time for deer hunting was good time for beaver trapping, and viceversa. (3B4)

File: 3B1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:50:43 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25121
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25121


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Preparing skins and furs was work for bad weather or evenings. 200-250 pounds was considered a load for a horse; beaver weighs about 1.25 pounds each, otter about 1 pound, so a horse could pack near to 200 of them. Deerskins were worth about .40 per pound, or $1 a skin, while beaver was worth about $2.50 each, otter $3-5. So that a horse load of beaver would be worth 5X as much as the same weight of deerskins. (3B15-16)

File: 3B1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:51:34 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25122
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25122


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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tied moccasins to their guns at night so that they could get them easily if forced to flee from Indians. Habit of lying with their feet to the fire. (3B16-17)

File: 3B1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:52:37 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25123
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25123


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John Stuart was 26 in 1770; had married DB's youngest sister in 1765; they had two daughters with a third on the way; common stature and pale complexion, lively mind. Warm and tender feelings, "entirely devoted to his family, and never had any difficulty with the companion of his bosom. Boone often said, that he never had a brother whom he loved and respected more than he did John Stuart; that he had all the confidence in him that one man could repose in another, and that he was strictly faithful in the fulfillment of his promises -- a most essential requisite, as Boone always declared, in hunting companions. . . ." Five years after his disappearance, during the construction of the Wilderness Road, his remains were found in a hollow sycamore tree, with his name engraved on the brass-band of his powder horn, and also with his saddle and bridle which also had his engraved name. (3B18)

File: 3B1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:53:47 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25124
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25124


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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DB found John Stuart's initials carved on a tree near his abandoned camp, when his companion turned up missing. (3B18)

File: 3B1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:54:17 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25125
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25125


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Draper on an inaccuracy in Simms: "It seems almost a pity to spoil such precious bits of romance by the narration of unvarnished truth. Our beautiful writers are not always our most accurate historians." (3B22n)

File: 3B1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:55:08 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25126
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25126


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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During his solitary sojourn in KY: Reached the KY River near present Leestown, a little above Frankfort, <where he say an Indian, sitting up the top of a fallen tree projecting partly over the water, and intently engaged in fishing. Speaking of it in after years to his family, Boone used simply to say, "while I was looking at the fellow, he tumbled into the river, and I saw him no more." It was understood from the manner in which he spole of it, that he shot and killed the Indian; yet he seemed not to care about alluding more particularly to it. He probably felt in no friendly mood toward the whole race of red-skins. They had, within a few months, robbed him and his companions of all their peltry, furs, horses, and other valuables, had twice captured him and Stuart, threatening them ominously, if they did not leave the country, with a terrible "stinging" from the wasps and yellow-jackets, and had finally given poor Stuart a mortal wound; and no doubt Boone thought this fellow was one of a large party near by, for whom he was fishing, and who might, very probably, discover him and thereby endanger his life, and thus, on the whole, he perhaps deemed it most prudent to have him out of the way. This act of Boone's, committed hundreds of miles from home or friends, he undoubtedly considered one of self-defence, and it may have been the means of preserving his life for great future usefulness to his family and country." Note the defensive tone in all this. (Citing Nathan and Isaiah Boone, 3B35-36)

File: 3B1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:56:28 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25127
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25127


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Draper on: "He was not merely a hunter. He wasn on a mission. The spiritual sense was strong in him. He felt the union between his inner [?] and the nature of the visible world, and yearned for their intimate connumion. His thoughts and feelings were those of a great discoverer. He could realize the feelings of a Columbus or a Balboa, and thus gazing over the ocean waste of forest which then spread from the dim western outlines of the Alleghanies, to the distant and untravelled waters of the Mississippi, he was quite as much isolated as was every any of the great admirals, who set forth, on the Atlantic, still dreaming of Cathay." (citing Simms, 3B26)

File: 3B1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:57:32 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25128
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25128


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Draper on the solitary DB in KY: "He lived in sight of liveliness, but on the vrge of danger. Beauty came to him with Terror looking over her shoulder. The wilderness was charming to the senses and the mind, but its thickets of green concealed the painted and ferocious savage; and he whod hunted the deer successfully through his haunts, might still, while keenly bent upon the chase, be unconscious of the stealthy footsteps which were set down in his own tracks." (3B25)

File: 3B1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:58:31 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25129
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25129


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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During his solitary sojurn (1770), near Dicks River, 3/4 mile above junction with KY; unexpectedly found hiimself hemmed in by Indians, leaving him the only alternative -- jumping down the cliff; leaped off into a sugar maple, down which he slid to the ground 60 feet below. Draper on sources for this: <This tradition we heard from old setlers in the Dick's River region several years ago, and since heard repeated by Isaiah Boone and Peter Wold, of Indiana, and the late venerable Capt. Henry Wilson, of Bourbon county, Kentucky.> (3B37)

File: 3B1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:59:20 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25130
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25130


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<It was characteristic of him to cut either his name or its initials on trees or in caves, as was the case with the tree-memorial in East Tennessee where he killed a bear, and on the tree over the cave on Shawnanse River; and we know that Boone, in the summer and autumn of 1770, spent much time wither alone or with his brother, in this very region. We feel, therefore, pretty safe in venturing to assume that he then occupied the two caves, and visited the remarkable knole [called Boone's Knole], in the present county of Jessamine, Kentucky, which have borne his name for nearly three quarters of a century.> (3B40n)

File: 3B1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 6:00:21 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25131
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25131


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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After the return of SQUIREBJR to KY, the two brothers set up camp in a cave near the mouth of Marble Creek on the KY River in Jessamine county; another camp in a cave near the mouth of Hickman Creek in the came county, a few miles lower down the KY. In this later cave DB's initials were seen for many years caved on its rocky side. Each of these caves have been named "Boone's Cave." (3B39-40)

File: 3B1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 6:01:25 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25132
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25132


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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DB would not eat beaver tail, although this was considered a delicacy by some hunters. (3B22)

File: 3B1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 6:02:08 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25133
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25133


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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In Mercer Co., KY, on Shawnee Run, flowing into KY River. A cave (known as Boone's Cave), a tree in front marked "D.B. -- 1770" (3B37)

File: 3B1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 6:03:04 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25134
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25134


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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DB's hat: DB told his grandson James, eldest son of Nathan, that during one of his Kentucky explorations, a wolf snatched up his hat where he had laid it for a few moments, making off with it, forcing DB to shoot him in order to recover it. (3B41n)

File: 3B2.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 5:46:03 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25171
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25171


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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After Squire's second return, and approaching winter, DB set out for VA, hoping to meet his brother on the way. <On the way, Boone came across a lone aged Indian, occupying a rude camp, who had apparently, perhaps in sickness, been abandoned and left to die, as being too old to be of any further service to himself or others. Touched with his pitiable appearance and helpless situation, Boone went back half a mile where he had killed a deer, and appropriated only a small portion of it to his own use, and carried the remainder to the old Indian, who, so far as looks and signs could express, evinced the sincerest gratitude for the kindness, when Boone left him to his fate.> (3B42, citing Daniel Bryan and Nathan Boone as sources.)

File: 3B2.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 5:48:00 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25172
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25172


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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After linking up with Squire for the 3d time, the brothers proceeded to the Green and Cumberland river country. There they encountered the Long Hunters, hunting on Green River. As Draper tells it: <They one day towards evening heard a singular noise some distance from them. Mausker, brave and thoroughly experienced in woodcraft, bid the others remain quiet, but ready to go to his relief should occasion require it, while he stole carefully from tree to tree, until finally approaching sufficiently near, he beheld, with mingled surprise and amusement, a man bare-headed, stretched flat upon his back, on a deer-skin spread on the ground, singing merrily at the top of his voice! It was Daniel Boone. He had just pitched his camp for night, and probably awaiting his brother's appearance, was amusing himself with a song, for which he cherished a natural love in common with woodmen generally; for with spirited songs of love and patriotism, interspersed with border narratives, Indian forays and hunting adventures, would they while [sic] away an evening before their cheerful campfires. (3B64, citing at 64n notes of conversations with the late Col. George Smith of Sumner county, TN and the mss letters of E. P. Connell of Mansker's Creek, TN, both of whom derived the anecdote from Col. Mansker; also cites Nathan Boone and wife, to whom DB often mentioned "his falling in with the Long Hunters in the Green River country.")

File: 3B2.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 5:48:46 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25173
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25173


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Alexander Neeley, who had first come with Squire, then left after the death of John Stuart: Native of PA, from the New River settlements; later made trip with Isaac Bledsoe to supply the Long Hunters; in Powell valley got separated from his party, lost in woods, alone for many days; killed a stray Indian dog for meat, which he packed in the dog's skin. Encountered by Squire on the brothers final way home; took to their camp and nursed -- by this time the dog meet was "alive with maggots." The Boones got him back on his way, and he later overtook his companions. After this trip Neely returned to New River; in 1785 removed to Cumberland country. In 1796 was killed with one of his sons in an Indian ambush at a spring near his house. Left wife, four sons, and "many" daughters. (3B65-67, 67n, citing the late Hugh H. Bell, a brother-in-law of Neely.)

File: 3B2.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 5:49:44 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25174
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25174


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Neely, with Bledsoe and others in the Cumberland country, after being nursed by the Boone brothers, at one point was exploring on his own; lay down to take a nap, and dreamed of being killed by Indians. <So vivid was the dream, that it alarmed and awakened him. While thinking of it, a gun was fired not apparently a hundred yards from him, and in a few moments a stricken deer came dashing through the bushes and fell dead almost at his feet. Knowing that Indians were close upon him> he retreated. Shows again the belief in dreams as omens of the future. (3B68, citing H. F. Bell, brother-in-law of Neely)

File: 3B2.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 6:00:02 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25175
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25175


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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On final return, overtaken by party of six or eight "Northern Indians" near Cumberland Gap in Powell's Valley. The brothers were in camp, roasting meat. Indians at first pretended friendship, sharing the Boone's hospitality; then asked to trade their inferior guns for the Boone's fine ones, upon refusal their mood changed, they overpowered the brothers, taking everything. <A small Indian then approaching Squire Boone, demanded his shot-pouch, with which the owner showing no disposition to part, the Indian seized hold of the strap by which the pouch was suspended around Boone's nec, when quite a lively scuffle ensued, and Boone at length gave his simble antagonist a violent whirl which sent him flying some distance, but with the Indian went also the strap, to which the fellow clinging firmly, it had broken by the propelling force that he had received from the powerful muscular exertion of the white hunter. So, after all, Squire Boone, through gaining the victory, lost his shot-pouch.> (3B69-70)

File: 3B2.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 6:00:55 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25176
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25176


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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After being robbed, the brothers fled to the settlements, where they raised a posse and returned on the trail of the Indians. One may shot a deer, which all thought stupid, for alerting their quary; but later it turned out that the Indians had been augmented with many others, and the deer-shot, convincing the men to turn back, had probably saved their lives. The Boones and one other man remained in Powell's valley, hold up in a deserted cabin. <Peering through the interstices of the cabin, the whites discovered a couple of Indians a short distance off, armed, finely dressed and eked [sic] out with ornaments, when all three fired, and both the Indians fell dead. In the division of the spoils, Daniel Boone and the other man each shared a gun, while the silver trinkets fell to the lot of Squire Boone. So our unfortunate hunters, blending this act of self-defence with the severe law of retaliation, obtained in return a safe retreat, with a moiety of their heavy losses.> (3B71-72)

File: 3B2.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 6:01:39 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25177
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25177


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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DB and his neighbors were a bit too removed to have participated in the conflict between Regulators and Gov. Tyron, <yet were not altogether ignorant of the growing exactions of wicked rulers of an arbitrary government. Boone was not the man tamely to submit to such oppression, and seemed bent on further explorations, and an early removal beyond the reach of the rapacious tax-gatherers and unlawful extortioners who then lorded it, with so high a hand, over the poor border inhabitants of North Carolina.> (3B90-91)

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    Created: 7/13/2017 6:03:19 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25178
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25178


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<How he spent the ensuing two and a half years after returning from his extended ramblings in Kentucky, his own scanty narrative is entirely silent. He was, however, busily employed during the cropping season at home, assisted by his sons James and Israel, while the remainder of each year found him searching the western wilderness for game and a suitable country for a new settlement. During this period, one Joe Robertson, an old weaver, who had a famous pack of bear-dogs and was devoted to the chase, often accompanied Boone into the Brushy Mountain, and over to the Watagua, securing loads of bear skins, which they packed to the settlements and sold. On one of their adventurous trips, they penetrated as far [as] the French Lick on Cumberland, and found several French hunters there.> (3B91, citing Nathan Boone, and Henry Rutherford of TN, with whose family Robertson boarded after the Revolution, and spoke many times of his hunting and exploring with DB)

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    Created: 7/13/2017 6:04:20 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25179
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25179


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Draper calls it a "scanty narrative." (3B91)

File: 3B2.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 6:05:14 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25180
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25180


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Years leading up to. <In May, 1772, Isaac Shelby, then a young man, met Boone below the Holston settlement alone -- such was his passion for adventure; and rehearsed to his new acquaintance with story of his former Kentucky exploration, and robbery by the Indians. (citing Nathan Boone, wife, letter of Daniel Pennington, a DB nephew) There is also reason to believe, that about the year 1772, Boone removed his family to the Watauga [struck out: probably just about a mile below the junction of Little Doe River, where Watauga Fort was subsequently located,] and there resided awhile; and thrn, from some cause, returned to his old place on the Yadkin.> (3B92)

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    Created: 7/13/2017 6:06:49 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25181
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25181


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<Early in 1773, Daniel Boone, Benjamin Cutbirth, and a few others, explored Kentucky and were greatly pleased with the country. Boone then, for a period, reoccupied his old cave on the right bank of Little Hickman Creek, in which is now Jessamine county, Kentucky, in which he had, probably, three years before taken up his temporary abode; there he carved the initials of his name and the year on the side of the cavern -- "D.B. -- 1773", and also, in like manner, on several beech trees near the mouth of the cave. Tradition has not preserved the particulars of this journey, and hence we may infer that only incidents of common occurrence attended the adventurers. So gratified were they with Kentucky, that they resolved at once to remove and settle permanently in the country.> (3B92)

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    Created: 7/13/2017 6:09:19 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25182
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25182


1844

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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James McAfee's Company, on their way home from KY, met DB 8/12/73, who was making preparations to migrate to KY. (3B93, citing Gen R.B. McAfee, SKETCHES OF THE SETTLEMENT OF KENTUCKY, FRANFORT COMMONWEALTH, 6/1/1844)

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    Created: 7/13/2017 6:17:00 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25183
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25183


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<Returning to the Yadkin, Boone paid a visit to the Bryan settlement, sixty miles south-east of his residence, where his brother-in-law, William Bryan, several other members of the Bryan connection, together with Benjamin Cutbirth and other hardy adventurers, consented to try their fortunes in the wilderness. It was arranged, that the Bryan party, who could cross the mouuntains more conveniently to the eastward of Boone's intended route, should join Boone's company in Powell's Valley on a specified day, and pass the most dangerous part of the journey together. Hastening home, Boone sold his farm, and such household goods, produce and farming utensils as he could not well convey go great a distance, when joined by five other families. . . .> (3B93)

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    Created: 7/13/2017 6:19:45 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25184
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25184


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Bryan party numbered 40 men. Left the families at home, planning to plant a settlement and bring their women and children after it was considered safe. Other men who joined at Fort Chiswell and Holston Valley regions included Michael Stoner, William Bush, Edward Jennings.

File: 3B2.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 6:20:29 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25185
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25185


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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James Boone, Henry Russell, and company heard wolves "or a successful imitation on the part of Indians," as seated around their campfire. The Mendinall boys were afraid, ridiculed by Crabtree -- a "regular backwoodsman:" <they would hear as well the bellowing of buffaloes as the howling of wolves in the tree-tops in Kentucky." (3B96)

File: 3B2.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 6:21:21 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25186
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25186


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Attacked as they slept, about day break, 10/10/73. <Young Russel was shot through both hips, and was unable to attempt an escape. As the Indians would run up with their kinves to stab him, he would seize the naked blade with his hands, and thus had them badly mangled, and was finally tortured in a most barbarous manner. Young Boone was also sho through his hips, breaking them both, and rendering him helpless. He recognized among the Indians Big Jim, a Shawanoe warrior, who had often shared the hospitalities of his father's house. His unusually high cheek bones and broad face, with a singularly peculiar chin, rendered it almost impossible for any one, who had ever known him, to fail instantly to recognize his remarkable features. James Boone implored him by name to spare his life, but former friendship, past favors, nor present misfortunes made any sensible impression on the adamantive [?] heart of the blood-thirsty warrior. The Indians tortured young Boone by pulling out his toe and finger nails, when he besought Big Jim at once to put him out of his misery. At the same time young Russell was suffering similar tortures, when Boone remarked to him that he presumed his parents, brothers and sisters were all killed by the Indians. At length both the young sufferers were severely stabbed, and probbly tomahawked, when death, like an angel of mercy, came to their relief.> (3B97)

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    Created: 7/13/2017 6:22:19 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25187
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25187


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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From the Boone family bible: "James Boone, Son of Daniel and Rebecca Boone, born May 3d, 1757, was killed October ye 10th, 1773, by the Indians." (3B96n)

File: 3B2.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 6:23:21 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25188
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25188


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Mendinalls and Drake both killed. One of these ran off and his body was not found until years later, wedged between two high ledges of rock, about an eighth of a mile from the camp. Crabtree was wounded, but escaped to spread the alarm. The slave Adam hid, then escaped, but was 11 days in reaching the settlements. His was the testimony that implicated Big Jim. The other slave, Charles, was carried off "with the horses and every article they [the Indians] esteemed of any value. When they had gone about forty miles, getting into a dispute about the owership of the negro, the leader of the party put an end to the quarrel by tomakawking the poor captive.> (3B98)

File: 3B2.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 6:34:32 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25189
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25189


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<In the advance-camp was a young fellow who had been detected in pilfering from his comrades, and had become thebutt of contempt and ridicule of the camp to such an extent that he resolved secretly to abandon the party and return to the settlements. He took his silent departure awhile before day on the morning of the fatal 10th of October; and on the way, stole some deer-skins which Danikel Boone had left hung up beside the trail for the rear to bring along. Reaching the ford at Walden's Creek when the Indians could have but a few moments before decamped, he came upon the mangled remains of the unfortunate slain; when, dropping the skins, he hastened back to the main camp, where he arrived, about sun-rise, with the unhappy intelligence.> Squire and a small party was sent back to bury the dead and recover whatever property the Indians had left; DB remained to defend against an attack, leading the making of a "rude fortification." (3B99)

File: 3B2.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 6:38:20 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25190
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25190


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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When SB and party reached the scene, Capt. Russell and Gass were already there. <In young Russell's body, which was mangled in an inhuman manner, was left sticking a dart-arrow; and beside all the bodies were left soveral painted hatchets and war-clubs -- a sort of Indian declaration of war. Mrs. Daniel Boone had sent sheets for shrouds, and young Boone and Russell were srapped in the same winding sheet and buried together. . . . The other two slain were also decently interred. The bodies of all were ripped open, but none of them were scalped, as the Indians would not venture to take white scalps to their towns in time of professed peace. The Indians had taken all the plunder, and the cattle were much scattered.> (3B100)

File: 3B2.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 6:40:10 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25191
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25191


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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After the attack, there was a "general council." <Though it was Daniel Boone's wish to continue the journey, the most of the emigrants were so much disheartened by the check they had received, tnd thought that only repetitions of Indian cruelty could be expected should they persevere in their attempt, that it was deemed best to abandon the enterprise and return.> <With Boone the blow was doubly severe -- the loss of his oldest son, and the postponement, perhaps forever, of his darling plan of rescuing Kentucky from the grasp of the savage and the wilderness.>

File: 3B2.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 6:41:02 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25192
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25192


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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After returning to the Powell valley, DB accepted the invitation of Capt. Gass to take up remporary residence in a cabin on his farm, about 7-8 miles below Russell's at Castle's-woods, and a bit south of Clinch River. <Boone was, most likely, induced to this step by the hope of being joined, the ensuing spring, by Capts. Gass and Russell in another attempt to permanently occupy Kentucky.> (3B101)

File: 3B2.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 6:42:16 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25193
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25193


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Who were the Indians? Some time before clearly known. Two Cherokee chiefs with the rest Shawnees. <When Gov. Dunmore made a demand upon the Cherokees for satisfaction, John stuart, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, despatched his deputy, Alexander Cameron, to Cho-tee, where he arrived in the beginning of September ensuing, and suceeded, after much opposition from the young warriors, in having the chief principally implicated in the murder, named NOT-TA-WA-QUA, put to death. The executioners first appointed to carry the sentence into effect, wounded the culprit in several places, and left him for dead; but recovering, and almost out of danger from his wounds, Mr. Cameron renewed his requisition, and, with much difficulty and danger to himself, prevailed upon the principal chiefs to go in person and finish him, which they executed with much resolution, maugre [?] all the threats and opposition of his numerous relations and followers; and made several spirited harangues to their people on the occasion, warning them not to follow the example of Not-ta-wa-qua, lest they should meet the same disgraceful fate, and reprimanding them, in sharp terms, for their bad behavior on that and other occasions, which brought the young warriors to make their humble submission to their chiefs, and presenting, as a token thereof, several strings of white beads. The other Cherokee chief concerned in this tragedy, was also condemned, but found means to make his escape to the Chickasaws; but was, not long after, caught, confined, and ultimately paid the forfeit of his crime. Gov. Dunmore, in a Proclamation issued shortly after, pronounced this conduct on the part of the Cherokees, a "remarkable instance of their good faith and strict regard to justice."> (3B101-102)

File: 3B2.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 6:43:52 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25194
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25194


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<In his speech at Fort Pitt, Dunmore charged the murder of young Russell and his companions as having been chiefly perpetrated by the perfidious Shawanoes, and enumerated it among hte chief causes that led to the Indian war of 1774. At Dunmore's treaty at Camp Charlotte, some of the plundered property belonging to Capt. Russell, consisting of books and farming implements, was delivered up.> (3B103)

File: 3B2.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 6:45:24 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25195
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25195


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<The cause of this cruel murder, may unquestionably be found in the growing jealousy of the Indians in consequence of the rapid extension of the white settlements, circumscribing the limits of their hunting grounds; pleading, in extenuation of the act, the permission or order of Cameron to rob all white intruders on their lands, by which the profligate portion of the savages became both their judges and executioners.> (3B103)

File: 3B2.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 6:46:28 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25196
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25196


1853

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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DB encountered by Col. George Christian, a "living eye-witness:" "I have a distinct recollection of seeing Boone at my father's camp, on Reedy Creek of Holston, in company with a tall young man named Crabtree, and some others -- I think it must have [been] in 1773. Boone was dressed in deer-skin colored black, and had his hair plaited and clubbed up, and was on his way to or from Powell's Valley." (3B106-07, citing "ms. letter of the venerable Col. George Christian, Aug. 25th, 1853)

File: 3B2.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 6:54:18 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25197
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25197


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Draper on the period after the failure of KENTUCKREMOVE1: <Alas, exclaims a faithful writer on western history -- alas for our woodman! Another year of quiet, stupid repose and farm labor seemed destined to try his patience. Dozing in security under his stoop by the westward flowing stream, he sighed for the howl of the wolf, and the stealthy, scarce-leaf-rustling tread of the Shawanoese. He dozed, but dreamed not how rapidly, since he left them, his fellow white-men had desecrated the solemn forest-temples he had wandered and worshipped in. All that summer of 1773 had Mammon been sending his pioneers into the wilderness, -- surveyors and speculators.> Washington, George Rogers Clark, Thomas Bullitt, Hancock Taylor, James Douglas, the McAfee company "all engaged in securing the choice lands of the country, at the Falls of Ohio, and on the Kentucky and Salt rivers." (3B107) <Gallant men were many of these adventurers, and they loved dearly the life of danger they led. [struck out: Far] [added:] Though some of them may perhaps have been [end addition] superior to Boone in the power of planning, in grasp of intellect, in education, fortune, and demeanor, there were still few or none of them his equals in forest-craft and a simple love of forest-life. They measured out, with cool, scientific, money-loving eyes, the glorious valleys and greensward woods, at sight of which Boone's lids had run over with tears of delight. They laid out towns where he had fancied the buffalo and deer would congregate forever; and though already the fierce mutterings of the tribes beyond the Ohio reached their ears, and they knew a contest to be inevitable, they lingered, rod and chain in hand, on the pleasant banks of the Elkhorn, or by the cave-born rivulets that feed the Kentucky.> (3B108)

File: 3B2.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 6:55:54 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25198
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25198


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Draper, writing of the causes of the war: <A storm was now impending -- the Indian outbreak of 1774, that boded no good to the border settlements. During the ten years of nominal peace, but, in truth, of QUASI war, succeeding Bouquets treaty of 1764, more lives were sacrificed along the western frontiers than during the entire Indian war of 1774, including the battle of Point Pleasant. Indians had wantonly murdered whites, and whites as wantonly butchered Indians. Traders had been robbed and murdered, not infrequently super induced by their over-grasping, rapacity; and Indians, in turn, inveighted beyond human sight and treacherously slain. Crimination began re-crimination, and Indians and whites alike looked with distrust upon each other. "Whoever," says Mr. Jacob, in his life of Cresap, "saw an Indian in Kentucky," or, in deed, any where in the great wester valley, "saw an enemy -- no questions were asked on either side -- but from the muzzles of their rifles." Party quickly followed upon the heels of party, with the significant chain and compass, and innumerable notched trees for landmarks as a sequence, told but too plainly that the tide of emigration would still roll westwardly with its portentous volume constantly increasing. It is not strange, then, that the ever jealous Indians brooded, with fearful apprehension, over the accumulating evidences, that they would soon have to give way before the progressive settlements.> (3B112-13)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 7:00:51 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25199
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25199


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<The opinion has been advanced, in the excellent work of Mr. Withers, that the war of 1774 virtually had its commencement in the attack on Boone's party in Powell's Valley; and that, in the interval of time between that event and the opening of the ensuing season, nothing could, perhaps, be done by the Indians, but make preparations for hostilities in the spring. "Indeed it very rarely happens," continues Mr. Withers, that the Indians engage in active war durint the winter; and there is, moreover, a strong presumption, that they were for some time ignorant of the fact that there were adventurers in the country, and consequently they knew of no object there on which there hostile intentions could operatie. Be this as it may, it is certain that, from the movements of the Indians at the close of the winter, the belief was general, that they were assuming a warlike attitude, and meditation a continuance of hostilities. War was certainly begun on their part, when Boone and his associates were attacked and driven back to the settlements; and if it abated for a season, that abatement was attributable to other causes than a disposition to remain quiet and peaceable while the country was being occupied by the whites." (3B113-14, citing "Wither's Chronicles of Border Warfare:110-11)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 7:04:39 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25200
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25200


1774

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Capt. Daniel Smith to Col. Wm Preston, 3/22/74, Clinch River settlements: "The people on this river are much more fearful of the Indians than I expected to find them. The late reports alarmed them so much, that four families in my neighborhood moved over to Holston before I heard of their getting off; they went in such haste that they left all their stock, and the greatest part of their household furniture. When they got to Holston, they heard news that mitigated their fears a little, and they ventured back again to take care of their effects; there I saw them and prevailed on them to stay." (quoted in 3B115)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 7:13:32 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25201
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25201


1774

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<To allay the fears of the people on the Clinch and Holston frontiers, Capt. Wm. Russell returning from Williamsburg to Clinch River, employed, by order of Col. Wm. Preston, Richard Stanton, Edward Sharp, Ephraim Drake and Wm. Harrold, to proceed as spies, on the 15th of April, to the head of Powell's Valley, and there, on or near the Warriors' Path, to look out particularly for Indian sign; if they should discover any, and the Indians should appear to be directing their course towards the settlements, then to return and give speedy notice; otherwise to proceed along the boundary line between Virginia and the Cherokees as far as the watercourse on which it terminated, and ascertain whether that stream was the Cumberland or Louisa, and on their return, make out a report, under oath, for the use of the Assembly. "And," copntinues Capt. Russell, "tho' we are apprehensive that the Cherokees and Northward Indians intend war, yet should you by accident fall in with any of their parties, you are to avoid acting towards them in a hostile manner, unless in cases of the last extremity, because the least hostility committed by you, at this time, when the Indians appear ripe for war, would not only blast our fairest hopes of settling the Ohio country, but be attended with a train of concomitant evils, and doubtless involve the Government in a bloody war." (William Russell, ms. instructions, 4/15/74, from Preston Papers, quoted in 3B118-19)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 7:16:26 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25202
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25202


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Southwestern VA, DB's area, exempted from the first of the hostilities of the war. 5/74 DB started alone on a hunt to Powell's Valley, planning to visit the grave of James. Found that the wolves had disturbed the grave: rolled off the logs that had been placed over for protection and scratched down some distance into the grave. DB dug up to see that the bodies had not been disturbed. With a stick he disinterred the remains, which the wolves had not reached. <Fresh blood was yet visible upon their mangled heads -- the hair upon both was plaited, in accordance with the custom of that day. Boone could easily distinguish the two apart, though about the same age, and both much disfigured; his son had fair hair, while young Russell's was decidedly black.> After he had finished their arose a severe storm. <During its continuance, from the melanchol associations and gloominess of the place, mingled with the dismal howlings of the storm, Boone felt more dejected, as he used afterwards to relate, than he ever did in all his life.> Made camp a few hundred yards away. Could not sleep. After a while he distincly heard Indians stealthily approaching his camp. DB crept quietly away, carefully drove his horse before him, leaving the bell "open" the better to deceive the Indians, until he had passed through a narrow defile on Walden's Creek, when he stopped the bell and "decamped" as rapidly as possible. <He could never, in after years, speak of this affecting incident, even to his own family, without having his feelings deeply stirred within him.> (citing conversations with Nathan Boone and wife, 3B120-21)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 7:18:08 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25203
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25203


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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After word of the outbreak of hostilities on the Ohio reached southwestern VA, Capt. David Gass and Michael Stoner were sent as scouts to KY; they found some deserted cabins, but no Indians. Spent some time hunting and trapping. Capt. Daniel Smith wrote [to Preston?] "at the close of June": "I have had two scouts for some time past down a river called Louisa; they have been down there one trip, and brought word that there is no fresh sign of Indians." (quoted from Preston Papers in 3B133)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 7:19:23 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25204
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25204


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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About the middle of June, 1774, Crabtree (of the Wallenridge incident) was present at a horserace on the Watauga River; there he killed a noted Cherokee named Billy, a relation of old Outacite. <It was a dastardly outrage, committed under the shadow of night, and created no small fear lest a war with the Cherokees should be the consequence; but by the prudent management of the Watauga settlers in despatching James Robertson and Willim Fallin as messengers to the Cherokee towns, to disavow the act in their behalf, together with the wisdom and forbearance of the old chiefs, peace was preserved. Efforts to bring Crabtree before the courts, failed either in the prosecution or conviction.> (3B122, citing letters of Maj. Arthur Campbell and Col. Wm. Christian in Preston Papers and Haywood, TENNESSEE:43-44)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 7:21:22 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25205
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25205


1774

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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6/20/74 Col. Preston authorized Capt. Russell to employ two "faithful woodmen" to travel through KY notifying the surveyors of their danger. Capt Russell replied from Clinch (Sunday 6/26/74) that the orders had reached him the previous day, the morning of the muster of his company; DB was probably present. He reported he read to the people so much of the dispatch as was necessary for their satisfaction, when they voted to build two forst on Clinch, in as convenient localities as could be selected, and "we shall begin instantly to erect them." Continues: "I am semsible, good sir, of your uncommon concern for the security of Capt. Floyd and the gentlement with him, and I sincerely sympathize with you, lest they should fall a prey to such inhuman, blood-thirsty devils as I have so lately suffered by; but may God, of his infinite mercy, shield him and company from the present impending danger! And could we, through Providence, be a means of preserving such valuable members, by sending out scouts, such a procedure would, undoubtedly, be of the most lasting and secret satisfaction to us, and the country in general. I have engaged to start immediately on the occasion, two of the best hands I could think of -- Daniel Boone and Michael Stoner; who have engaged to search the coun try as low as the Falls, and to return by way of Gasper's Lick on Cumberland, and through Cumberland Gap; so that, by the assiduity of these men, if it is not too late, I hope the gentlemen will be apprized of the imminent danger thay are daily in." (Russell to Preston, 6/26/74, Preston Papers, quoted in 3B123-24)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 7:23:01 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25206
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25206


1774

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Preston (6/27/74) ordered out 150 men under Col. Wm. Christian, assisted by Capts. Wm. Campbell and Walter Crockett, to range along the frontiers; Campbell to Moccasin Gap and the Big Island of Holston, Crockett to the head of Clinch and Blue Stone, Christian to Castles-woods on Clinch. Christian wrote from Russell's (Tuesday 7/12): <I found that Boone and Stoner had set off yesterday two weeks, in search of the surveyors: They wer to go down the Kentucky to your salt lick; from thence across the country to the Falls of Ohio, and from there home by way of Gasper's Lick on Cumberland River. If they find them [the surveyors] on the Kentucky, they will be back in a few days; if not till they go to the Falls, it will brobably be ten days from this time before they return. Capt. Russell thinks they have passed the Falls some days ago, as Boone would lose no time if he could not find the people. Thismakes me think it unnecessary to send Drake, as I before proposed, until Boone's route is known.> He proposes an expedition of 200 men directly across the country to burn the Shawnee towns, and adds: <I confess I want to delay some time to see whether Boone returns, and by that time every thing could be well fixed.> (from the Preston Papers, quoted in 3B124-25)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 7:25:35 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25207
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25207


1774

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Russell to Preston, 7/13/74. Three not two forts had been built: one at David Cowan's in Castle's-woods, sometimes called Cowan's or Russell's Fort, but which Russell himself named Fort Preston; second ten miles above at Capt. Daniel Smith's named Fort Christian; and a third, five miles below Castle's-woods, at William Moore's called Fort Byrd. Christian stationed ten men at Fort Preston, and also at Blackmore's Fort near the mouth of Stoney Creek, where four families had collected; the other two stations were very strong in men. DB's family repaired to Moore's Station (Fort Byrd), which was only two miles off. In this letter Russell speaks thus of DB's mission to KY: <I am in hopes, that in about two or three weeks from this time, Mr. Boone will produce the gentlemen surveyors here, as I can't believe they are all killed. Boone has instructions to take different routes till he comes to the Falls of Ohio; and if no discovery there, to return home through Cumberland Gap, which will give them opportunity to discover if they are about the upper entrys on Salt Lick [Licking] River, or have advanced towards Cumberland River, to make what few surveys were to be there -- in which tour, if they are alive, it is indisputable but Boone must find them. I have kept the other scouts out continually on duty, some to watch the head of Kentucky, and between that and Sandy Creek, and the others about Cumberland Gap and down Clinch River; and, as they are men that may be depended on, I hope the enemy cannot come upon us without being discovered before they make a stroke; if so, there is a probability of rewarding them well for their trouble between this and the Ohio.> (letter in Preston Papers, quoted in 3B125-26)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 7:34:40 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25208
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25208


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Draper says DB kept a journal of his trip to warn the surveyors with Stoner, "which has long since been unfortunately lost." <Having been employed for that service, apparently at Capt. Russell's muster on Clinch, on Saturday, June 25th, Boone received his instructions, and returned home; and having respected the Sabbath, the two adventurers, on Monday morning of the 27th of June, plunged into the wilderness, relying for food and safety upon Divine Providence, their own sagacity, woodcraft, and well-tried rifles. They thus walked by faith, proving their faith, by their works; and He who feeds the fowls of the air, and suffers not a sparrow to fall to the ground unnoticed, watched over and protected these lone messengers of humanity.> (3B126-27)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 7:36:09 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25209
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25209


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Anecdote from this trip with Stoner, from DB himself. The two came to a remarkable horseshoe bend in some small stream, where on a narrow point of some elevation was impregnated with salf, and had been gradually eaten away on both sides by buffalo, until the cavities met. Entering the lick, Stover discovered a buffalo through the aperture on the other side, and called to DB: "Sthop, Gabtain, and we will have shum fun." He slipped forward, and taking off his cap, suddently thrust it through the small aperture in the frail partition between the carities, directly into the face of the buffalo. The animal quickly butted the partition and came through up to his shoulders; Stoner wheeled and ran, yelling at the top of his voice: "Schoot her, Gabtain! SCHOOT HER, GABTAIN!" DB rolled on the ground in a fit of convulsive laughter. (from Nathan Boone, quoted on 3B127-28)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 7:37:27 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25210
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25210


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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DB and Stoner returned after absence of 61 days on 8/26/74. Maj. Arthur Campbell [to Preston?], 8/28/74. <Capt. Floyd seems very uneasy at the way Drake has used him, as he now plainly discovers that he was expecting to be appointed to a separate command. For this reason, and to relieve Floyd's anxiety, I wrote pressingly to Mr. Boone to raise men with all expedition to join Capt. Floyd; and I did not doubt but you would do everything in your power to encourage him. And what induced me particulary to apply to Mr. Boone, wa seeing his Journal last night, and a letter to Capt. Russell, wherein he professes a great desire to go on the expedition, and I am well informed he is a very popular officer where he is known. So I hope Capt. Floyd will still succeed, as I have good reason to believe. Mr. Boone will get all in Capt. Looney's company that intended to go with Bledsoe, and perhaps you can assist a little out of Waggoner's recruits, as I have heard to-day he is likely to get some men. I have been informed that Mr. Boone tracked a small party of Indians from Cumberland Gap to near the settlements. Upon this intelligence, I wrote pressingly to Capt. Thompson to have a constant lookout, and to urge the spies strictly to do their duty.> (from Preston Papers, quoted in 3B132-33)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 7:38:35 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25211
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25211


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Arthur Campbell to Preston, n.d. [probably 10/17/74]: <As Mr. Boone is to be the bearer hereof, he can inform you particularly of the news this way. You will see by the inclosed, that your old acquaintance, William Page, wants a commission. He now acts as sergeant at Fort Preston. I believe he is a fit man enough, on many accounts, to be an officer, and I would be glad could you gratify him with a commission, should it not interfere with others already appointed, which I am afraid will be the case, as either Vance, or Capt. Looney's ensign, is intended for that station. I wish Mr. Boone's application, or rather ye. people's for him, may not have a similar tendency. I think it is men, and not particular officers, they stand in most need of. Of this much I am informed, that it was not proposed by Mr. Boone to petition you as they do; but it arose from a notion that a distant officer would not be so particularly interested for their safety, as he who lives among them; and some disgust at Capt. Looney for being away at home the time of the late alarm, which he pleads, in excuse, that he wanted to see to the safety of his own family, when Roberts's was killed in his neighborhood.> (Preston Papers, quoted on 3B152)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 7:39:44 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25212
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25212


1774-10-13

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Capt. Daniel Smith to Preston, 10/13/74, from Castle's-woods: <Whilst I was in the lower settlements I was shown a petition signed by many of the inhabitants, representing their situation to be dangerous because they have been so irregularly supplied with the number of men allotted to the district; and also requesting you to appoint Mr. Boone to be a captain, and to take charge of these lower forts, so that he may be at liberty to act without orders from the Holston captains, who, by their frequent absence, leave the inhabitants sometimes in disorder. Instead of signing this paper, I chose to speak my sentiments to you concerning Mr. Boone and the paper which I suppose he will shew you. As to the paper, I believe it contains the sense of a majority of the inhabitants in this settlement. Mr. Boone is an excellent woodman. If that only would qualify him for the office, no man would be more proper. I do not know of any objection that could be made to his character, which would make you think him an improper person for that office. There may possibly be some impropriety in it because of Capt. Russell when he returns, but of this you are much the best judge.> (Preston Papers, quoted on 3B151-52)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 7:40:48 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25213
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25213


1774-10-13

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Shortly after the second attack on Blackmore's, Daniel Smith and DB arrived with a party of 30 men. The next night they had some or their horses stolen by Indians, and the next morning Smith, DB with 26 men set out after the thieves. Capt. Smith wrote to Preston, 10/13/74: <I am this far on my return from the lower settlements to the head of the river. Mr. Boone can inform you of the bad success we've had after the inhuman savages -- the murders they've committed, and the mortification w've suffered of putting horses into a pen adjoining the fort for the Indians to take away, and whose trace we could by no means discover. I shall be as expeditious as possible in getting to the head of the river, lest they should invade those parts that are particularly under my care.> (from Preston Papers, quoted on 3B149)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 7:42:13 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25214
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25214


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Friday, 9/23, party of Chief Logan [perhaps with some Cherokee warriors] appeared before Blackmore's Fort on Clinch. Finding some negroes without the fort, they succeeded in capturing two, a third saved by Mr. John Blackmore. Cattle and horses wantonly shot down. Left a war-club before the fort as an "emblem of defiance." Logan's party went 30-40 miles south to King's Mill on Reedy Creek (flows from the northeast into the South Fork of Holston); there resided a "lonely forester of the name of John Roberts" with his family. The Indians fell upon them, killing all on Saturday, 9/24. Only his son James, about 10 years old, escaped death, was made prisoner. The other settlers fled to King's Fort; as an eyewitness later wrote to Draper, "It was a skittish time with the women, you may be sure." One of Robert's children was recovered, still alive; Maj. Campbell wrote that they boy <received but one tomahawk blow on the back of his head which cut through the scull; but it is generally believed his barins are safe, as he continues to talk sensibly, and being an active, wise boy, what he relates is credited. For my part, I don't know as I ever had tenderer feelings of compassion for any of the human species. I have sent for him, and employed an old man that has some skill to attend him. I wish I could get Dr. Lloyd to him, if he cannot come, please try if he cannot send me up some medicine with directions. I have been too tedious and circumstantial in relating the little hero's story, but as it seems to be a singular instance, I am persuaded you will not be displeased with it.> A few days later he wrote again: <The boy that was scalped is dead. He was an extraordinary example of patience and resolution to his last, frequently lamenting that "he was not able to fight enough to save his mamma."> (quoting letters of Mar. Arthur Campbell, 9/26,29 10/3,6,12 in Preston Papers, AMERICAN ARCHIVES I:208, 808, 3B139-42)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 7:54:32 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25215
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25215


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Indian depredations in DB's area, while he was in KY: Capt. John Dickinson in skirmish with a party on the Greenbriar about 6/28. 7/31 attack on the Kelleys on the same river. 8/7 party of two Indians and a white renegade attacked several persons, mostly children near the residence of Balser Lybrook, where two other families were also holdup, on Sinking Creek of New River in what is now Giles county, VA; old Lybrook wounded, 3 children (including one infant) killed, also one young woman named Scott and a child of the widow Syndoe, nearly all of whom were in a canoe; several other children narrowly escaped, 3 boys (sons of John McGriff and the widow Syndoe) captured, but later stole away from the Indians while encamped near the Clover Bottom of Blue Stone River, about midnight of the succeeding Tuesday, and later found in the woods by some scouts on the next Friday morning. Col. Preston, 8/13: <Sundry other people have also been murdered along the frontier parts of the neighboring coun ties. The inhabitants of Fincastle, except those on Holston, are chiefly gathered into small forts, also great numbers in Botetourt; as Indians are frequently seen, and their sign discovered, in the interior parts of both counties. Such is the unhappy situation of the people, that they cannot attend their plantations; nor is it in the power of the scouts and paries on duty to investigate the nroads of the enemy, as they come in small parties, and travel among the mountains with so much caution.> (citing letters of Arthur Campbell, 8/9 and 10; and of Capt. James Rovertson, 8/12; Kercheval msss; Howe's Virginia:278; AMERICAN ARCHIVES, 1:707, on 3B133-34)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 7:56:08 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25216
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25216


1774-10-01

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Arthur Campbell to Col. Preston, 10/1/74: <Mr. Boone also informs me that the Indians have been frequently about Blackmore's since the negroes were taken, and Capt. Looney having only eleven men cannot venture to go in pursuit of them. Mr. Boone has sent me the war-club that was left, it is different from that left at Blackmore's, and Boone thinks it is the Cherokees who are now annoying us. I rather believe it is some of Maj. McDonald's desperate fugitives [McDonald with 400 men had attacked the Wappatomika towns on the Muskingum in July, killed a few Indians, dispersed others, and burned half a dozen villages and destroyed a considerable quantity of corn] that have taken refuge somewhere on the Ohio back of us, and would willingly deceive us into the belief that it is the Cherokees, that they may thus succeed in creating a misunderstanding between us and the old chiefs.> (from Preston Papers, quoted in 3B144)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 7:59:17 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25217
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25217


1774

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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9/13 3 Indians attacked one of Capt. Smith's soldiers about half mile from the Maiden Spring station; he returned fire and hit one. A party of whites who happened to be within hearing range hurried to the spot, chased the other two Indians. Found blood on the ground, followed its trail to a cave into which the wounded man had crawled. Maj. Campbell wrote (9/17/74, in Preston Papers): <The pit is to be searched by means of letting a man down by ropes, with lights, as our men are anxious to get his scalp.> For, as Draper quotes [from who?] <whoever could truthfully assert, that he had "killed an Indian AND GOT HIS HAIR" was certain to be regarded as a man of uncommon prowess, and worthy of all the praise a grateful frontier people could bestow.> (3B136-37)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 8:02:19 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25218
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25218


1774

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Capt. Floyd to Preston, 8/28/74 (copied from originals in the possession of Col. Nathan Hart of KY). <You will hear of Mr. Boone's return, and desire of going out. If Mr. Drake gets a berth down there, and does not immediately return to me and assist according to your instructions, pray let Boone join me and try. Capt. Bledsoe says Boone has more interest [influence?] than any other man now disengaged; and you know what Boone has done for me by your kind directions -- for which reason I love the man. But yet do as you think proper in everything respecting me.> (quoted in 3B133)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 8:03:13 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25219
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25219


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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9/74 Indian depredations were small, but kept the people in constant apprenhension in DB's area. 9/8 Samuel Lammey taken prisoner on the North Fork of Holston; same time families of John and Archibald Bushanan narrowly escaped. Same day party of 12-15 Indians fired upon John Henty while standing in his own doorway, 4 miles from Fort Christian on Clinch River, and dangerously wounded him; he fled into the woods, leaving his wife and three children, still in bed, to be captured by the enemy. The man died. The people fled to Maj. Arthur Campbell's at the Royal Oak, on the Middle Fork of Hoston. Scarcity of amunition everywhere. (citing AMERICAN ARCHIVES, 1:808, 3B135-36)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 8:04:45 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25220
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25220


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<Though there is some reason to believe that Boone may have served as a militia captain on the Upper Yadkin, and was sometimes so denominated prior to actual service in the Indian war of 1774, yet up to this period, he never really ranked, in that conflict, higher than a leiutenant. But his neighbors, who best could judge of his merits and efficiency, deemed him worthily entitled to the notice and promotion of his country. The movement originated entirely in the hearts and affections of the people.> (3B151)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 8:06:16 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25221
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25221


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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In response to the petition, Preston promoted Boone to captain, using blank commissions signed by Gov. Dunmore. This commission was preserved by DB; he showed it to Hamilton during his captivity, and was later sent by his descendants "some sixteen years ago" [circa 1840] accompanying a memorial to Congress for renumeration for his services. (3B152,153n)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 8:07:17 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25222
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25222


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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DB had actually started out with a number of recruits, to join the troops already on the march to the rendezvous at the Great Levels of Greenbriar, but was overtaken in a day or two with orders to return to Clinch and aid in the defense of the frontier. (from conversation with Nathan Boone, 3B133)

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    Created: 7/13/2017 8:08:26 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25223
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25223


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Draper reports that DB at Harrodsburg where he took a lot and built a cabin; but see Hammon on this.

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 8:09:14 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25224
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25224


1846

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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At the southeast portion of the Falls on the Ohio DB carved on a beech "D.Boone, 1774." (according to conversation with Col. Isaac Clark, near Louisville KY in 1846, who claimed to have seen the tree and inscription, 3B130

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 8:10:21 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25225
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25225


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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From a memorandum book kept by Capt. Daniel Smith: <Sept. 22d, Lieut. Boone, fourteen men, four days, three pounds of beef per day.> Suggests that he was leading scouting or spying parties. (3B138)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 8:11:20 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25226
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25226


1774

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Arthur Campbell to Col. Preston, 9/29/74: <Mr. Boone is very diligent at Castle's-woods and keeps up good order: I have reason to believe they have lately been remiss at Blackmore's and the spies there did not do their duty.> (Preston Papers, 3B143)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 8:13:27 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25227
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25227


1774

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Campbell to Preston[?], no date, but Draper says probably about 6/20/74: <The murder of Russell, Boone, and Drake's sons was in every one's mouth> and much of the blame was put on the Cherokees. (from Preston Papers, quoted in 3B144)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 8:14:08 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25228
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25228


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<Boone was most actively engaged during the whole contest, and had, in all situations, and under all circumstances, proved himself equal to the trust reposed in him.> (3B155)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 8:14:54 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25229
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25229


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Draper cites evidence "among Boone's Ms. Papers" [??] that in January 1775 he was hunting along the Kentucky river. (3B156)

File: 3B3.DR1



    Created: 7/13/2017 8:15:51 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25230
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25230


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<As early as 1764-'65, on his shorter trips, Boone began to take his oldest son James, then seven or eight years of age, with him, both for company, and early to initiate him into the facinating [sic] mysteries of the hunter's life. Spending several days in the woods together, they would sometimes be caught by a cold, snowy spell of weather, when Boone would have much difficulty in keeping little James warm during an inclement night, by hugging the little fellow closely to his bosom, in their open hunting camp. Though a blazing fire was always be kept up during the night, when the weather was such as to require it, yet it was often the case that while one side of a person would be uncomfortably warm, the other would be shivering or benumbed with cold. James Boone, as he grew up, continued to accompany his father on his hunts, and not unfrequently on such occasions, in the fall of the year, they would be absent two or three months, and return home laden with many of the richest spoils of the chase.> (citing notes of conversation with Nathan Boone) 2B126-27

File: 2B3.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 1:00:25 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25241
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25241


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Squire Boone Sr. died 1/2/1765 at his residence at Buffalo Lick, 69 yrs old. Buried in Joppa church yard, near Mocksville, Davie County, formerly part of Rowan County. This meeting house was "free to all religious demonimations. Squire Sr. was, according to Thomas Pearson, "who has carefully examined the records," "a respectable and orderly man, as he was appointed to perform services for the meeting several times, and no mention whatever of disorderly conduct." His widow lsurvived til 12776 or'77, when she died at her son-in-law, William Bryan's in the Bryan Settlement'; she was 70 years old. 2B126-127,127n

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    Created: 7/31/2017 1:02:07 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25242
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25242


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<Near Boone's in the Sugar Creek [sic] Settlement, lived a noted old hunter named Tate, who spent much of his time in the woods. Boone once returning from a hunting tour, went to his father-in-law's, Joseph Bryan's, to thrash out rye for his own use, and learning the wants of Tate's family in consequence of his protracted absence, obtained permission of Mr. Bryan also to trash out some gran for them. Such acts of charity were so common among the pioneers, as scarcely to excite notice. . . . On his way home with his own grain, Boone left at Tate's what he had designed [sic] for that needy family. Returning from the wilderness, Tate expressed his displeasure at Boone's generosity; and this coming to Boone's ears, and soon after meeting Tate, he gave him a severa flogging, and said he would do it again should he ever throw out any more jealous intimations; that he would be grateful to any person who, under similar circumstances, would befriend his family as he had attempted to befriend Tate's; but he could not brook the idea of real kindness being misconstrued in a manner so provokingly unkind. In his old age, Boone would sometimes allude to this instance of man's ingratitude.> (citing conversation with Mrs. Nathan Boone) 2B127-28

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    Created: 7/31/2017 1:09:30 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25243
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25243


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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End of summer 1765 Maj. John Field, William Hill, a man named Slaughter, and two others arrived at Boone's from Culpeper county, VA on their way to Florida to claim land under the new British program encouraging settlement with free grants. Old acquaintances, they stayed at Boones. Field had been to FL during the previous year, was now on his way back. <Who more likely to join him in such an enterprise than his old friend Boone, an ardent admirer of nature and a real lover of adventure? Long had Boone been meditating a removal to some region superior to the Yadkin Valley; and the great problem to be solved was, where could that more desirable region be found?> Accompanying them was Squire Boone, Jr., recently married, and not quite 21, and John Stuart, who had two years before married the younger sister of the Boone brothers. <Daniel Boone gave his good spouse a hearty smack, and ejaculated a sincere "God bless you!" at the same time, faithfully promising her, if it sould please Providence, that he would eat his Christman dinner with her and the children.> Field had been a captain on Forbes' campaign [did DB meet him at that time?], on the VA frontier, as a major of volunteers on Bouquet's expedition of 1764, and several years after would die in the battle of Point Pledasant. 2B130

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    Created: 7/31/2017 1:10:27 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25244
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25244


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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William Hill was a great "quiz" [sic] -- "the life and spirit of the whole company." In company he would <commence playing off his favorite antics and witticisms, and particularly if there were any young women in the family. He had a way peculiarly his own of snapping paper wads, bits of sticks, or kernels of corn, at the girls, constantly annoyuing them with his various exhibitions of roguery [sic]. Sometimes he encounter his equals among the frank and fearless girls of the Carolina and Georgia borders. At one place, while sitting at breakfast, with the horses saddled and fastened at the door, one oif the young girls, upon whom he had been playing his pranks, slipped out and unloosed his horse. Apprised of it, Hill ran out and caught the animal; and while he was absent, the mischievous girl snatched up his knife, thrust the blade for a new moments into the fire, and then carefully replaced it beside the plate. Hill presently returning and resuming his seat, attempted with him knife to cut some butter, which as quickly slid from the heated blade, when the girl rogusihly remarked, "Mr. Hill, somehow your knife seems ashamed of the butter." Suspecting the trick, he quietly laid the knife down, and as unconcernedly drew out his jack-knife, observing that he knew THAT never was ashamed of anything. On another occasion, eating out of a very dirty noggin, he sarcastically remarked to his hostess, that hers was a very fortunate noggin, as it had evidently excaped many a hard scouring.> 2B130-31

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    Created: 7/31/2017 1:11:37 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25245
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25245


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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At one point in the FL trip -- during which they encountered swamps, marshes, and were not particularly favorably impressed with the country -- Stuart got separated from the party, remained lost for a time, and almost starved. The whole party was once saved from hunger by a party of Seminole Indians. They gained the friendship of these Indians by exchanging gifts: <By a happy stroke of policy [sic], Squire Boone presented an Indian girl with a small shaving-glass, the only article he retained among his baggage that might be dispensed with. As she gazed upon it, there she saw mirrored her own face; all this was unaccountably mysterious to the simple Indian maiden. Eagerly did she first look upon one side, and then the other, to discover, if she could, the object of her delighted vision; and though she could not comprehend the singular representation of her own well-known features, from dress and trinketry, yet she was highly gratified with it. With extravagant delight she hastened to her mother with the precious gift, and in a few minutes the starving travelers were furnished with venison and honey in abundance, and treated with the most liberal hospitality that an itinerant camp of Indians could offer.> 2B132

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    Created: 7/31/2017 1:13:00 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25246
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25246


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<Slaughter, who was something of an adept in games of chance, won enough where they tarried of nights while journeying through the settled portions of their route, added to the few deer-skins secured by their skill, nearly to meet their entire expenses.> 2B134

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    Created: 7/31/2017 1:15:29 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25247
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25247


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<Boone could have reached home a few days before the promised time, but as he neared the Sugar Tree Settlement, he somewhat slackened his pace, so that at noon on Christmas-day he stode into hisdomiclie, gave his "little girl," as he familarily called his wife, and the children a greeting kiss, took his seat at the table, and joyfully partook with his family of the holiday repast which his good spouse had prepared for the occasion.> 2B134-35

File: 2B3.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 1:16:59 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25248
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25248


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<Mrs Boone was unwilling to remove to Pensacola [where DB had supposedly bought a town lot and house], so far distant from her relatives and friends; besides, from his own story, she was persuaded there was nothing in all Florida, with its interminable swamps, barren sand-hills, and scanty game, that should for a moment induce her good man to entertain the idea of moving there. He began to think so too, and the little town-lot in Pensacola was left to take care of itself; and henceforth Daniel Boone looked hopefully to the great Western Valley to find his long sought for ideal of a perfecdt country -- one possessed of a rich soil, salubrious climate, good timber, extensive range, and game in great variety and profusion.> (Florida trip information from Nathan Boone, Isaiah Boone, the three surviving sons of John Stuart's widow, Mrs Rebecca Boone Lemond [?], and Daniel Bryan) 2B135

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    Created: 7/31/2017 1:25:50 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25249
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25249


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Benjamin Cutbirth married Elizabeth Wilcoxen, a neice of DB. Cutbirth (born in Augusta county, VA, moving to Yadkin on his own to make his fortune) became a hunting companion of DB. <They ranged the forest far and wide, and not unfrequently met parties of Indian hunters, who expressed much dissatisfaction on account of their intrusions upon their hunting grounds, and killing so much of the game. On one of their excursions, when they had had a very successful hunt, and had dried and packed a large quantity of skins and furs, in their camp on Roane's Creek, a north-easterly tributary of the Watauga, rising in the mountains of East Tennessee, a party of Cherokee Indians came upon them, and robbed them of every thing they possessed. There was no help for this mishap, and they had to submit to it with the best grace they could.> Another time they succeeded in hunting a great quantity of bear meat, which they stored in a log-pen while they continued the hunt; but when they returned they found the meat all destroyed. The stream here was ever after known as Meat Camp Creek. 2B137-38

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    Created: 7/31/2017 1:27:00 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25250
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25250


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Cutbirth, with John Stuart, John Baker, and James Ward -- all excellent woodmen -- in 1765 left on a trip that took them to the Mississippi; they crossed the Appalachians, over Tennessee, and to the Mississippi; this may have been the first documented case of Anglo-Americans to accomplish this. They spent two years hunting, trapping, lumbering, trading their products down river in New Orleans. But they were robbed of their proceeds and left distitute. 2B139-40

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    Created: 7/31/2017 1:27:59 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25251
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25251


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<Two causes contributed to induce Boone to move westwardly -- the growing scarcity of game, and the oppresssive extortions of the clerks of courts, sheriffs, tax-gatherers, and lawyers of the province. Land agents would issue patents in behalf of Earl Granville, an extensive land-holder of that region, and afterwards pretend to have discovered a capital defect in the omission ofGranville's titles of honor; which alarming discovery but too often had its intended effect of inducing the people to secure their lands by taking out new patents, and paying their fees a second time. New frauds were constantly invented by these harpies. The deputy-surveyors, entry-takers, and other officers of inferior grade, readily caught the cue, and profited by the bad example of their superiors; and thus the most base-baced imporitions were everywhere practiced with perfect impunity. Goaded on almost to desperation by several years continuance of these malpractices, with their petitions to the proper authorities for redress of grievances rejected and their complaints treated with contumetious [sic] scorn, the people at length rose in bodies under name of the Regulators, but were defeated by Gov. Tryon and his forces near Great Alamance Creek, May 16, 1771. . . . Anxious alike to escape these oppressions, and locate in the midst of a better hunting region, Boone left the Sugar Tree Settlement and removed his family about sixty miles, in a north-westerly direction, towards the head of the Yadkin, and settled upon a fine tract of land upon its north-western bank, some two hundred yards back from the stream, and near the foot of the hills skirting the low grounds.> Three locations, the first near Holeman's Ford; the second some five miles higher up the river on the southeastern side; a third on the southern bank of the Yadkin itself. (Based on the memories of "an ancient woman, Mrs. Susanna Dulla, whose father William Ellison, lived on Beaver Creek when Boone resided there.) 2B146-47

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    Created: 7/31/2017 1:29:16 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25252
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25252


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Two methods: one required buring the woods and driving the game before; the other method, which Flint discusses, is called "shining the eyes." <But Boone did not practice either of these modes of fire-hunting. He had carefully studied the habits peculiar to deer, and found that in the Summer and early autumn they would nightly resort to the rivers and creeks, not for drink but to eat a tender water-moss, of which they were exceedingly fond, which grew plentifully in shoaly places, and also to avoid the flies and other swarming insects so common to all forest regions, and so annoying alike to wild and tame animals. If the stream was low or Shallow, the fire-carrier would wade, followed by the hunters either in the water or along the bank; but more generally, from the depth of the stream, and the almost impenetrable thickets of cane-brake along the shore, all would avail themselves of canoes, floating down the stream, the fire of pine-knots blazing on the stove-hearth in the prow, and allowing the stupid gave of the animals. Experienced hunters would make as successful shots at night as by the ordinary mode of day-hunting, having the shining of the deers'eyes for a mark, and the glaring light reflected from the sights of their rifles, to enable them to take unerring aim. It was only upon the Yadkin that Boone ever participated in this kind of hunting.> (citing conversations with Nathan Boone) 2B150-51

File: 2B3.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 1:36:07 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25253
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25253


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Hunt in the fall of 1767: William Hill, Squire Boone Jr., and DB. Crossed the Blue Ridge and Alleghanies, and the Holston and Clinch near their sources, to the head waters of the west Fork of Big Sandy. Followed it a hundred miles [?] until they came upon a salt lick, known later as Young's Salt Works, west of the town of Prestonburg. Caught in a severe snow storm, remained all winter. <Here it was that Boone saw the first buffaloes he ever beheld, and enjoyed many a delicious feast from the favorite rump of that animal, as a tender loin of venison.> (from conversation with Nathan Boone, who visited this site with his father in winter of 1796-97, where DB recounted this earlier visit) 2B152-53

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    Created: 7/31/2017 1:37:25 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25254
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25254


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<Boone and Hill had become very much attached to each other, and were often employed on hunting trips together. They entered into a solemn agreement that which ever of them should die first, should, if possible, return and convey to ehr survivor intelligence from the spirit world. Hill was the first to enter upon that untried state, but Boone used pleasantly to remark that the promised communications were never made. Hill must have died shortly after returning from this trip to Sandy, for had he been living when Boone entered upon his subsequent egreat exploration of Kentucky, it is natural to suppose he would have taken part in an enterprise so consonant with his tastes and feelings." 2B154

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    Created: 7/31/2017 1:39:54 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25255
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25255


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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1768: <When once alone, at a snowy time, near where Jonesboro now is, in East Tennessee, Boone laid himself down on a bed of boughts or cane, and convered his blanket over him. In this situation, and probably quite weary, he slept sweetly and soundly. A party of Cherokee Indians espying the solitary hunter, one of them crept up stealthily, andcarefully raising the snow-covered blanket, exclaimed, "Ah, Wide-Mouth, have I got you now?" Boone, of course, took things calmly, and expressed much pleasure at meeting his red brothers; and after a hearty shake of the hand all round, a general interchange of news and civilities followed. He was, on this occasion, either treated kindly and suffered to depart when and where he pleased, or, if partly retained in surveillance, he had no difficulty in soon giving his brothers the slip, and making a wide space, as speedly as possible between him and them.> (no citation) 2B157-58

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    Created: 7/31/2017 1:43:23 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25256
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25256


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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on his trip to KY in 1752, noted that Indians at that time referred to KY as the "Dark and Bloody Ground," or sometimes as the "Middle Ground" -- "where scenes of stife and carnage had long been familiar to the warlike sons of the forest." 2B171

File: 2B3.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 1:52:01 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25257
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25257


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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1769: <How Mrs. Boone acted on this occasion, we do not exactly know; perhaps she kindly intimated a doubt of the wisdom of such a tras-montain excursion, but her gentle nature would never had permitted her to throw any serious obstacles in the way. Let her good man and Findlay put in the spring crop, and Stuart, Holden, and Cooley theirs, and the women and children could keep down the weeds and bestir the soil, and Squire Boone could remain to aid all the respective families in gathering the harvest. Findlay and Mooney, it is believed, were alone unblessed with wife or home. Such seem to have been their plans and arrangements. Winter soon glided away, and cheerful spring with its busy scenes came on; the seed was quickly sown and planted, and the simple out-fit of the party speedily completed.> 2B173-74

File: 2B3.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 2:03:59 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25258
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25258


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<Each was equipped with a trusty rifle upon his shoulder; on his right side was his tomahawk with its handle thrust under the leathern belt that encircled his body, and on the left was suspended the hunting-knife in its sheath attached to the belt, and a powder-horn and bullet-pouch of ample dimensions. They were attired in the simple, convenient and beautiful hunting-shirt, or loose open frock, generally made of dressed deer-skins, with leggins or drawers of the same material fastened to the body belt, and tied around below the knee; and the usual deer-skin moccasins covered their feet. An uncouth fur cap generally completed the equipage, but Boone despised the article and always wore a hat. Each of the party was mounted upon a good horse, with a blanket or bear-skin fastened behind, together with a camp-kettle, a little stock of salt, and preadventure a small supply of provisions to last till the game region should be reached, when the wild woods alone would be relied on for subsistence alike for man and beast.> 2B174-75

File: 2B3.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 2:07:54 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25259
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25259


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<Preparing deer-skins for market was something of a labor. Both the hair, and the outer grain in which the hari takes root, were scraped off with a knife, as a currier dresses leather; and then, when dry, the skin was thoroughly rubbed across a staking-board until rendered quite soft and polant, thus stripping it of all unnecessary wieight, and fitting it for packing more compactly. This process, in hunter's parlance, was denominated GRAINING, and the skins were then pronounced HALF-DRESSED; and a horse, heavily laden, could carry something like a hundred half-dressed deer-skins, averaging two and a half pounds each, worth in market, at that day, about forty cents per pound.> <It was customary with boone and the hunters of his time, to place their half-dressed skins across poles, elevated several feet from the ground, with several layers upon each other, and a pole fastened on top, and still another on each side suspended by tugs, to keep the skins closely together, covered with elk or other out-spread skins, or peeled bark, to protect them from the weather. When enough of these skins were thus collected to form a pack, they were nicely folded and packed into a bale, two of which, one swung on either side, would constitute a horse-load. The packs, until sent off, were placed on scaffolds, protected from the weather; and were thus elevated, as were those on poles, so as to be beyond the reach of hungry bears and ravenous wolves, who will not fail to eat, tear, and destroy them, whenever an opportunity occurs.> 2B181-82

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    Created: 7/31/2017 2:08:38 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25260
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25260


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<No value was attached by hunters to buffalo, bear and elk skins, as they were too bulky to convey so great a distance to market and it is quite doubtful if they were then marketable at any price. They were, however, killed in their season for meat. Buffaloes were in the best order in the fall, after feeding upon wild grass, buffalo clover, and pea vines, and , to some extent also upon acorns, beechnuts and chestnuts; the clover, a kind with a large white blossom, lasting the entire growing season, but the pea vine only affording sustenance in the later part of summer and early autumn. The bear does not seem to lose flesh during his torpid state in winter, but coming out from his den in the spring, and greedily devouring young nettles and other tender herbs, seldom any grass, which acting as a cathartic, soon very much reduces him in flesh. During the early summer bears eat very little, and that chiefly worms and bugs, which they paw out of the ground, and scratch from decayed logs and trees, until berries and other wild fruits appear, and finally acorns, hazel, hickory, beech and chestnuts, when they fatten very repidly; and it is the quickness with which this flesh is acquired, that gives wild bear meat, in its appropriate season, so sweet and tender a taste, and renders it so incomparably superior to that of the tamed bear, as, in the later case, the animal is always kept in good order.> 2B182-83

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    Created: 7/31/2017 2:11:20 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25261
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25261


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<Elk meat was considered equal to venison, and was used for variety, or when buffalo, deer or bear could not be obtained. The hunters occasionally killed elks to convert their hides into tugs or straps, with which to pack their deer and other skins. Both elk and deer are fattest in the autumn, and subsist upon the same kinds of food as the buffalo. About Christmas, they all commence falling away in flesh, and become extremely poor in the latter part of winter and early spring, and sometime in May they begin to improve again. Wild turkies, which make such excellent meat in the fall, winter & spring, become very poor in summer, in consequence of wood-ticks, and scarcity of desirable food. A roasted buffalo marrow bone, or a choice cut from the buffalo hump, was esteemed most delicious eating. Beside these rich and tempting viands which successively formed the hunter's repast, berries, plums,grapes and nuts, towards the close of summer and during the autumn, added largely to the delicacies of the wilderness.> 2B183

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    Created: 7/31/2017 2:12:02 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25262
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25262


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<There were then no bees in Kentucky, and so our hunters could have had no wild honey; for bees generally keep pace with, and not much precede the advancing settlements. Hence originated the name of ENGLISH FLIES bestowed upon them by the Indians, who used to say to each other, when they saw a swarm of bees in the woods, "Well, brothers, it is time for us to decamp, for the white people are coming."> (Citing Nathan Boone, who added that there were no bees in the woods of MO "till the white settlements exspanded.") 2B183-84

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    Created: 7/31/2017 2:12:57 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25263
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25263


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Appointed one of two associate justices of the Superior Court of NC colony in 1767; in September 1770 driven from his court at Hillsborough by the Regulators. (3B164)

File: 3B4.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 2:15:20 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25264
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25264


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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"My brother, Richard Henderson, was induced to attempt the purchase of Kentucky from the Cherokees, through the suggestions and advice of the late Col. Daniel Boone, who then resided in Roawn county, North Carolina, and had hunted in and explored the country as early as 1768 or '69." (Maj. Pleasant Henderson, quoted in 3B165)

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    Created: 7/31/2017 2:16:28 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25265
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25265


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Thomas Hart, brother or Nathaniel and David Hart, an associate of Henderson and a player in the Transylvania company, stated that he "had known Boone of old, when poverty and distress held him fast by the hand; and, in those wretched circumstances, he had ever found him of a noble and generous soul, despising every thing mean." (Quoted in 3B165)

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    Created: 7/31/2017 2:18:30 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25266
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25266


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Dragging Canoe: spoke against selling the region to Henderson; they should retain it as a hunting ground; "they regarded the buffaloes and other game quite as beneficial to them as the tame cattle were to the whites." Overruled by those warriors dazzled by the sight of the trade goods, Dragging Canoe "informed Col. Henderson that the country below the Kentucky was the Bloody Ground, that a black cloud hung over it, and it would be found dark and difficult to settle; that the Northern and Western Indians were bad people, and when passing through Kentucky on their way to war against the Southern tribes, they would be apt to kill any of Henderson's settlers whom they might meet; but should Col. Henderson persist in making such settlement, the Cherokees would no longer hold him by the hand, nor could they be held responsible for any mishaps or evil consequences that might ensue." Draper notes later that this was essentially the same ominous warning that Attakullakula [Little Carpenter] had given DB, as quoted in Filson. (3B166-67,168)

File: 3B4.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 2:20:16 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25267
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25267


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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When Gov. Dunmore issued his Proclamation against the Henderson purchase he sent a copy and a message to the Cherokees. Col. Preston communicated the reply in a letter to the governor, 6/75: <The answer of the Cherokees, signed by the warriors present, and attested by the interpreter and some traders . . . [is] that those people have been deceived into a sale of lands they had no claim to. I had a letter from a considerable trader amongst these Indians who says that they were deluded into the treaty; that when the young men saw the goods they insisted on having them on any terms, which their great men were obliged to comply with, otherwise lose their authority in the nation, as they hold it on no other foundation than the love of the people, which a refusal would nave forfeited. Tho' he declare that they never, for the fourteen years he has been there, claimed any lands in that quarter farther than the waters that empty into their own river [the Tennessee]." (from the Preston Papers, quoted in 3B167[1])

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    Created: 7/31/2017 2:22:59 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25268
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25268


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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As early as 2/10/75 Governor Martin of NC had issued a proclamation against the legality of the purchase, alleging it to be a violation of the Proclamation of 1763 as well as contravening an act of the Provincial Assembly, and further declaring that the proposed sale of ammunition to the Cherokees was dangerous to the safety of the frontiers. It was further proclaimed that the company had issued advertisements inviting debtors, fugitives from justice, and other persons in desperate circumstances, to repair to the new grant of land, where assurances of asylum were held out. On 3/21 Gov. Dunmore issued a similiar proclamation against the "pretended purchase of one Richard Henderson, and other disorderly persons, his associates," who were commanded in his majesty's name forthwith to depart and relinquish the possession so unjustly obtained on pain of fine and imprisonment. (3B170)

File: 3B4.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 2:24:04 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25269
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25269


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Active in the treaty-making, beside Henderson were Thomas and Nathaniel Hart, John Williams, John Luttrell, and perhaps other partners of the company. In addition <a large number of frontier people attended the treaty . . ., among those present, beside Daniel Boone, were such prominent border men as James Robertson, John Sevier, Isaac Shelby, the Bledsoes, Richard Callaway, William Twitty, Nathaniel Henderson, William Cocke, and many others. All seemed delighted with the vigor and extent with which the company gave tpromise of prosecuting their enterprise, and not a little of this confidence resulted from the high character of the men composing the company. All were eager to learn upn what terms lands would be granted in the new Kentucky [sic] colony. This was promptly determined upon the spot, & proclaimed by the company at Watauga, that all such persons as would go out, settle the country, and raise a crop of corn that year, should have five hundred acres of land for five pounds sterling, clear of all charges, but it was, at the same time expressly stated, that they would not make grants at so low a rate to any who did not assist them in their first settlement.> (citing "Ms. depositions in the archives of Virginia," 3B169,171-72)

File: 3B4.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 2:26:54 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25270
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25270


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Col. Preston to Gov. Dunmore, 3/10/75: "At least five hundred people are preparing to go out this spring from Carolina, beside great numbers from Virginia, to settle Kentucky; and the company intend to have a treaty with the Wabash Indians, and give them a considerable present to permit the settlement on those lands. . . . Numbers have already removed, and are about to remove there this spring to plant corn, let the consequences be what they will. Upon the whole, my Lord, it appears to me, that the country will very shortly be inhabited by numbers of industrious people who cannot be prevented from going there." (Quoted 3B172)

File: 3B4.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 2:28:07 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25271
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25271


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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After the attack on the party, while recouping their losses at "Twitty's Fort, one night a rabid wolf crept among the sleeping men and bit James Nall on the forehead. The wolf was shot and killed and <the wound upon Nall's forehead soon healed, but in the fall of that year, while out fire-hunting on Clinch River in company with a brother-in-law, he was attacked with hydrophobia, when his brother-in-law had to jump out of the canoe. When the paroxysm was over and Nall taken home, he expressed fears that he might injure some of his friends, was tied, but ndid not survive the next fit." (citing conversations with Capt. John Gass, Col. Nathan Boone, and Col. Wm. Martin, 3B178-79)

File: 3B4.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 2:30:57 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25272
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25272


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<April the first, 1775. <Dear Colonel, <After my compliments to you, I shall acquaint you of our misfortune. On March the 25th, a party of Indians fired on my company about half an hour before day, and killed Mr. Twitty and his negro, and wounded Mr. Walker very deeply but I hope he will recover. On March the 28th, as we were hunting for provisions, we found Samuel Tate's son, who gave us an account that the Indians fired on their camp [Draper: "Perpahs on Tate's Creek, between Silver Creek and Boonesborough, and so named in consequence of this attack on Tate's camp upon its waters."] on the 27th day. My brother and I went down and found two men killed and SCULPED, Thomas McDowell and Jeremiah McFeeters. I have sent a man down to all the lower companies [Draper: "These companies were doubtless Harrod's at Harrodstown and Boiling Spring, the McAfees on Salt River, and perhaps McClelland's at the Royal Spring on Elkhorn, and Hinkson's on Licking.] in order to gather them all to the mouth of Otter Creek. My advice to you Sir, is, to come or send as soon as possible. Your company is desired greatly, for the people are very uneasy, but are willing to stay and venture their lives with you; and now is the time to FLUSTERATE their [the Indians?] intentions, and keep the country whilst we are in it. If we give way to them now, it will ever be the case. <This day we start from the battle ground, for the mouth of Otter Creek, where we shall immediately erect a fort, which will be done before you can come or send; then we can send ten men to meet you, if you send for them. <I am, Sir, your most obedient, <Daniel Boone. <N.B. -- We stood on the ground and guarded our baggage till day, and lost nothing. We have about fifteen miles to CANTUCK, at Otter Creek.> (Quoted in 3B179-80)

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    Created: 7/31/2017 2:32:13 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25273
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25273


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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"The whole party appear to have been carless -- had, probably, become callous to fear, and kept watch only the first night after their arrival. Perhaps the men had become weary of their labors and exposures, and Boone had little or no control over them." (3B184)

File: 3B4.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 2:33:12 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25274
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25274


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Letter of Henderson to his partners, 4/8/75, from Martin's Station: <Few enterprises of great consequence continue at all times to wear a favorable aspect; ours has met with the common fate, from the incautious proceedings of a few headstrong and unthinking people. On the 25th of March last, the Indians fired upon a small party of men, in camp, near the Louisa [Kentucky], killed two and put four others to the rout; and on the 27th did likewise on Daniel Boone's camp [sic], and killed a white man and negro on the spot, but the survivors maintained their ground and saved their baggage. But for a more particular account I refer you to Mr. Boone's original letter on that occasion, which came to hand last night. You scarcely need information that these accidents have a bad effect with respect to us.> <You observe from Mr. Boone's letter the absolute necessity of our not losing one omoment, therefore don't be surprised at not receiving a particular account of our journey with the several little misfortunes and cross accidents, which have caused us to be delayed so that we are still one hundred and thirty or one hundred and forty miles from our journey's end. We are all in high spirits, and on thorns [sic] to fly to Boone's assistance, and join him in defence of so fine and valuable a country. My only motives for stopping are, first, that you should shold receive a just representation of the affair, and secondly, to request you immediate assistance; for want of workmen our wagons and laid aside at Captain Martins in this valley, the chief of our salt and all our saltpetre and brimstone are left behind.> (quoted in 3B185-86)

File: 3B4.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 2:35:31 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25275
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25275


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Letter to partners from BOONESBOROUGH, 6/12/75 [reprinted in Hall, SKETCHES OF THE WEST] 1: <No doubt but you have felt great anziety since the receipt of my letter from Powell's Valley. At that time things wore a gloomy aspect; indeed it was a serious matter, and became a little more so after the date of the letter than before. That afternoon I wrote the letter in Powell's Valley, in our march this way, we met about forty people returning, and in about four days the number was little short of one hundred. Arguments and persuasions were needless; they seemed resolved on returning and travelled with a precipitation that truly bespoke their rears. Eight or ten were all that we could prevail on to proceed with us, or to follow after; and thus, what we before had, counting every boy and lad, amounted at about forty, with which number we pursued our journey with the utmost diligence -- for my own part, never under more real anxiety. Every person, almost, that we met, seemed to be at pains to aggravate the danger of proceeding; and had we given them all a fair hearing, I believe they would, in return for the favour, have gotten all our men. Many seemed to be of opinion (who had been with Boone) that the men assembled at the mouth of Otter Creek, would get impatient and leave him before we could possibly get there, if no other accident befel them; and, with me, it was beyond a doubt, that our right, in effect, depended on Boone's maintaining his ground -- at least until we could get to him. Here, gentlemen, your imagination must take the burden off my hands, and paint what I am unable to describe. You need not be afraid of giving scope to your fancy; it is impossible to make the picture worse than the original. Every group of travellers we saw, or strange bells which were heard in front, was a fresh alarm; afraid to look or inquire, lest Captain Boone or his company was amongst them, or some disastrous account of their defeat. The slow progress we made with our packs, rendered it absolutely necessary for some person to go on and give assurance of our coming, especially as they had no certainty of our being on the road at all; or had even heard whether the Indians had sold to us or not. [Implies that DB left the Sycamore Shoals treaty ground before the conclusion; see SYCAMORESHOALS] It was owing to Boone's confidence in us, and the people's in him, that a stand was ever attempted in order to wait for our coming.> (3B187-88, continued)

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    Created: 7/31/2017 2:36:35 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25276
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25276


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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2: (continued) <[no new paragraph] The case was exceedingly distressing: we had not a fellow that we could send on a forlorn hope in our shole camp: all our young men had sufficient employ with the pack-horses; and, the truth is, very few would have gone, if they had been totally idle. Distress generally has something in store when it is least expected; it was actually the case with us. Mr. William Cocke, (with whom some of you are acquainted) observing our anxiety on that account, generously offered to undertake the journey himself, and deliver a letter to Captain Boone, with all the expedition in his power. This offer, extraordinary as it was, we could by nomeans refuse -- it was not a time for much delicacy; a little compliment and a few sincere thanks, instantly given, preceded a solemn engagement to set off next morning; and if he excaped with his life, to perform the trust> (3B188-89) (continued)

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    Created: 7/31/2017 2:42:22 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25277
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25277


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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3: <The day proved dark and rainy; and I own, Mr. Cocke's undertaking appeared a little more dangerous than the evening before -- in spite of affectation, it was plain he thought so -- whether it was from the gloominess of the weather, or the time of setting off being actually come, or what, I cannot tell; but perhaps a little of both. Indeed I rather suspect there is some little secondary mischievous passion, personating courage, hankering about the heart of man, that very often plays him a double game, by causing him to view dangers at a little distance, through the wrong end of the glass; and as soon as cool deliberation, by the help of caution, has shifted the telescope, and brought the object home to a nearer view, and perhaps the dangerous features a little magnified, this monkey passion most shamefully deserts, and leaves the affair to be managed as it can. Be that as it may, in these cases we are not always without a friend. PRIDE will, if possible take up the cudgels; and let the world say what it will of her, she answers the end of genuine innate courage, (if there be such a thing), and for aught I know, it is the thing itself.> (3B189) (continued)

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    Created: 7/31/2017 2:43:47 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25278
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25278


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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4: <But to return to our subject. No time was lost; we struck whilst the iron was hot, fixed Mr. Cocke off with a good Queen Ann's musket, plenty of amunition [sic], a tomahawk, a large cuttoe knife, a Cutch blanket, and no small quantity of jerked beef. Thus equipped, and mounted on a tolerably good horse, on the 10th day of April, Mr. Cocke started from Cumberland River, about one hundred and thirty miles from this place, and carried with him, besides his own enormous load of fearful apprehensions, a considerable burden of my own uneasiness. The probability of giving Mr. Boone and his men word of our being near them, administered great pleasure, and we made the best of our time, following on.> (3B190) (continued)

File: 3B4.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 2:44:10 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25279
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25279


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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5: <The general panic that had seized the men we were continually meeting, was contagious; it ran like wild-fire; and, notwithstanding every effort against its progress, it was presently discovered in our own camp; some hesitated and stole back, privately; others saw the necessity of returning to convince their friends that they were still alive, in too strong a light to be resisted; whilst many, in truth, who have nothing to thank but the fear of shame, for the credit of intrepidity, came on; though their hearts, for some hours, made part of the deserting company. In this situation of affairs, some few, of genuine courage and undaunted resolution, served to inspire the rest; by help of whose example, assisted by a little pride and some ostentation, we made a shift to march on with all the appearance of gallantry, and, cavalier-like, treated every insinuation of danger with the utmost contempt. It soon became habitual; and those who started in the morning, with pale faces and apparent trepidation, could lie down and sleep at night in great quiet, not even possessed of fear enough to get the better of indolence. There is a mistaken notion amongst the vulgar, with respect to courage, which cannot be eradicated but by dint of experiment; all watching, when it comes to be put in practice, has to them the appearance of cowardice; and that it is beneath a soldier to be afraid of any thing, especially when a little fatigued. They would all agree in the morning, that it would be highly prudent, and necessary to keep sentinels around our camp at night; but a hearty meal or supper, (when we could get it) and good fires, never failed putting off the danger for at least twenty-four hours; at which time it was universally agreed, on all hands, that a watch at night would be indispensably necessary. Human nature is eternally the same; a deathbed repentance and a surprised camp are so nearly assimilated, that you may safely swear they arise from the same cause. Without further speculation, we have been so fortunate, hitherto, as to excape both. I wish from my soul, that they may not be in league to come together. Never was fairer opportunity, as to the one, and you may form a tolerable judgment as to the other; the western waters having, as yet, produced no visible alteration with respect to morals or Christian charity amongst us.> (3B190-91) (continued)

File: 3B4.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 2:45:02 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25280
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25280


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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6: <Here I must beg the favor of your turning back with me to Powell's Valley. OUr anxiety at that time is now of very little concern to you; but the impressions still remain on my mind, and indeed I would not wish to get clear of them in a little time. It learnt me to make an estimate of the probably value of our country; to see the imminent danger of losing it forever, and presented me with a full view of the ridiculous figure we should cut in the world, in case of failure. With respect to the real consequence of such a disappointment, I could not so well judge for the company in general, as for myself, but thought it too serious an affair with respect to us all, to be timely given up without the fire of a single gun, or something like an attempt to take possession and defend our rights, so long, at least, as we should find our posts tenable.> (3B192-93) (continued)

File: 3B4.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 2:45:24 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25281
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25281


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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7: <Though the danger Mr. Cocke exposed himself to in rendering this piece of service to the company, dwelt on me for some time, yet having despatched a messenger to Captain Boone was a matter of such consolation, that my burthen from that time was much lightened. We soon found, by his letters on the road that he had a companion, and went on very well -- with a small stoppage by waters excepted. On Thursday, the 20th April, [we] found him with Captain Boone and his men at the place appointed, where he had related the history of his adventures, and come in for his share of applause; here it was that the whole load, as it were, dropped off my shoulders at once, and I questioned if a happier creature was to be found under the sun. Why do I confine it to myself; it was general; the people in the fort, as well as ourselves, down to an old weather-beated negro, seemed equally to enjoy it. Indeed it was natural for us, after being one whole month without intermission, travelling in a barren desert country, most of the way our horses packed beyond their strength; no part of the road tolerable, most of it either hilly, stony, slippery, miry, or bushy; our people jaded out and dispirited with fatigue, and what was worse, often pinched for victuals. To get clear of all this at once, was as much as we could well bear; and though we had nothing here to refresh ourselves with but cold water and lean buffalo beef, without bread, it certainly was the most joyous banquet I ever saw. Joy and festivity was in every countenance, and that vile strumpet, Envy, I believe, had not found her way into the country.> (3B193-94) (concluded)

File: 3B4.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 2:45:57 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25282
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25282


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Capt. William Cocke on his service as a forward messenger for RHENDERSON: <We were notified that he, Daniel Boone, had prevailed on fifteen men to assist him in erecting some small huts for defence, and then would make a stand if possible; but he should confide in our giving him assistance. Feeling as I did for the brave and distressed, I proposed that if any one would venture with me, that I would go on to join Boone to spirit up the brave men with him, and assure them of the general determination to join them with about thirty who were then with Col. Henderson. But no person could be prevailed on to go with me, or to encounter so dangerous an undertaking. I then consented to go alone." (Quoted in 3B189[1]n)

File: 3B4.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 2:47:13 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25283
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25283


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Draper on DB's presence at the treaty-making: <This intimation [in Henderson's letter from Boonesborough] that Boone left before the conclusion of the treaty, does not seem to correspond with Boone's Narrative [Filson], and particularly towards its close where Boone introcudes the remark of the old Cherokee chief to himself when signing and delivering the deed. The statement of the late Daniely Bryan, the late Col. Nathan Hart of Ky, whose father was at the treaty, the late Maj. Pleasant Henderson, a brother of Col. Richard Henderson, and of the present Col. Nathan Boone, all go to confirm the opinion that Boone was not only at the treaty, but aided in fixing the boundaries of the purchase. As Henderson's letter, from which we quite, was written nearly three months after the treaty, he may have thoughtlessly said what was not, in this particular, strictly correct; and he may only have intended to say, that though Boone left the treaty-ground after the conclusion of the purchase, yet perhaps before the grand entertainment, and final departure of the Indians. The deeds were signed on the 17th of March, & Henderson did not leave till the 20th, when, as he records it "having finished the treaty at Watauga, set off for Louisa." Boone could not have started before the signing of the deeds on the 17th; and it would hardly be supposed, that Henderson would have sent forward Boone and his party of pioneers to mark the road and commence the settlement before a certainty of obtaining the grant. It is, moreover, certain that Capt. Twitty, Felix Walker and their companions remained till the conclusion of the treaty, and overtook Boone, who had preceded them a little, at the Long Island of Holston, some thirty miles from the treaty-ground; and the fact that this party was with Boone, is another evidence of the thoughtlessness of Henderson in penning the remark upon which we here comment.> (3B188[1]n)

File: 3B4.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 2:48:13 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25284
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25284


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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"During the last day's session of the Convention, May the 27th, President Henderson sent in a message, desiring to exhibit the title deed from the Aborigines and first owners of the soil of Transylvania, and requesting that the boundaries of the same might be entered upon their record. This request being complied with, Col. Henderson personally attended the Convention, with John Farrar, who having been specially appointed by the Cherokees, at the Watauga treaty, for that purpose, now, in their name, performed the ancient, but now obsolete custom of LIVERY OF SEIZIN; and thus, in the presence of the Convention, made a formal transfer of the country to the Transylvania Company. Col. Henderson then produced the deed, the metes and bounds of which were entered on the journal." (4B9)

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 3:31:27 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25296
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25296


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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compact 1: The <compact between the proprietors and the people of the colony,, declaring "the powers of the one, and the liberties of the other," was entered into, signed ans easled, by Henderson, Hart and Luttrell, on the part of the company, and by Col. Thomas Slaughter, chairman of the Convention, in behalf of the colonists. This interesting Compact, alike so creditable to the knowledge of republican government possessed by our backwoods legislators, and to the liberal principles which actuated the proprietors [sic!], deserves a place in this connection: <"Whereas, it is highly necessary for the peace of the proprietors, and the security of the people of this colony, that the powers of the one, and the liberties of the other, be ascertained, -- We, Richard Henderson, Nathaniel Hart and J. Luttrell, on behalf of ourselves, as well as the other proprietors of the colony of Transylvania, of the one part, and the representative of the people of the said colony, in Convention assembled, of the other part, do most solemnly enter into the following contract and agreement, to wit: <1st. That the election of delegates in this colony be annual. <2d. That the Convention may adjourn, and meet again on their own adjournment -- provided, that in cases of great emergency, the proprietors may call together the delegates before the time adjourned to; and, if a majority do not attend, they may dissolve them and call a new one. <3d. That, to prevent dissention and delay of business, one proprietor shall act for the whole, or some one delegated by them for that purpose, who shall always reside in the colony. <4th. That there be perfect religious freedom and general toleration -- provided, that the propagators of any doctrine or tenets, evidently tending to the subversion of our laws, shall, for such conduct, be amenable to, and punished by, the civil courts. <5th. That the judges of the Superior or Supreme courts be appointed by the proprietors, but be supported by the people, and to them be answerable for their mal-conduct. <6th. That quit-rents never exceed two shillings sterling per hundred acres. <7th. That the proprietors appoint a sheriff, who shall be one of three persons recommended by the court. <8th. That the judges of the superior courts have, without fee or reward, the appointment of the clerks of this colony. <9th. That the judges of the intferior courts be recommended by the people, and approved by the proprietors, and by them commissioned. <10th. That all civil and military officers be within the appointment of the proprietors. <11th. That the office of Surveyor General belong to no person interested, or a partner in this purchase. <12th. That the legislative authority, after the strength and maturity of the colony will permit, consist of three branches, to wit: the delegates or representative chosen by the people; a council, not exceeding twelve men, possessed of landed estate, residing in the colony, and the proprietors.> (4B12, citing the journal as printed in Butler, HISTORY OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY, appendix; Hall, SKETCHES OF HISTORY) continued

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 3:32:31 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25297
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25297


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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compact 2A: <13th. That nothing with respect to the number of delegates from any town or settlement shall hereafter be drawn into precedent, but that the number of representatives shall be ascertained by law, when the state of the colony will admit of amendment. <14th. That the law officers be always open. <15th. That commissions without profit, be granted without fee. <16th. That the salaries of all officers appointed by the proprietors, be settled and regulated by the laws.> (4B12, citing the journal as printed in Butler, HISTORY OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY, appendix; Hall, SKETCHES OF HISTORY) continued

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 3:33:32 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25298
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25298


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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compact 2B: <17th. That the Convention have the sole power of raising and appropriating all public moneys, and electing their treasurer. <18th. That, for a short time, till the state of the colony will permit to fix some place of holding the Convention which slall be permanent, the place of meeting whall be agreed on by the proprietors and the Convention. <To the faithful, and religious, and perpetual observance of all and every of the above articles, the said proprietors, on behalf of themselves as well as those absent, and the chairman of the Convention on behalf of them and their constituents, have hereunto interchangeably set their hands and affixed their seals, the twenty seventh day of May, one thousand seven hundred and seventy five."> (4B12, citing the journal as printed in Butler, HISTORY OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY, appendix; Hall, SKETCHES OF HISTORY)

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 3:33:59 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25299
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25299


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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The records of proceedings "prove that the pioneers were very far from being a lawless band; order was heaven's first law with them, and they were even anxious to make and enforce laws for the preservation of the game and range of the country. Boone was fully sensible of the necessity of these legal regulations, and gave his efficient influence in procuring their enactment." (4B12[1])

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 3:35:30 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25300
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25300


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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RHENDERSON to proprietors in NC, BOONESBOROUGH, 6/12/75-1: <It will, no doubt surprise you, but it is nevertheless true, that we are in no posture of defence [sic] or security at this time; and, for my own part, do not much expect it will ever be effected, unless the Indians should do us the favor of annoying us, and regularly scalping a man every week until it is permformed; if the intervals should be longer, the same spirit of indolence and self-security, which hadth hitherto prevailed, would not only continue, but increase. To give you a small specimen of the disposition of the people, it may be sufficient to assure you, that when we arrived at this place, we found Captain Boone's men as inaattentive on the score of fear, (to all appearances), as if they had been in Hilslborough. A small fort only wanted two or three days' work to make it tolerably safe, was totally neglected on Mr. Cocke's arrival; and unto this day remains unfinished, notwithstanding the repeated applications of Captain Boone, and every representation of danger from ourselves. The death of poor Twitty and the rest, who at the time you were informed, because sacrifices to indiscretion, had no more effect than to produce one night's watching after they got to Otter Creek, not more than ten days after the massacre. Our plantations extend near two miles in length, on the river and up a creek. Here people work in their different lots, some without their guns, and others without care or caution. It is in vain for us to say any thing more about the matter; it cannot be done by words. We have a militia law, on which I have some dependence; if it has no good effect, we must remain for some time much at the mercy of the Indians. Should any successful attack be made on us, Captain Hart, I suppose, will be able to render sufficient reasons to the surviving company, for withdrawing from our camp, and refusing to join in building a fort for our mutual defence.> (4B16, continued)

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 3:36:26 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25301
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25301


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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6/12/75-2: <This representation of our unguarded and defenceless situation is not all that seems to make against us. Our men, under various pretences, are every day leaving us. It is needless to say any thing against it; many of them are so much determined, that they sell their rights for saving land on our present terms, to others who remain in their stead, for little or nothing; nay, some of them are resolved to go, and some are already gone, and given up all pretensions for this season, and depend on getting land on the next fall's terms. Our company has dwindled from about eighty in number to about fifty odd, and I believe in a few days will be considerably less. Amongst these I have not heard one person dissatisfied with the country or terms, but go, as they say, merely because their business will not admit of longer delay. The fact is, that many of them are single, worthless fellows, and want to get on the other side of the mountains, for the sake of saying they have been out and returned safe, together with the probabilityof getting a mouthful of bread in exchange for their news.> (4B16-17, continued)

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 3:38:05 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25302
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25302


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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6/12/75-3: <Having given you a slight view of one side of the quenstion, it may not be amiss to turn the subject over, and see what may be said on the other hand. Notwithstanding all our negligence, self-security, scarcity of men, and whatever else may be added against us, I cannot think but we shall carry the matter through, and be crowned with success. My reasons for this opinion, call for in you, a kind of knowledge of the geography of our country. Those who have no idea of this matter may be aided by Captain Hart. We are seated at the mouth of Otter Creek, on the Kentucky, about 150 miles from the Ohio. To the west, about 50 miles from us, are two settlements [Harrodsburg and Boiling Springs], within six or seven miles one of the other. There were, some time ago, about 100 at the two places; though now, perhaps, not more than 60 or 70, as many of them are gone up the Ohio for their families, &c.; and some returned by the way we came, to Virginia and elsewhere. These men, in the course of hunting provisions, lands, &c., are some of them constantly out, and scour the woods from the banks of the river near forty or fifty miles southward. On the opposite side of the river, and north from us, about forty miles, is a settlement [Capt. John Hinkson's settlement, later known as Ruddell's Station] on the crown lands, of about nineteen persons; and lower down, towards the Ohio, on the same side, there are some other settlers [probably Willis Lee's settlement on the KY, about a mile below the present town of Frankfort], how many, or ar what place, I can't exactly learn. There is also a party [under the leadership of Capt. Thomas Gist] of about ten or twelve, with a surveyor, who is employed in searching through that country, and laying off officers' lands; they have been more than three weeks within ten miles of us, and will be several weeks longer ranging up and down that country.> (4B17-18, continued)

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 3:40:16 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25303
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25303


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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6/12/75-4: <Now, taking it for granted, that the Cherokees are our friends, which I most firmly believe, our situation exempts us from the first attempt or attack of any other Indians. Colonel Harrod, who governs the two first mentioned settlements, (and is a very good man for our purpose), Colonel Floyd, (the surveyor,) and myself, are under solemn engagements to communicate, with the utmost despatch, every piece of intelligence respecting danger or sign of Indians, to each other. In case of invasion of Indians, both the other parties are instantly to march and relieve the distressed, if possible. Add to this, that our country is so fertile, the growth of grass and herbage so tender and luxuriant, that it is almost impossible for a man or dog to travel, without leaving such sign that you might, for many days gallop a horse on the trail. To be serious, it is impossible for any number of people to pass through the woods without being tracked, and of course discovered, if Indians, for our hunters all go on horseback, and could not be deceived if they were to come on the trace of footmen. From these circumstances, I think myself in a great measure secure against a formidable attack; and a few skulkers could only kill one or two, which would not much affect the interest of the company.> (4B18-19, continued)

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 3:40:39 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25304
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25304


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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6/12/75-5: <Thus, gentlement, you have heard both sides of the question, and can pretty well judge of the degree of danger we are in. Let your opinions be as they may on this point, by no means betray the least symptom of doubt to your most imtimate friends. If help is ever wanting, it will be long before succor can come from you, and therefore every expense of that kind is superfluous and unnecessary. If we can maintain our ground until after harvest, in Virginia, I will undertake forever after to defend the country against every nation of red people in the world, without calling on the company for even a gun-flint.> (4B19, continued)

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 3:41:39 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25305
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25305


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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6/12/75-6: <With respect to the country, Mr. Hart, who brings this, will give you ample satisfaction. All that I shall say about it is, that it far exceeds the idea which I had formed of it; and indeed it is not surprising, for it is not in the power of any person living to do justice to the fertility of the soil, beauty of the country, or excellence of its range; let it suffice, that we have got a country of good land, with numberless advantages and inducements to a speedy population; that this country is large enough, and surely will be settled immediately on some principles or other: the grand affair on our part, is to manage matters so as to have our rights acknowledged, and continue lords of the soil. Every thing has succeeded to my wish with respect to title. The torrent from Virginia appears to be over, and gentlemen of considerable fortune, from thence, are some of theim come, and others coming, with design to purchase under us, as they cannot come within the indulgences to adventurers of this season; and applications are daily making for the next year's price. Many of them are returned home, and wouldhave been much dissatisfied, if I had not promised them, on my word and honor, that the terms should be published in all the Williamsburg papers.> (4B19-20, concluded)

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 4:49:24 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25306
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25306


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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"The country north and east of the Kentucky was denominated the CROWN LANDS because the Indian TITLE had been extinguished -- at Fort Stanwix treaty, in 1768, by the Six Nations; and by the Cherokees, at the treaty of Lockaber [sic], in 1770, and by agreement with Col. John Donelson in 1771; and thus that region became the property of the Crown." (4B22n)

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 4:50:21 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25307
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25307


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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A particularly notable example of the indomitable urge to mark the woods with their grafatti: In the Green River country, north bank of Big Barren River, about three miles from Bowling Green, a quarter mile above Van Meter's Ferry, are three beech trees marking one of the camping grounds of a surveying and exploring party from Harrodsburg. One beech had "handsomely cut" upon its north bark the names of 13 persons, from nine extending down to four feet from the ground, to wit, in order from top to bottom: "J. Neavell, E. Bulger, I. Hite, V. Harman, J. Jackman, W. Buchanan, A. Bowman, J. Drake, N. Nall, H. Skaggs, J. Bowman, Tho. Slaughter, J. Todd. 1775, June Th 13." The second beech marked: "Wm Buchanan, June 14th, 1775," and "J. Todd, June 17th, 1775." A third marked: "J. Drake, Isaac Hite, 15th June, 1775," and above that the additional date "June 23, 1775." (4B24n)

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 4:51:33 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25308
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25308


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Extract from letter of Capt. Russell writing after a four day conversation with Cornstalk of the Shawnees (date unclear, 1775?): <discovered that it was the intention of the Pick tribe of Indians [Miamis?] to be troublesome to our new settlements, whenever they can; and he further assured me, that the Mingoes behave in a very unbecoming manner, frequently upbraiding the Shawanoes in cowardly making the peace [Treaty of Camp Charlotte, between Dunmore and the Shawnees, fall 1774] and call them Big Knife people, -- so that Cornstalk cannot well account for their intentions. If this be true, and a rupture between England and America has really commenced, we shall certainly receive trouble at the hands of those people in a short time, as they got the news of the battles [Lexington and Concord] in the Shawanoe towns eight or ten days before the Cornstalk came here.> (citing Preston Papers, 4B27)

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 4:52:48 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25309
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25309


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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RHENDERSON and Luttrell to proprietors in NC, [BOONESBOROUGH ?], 7/18/75-1: <We are informed that a party of Indians (not more than five or six) fired on four men at camp down the [Powell's] Valley, about twenty five miles below Capt. Joseph Martin's house, wounded two men, but were repulsed. This was on the 23rd of June, in the afternood. The next morning they were pursed by five white men, who, in a short distance, found one dead, and think there were more wounded, by the quantity of blood they discovered on the ground. <This affair has a good deal alarmed the people there, and caused them to build a fort at Capt. Martin's and work in companies. We wish that this may not be the beginning of a very troublesome affair, as well as an immediate prejudice to us. You know it is right in the way, and such reports are very terrifying to pusilanimous travelers; and I believe there are as many of that sort as any: though Tristan Shandy, for what reason I know not, omitted them in his catalogue. This is not all that we apprehend may be the conseqence. We are much afraid that there is not a just representation of the matter, and that our people were the aggressors. These are only aprehensions of our own, and most surely we wish our apprehensions may be groundless.> (4B25, continued)

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 4:54:54 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25310
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25310


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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7/18/75-2: <To give you a first notion of the matter, we are under the necessity of beginning our story again. You must know, the particulars were not communicated to us by Capt. Martin, but from Capt. Cocke, who was on his way from this place to Virginia, and was at that time in the Valley. In short, they both wrote, and both about Indians; but to distinguish the one account from the other, so as to make you understand what we mean, we find it indispensably necessary to quote each man's intelligence; and then, by throwint in a few anecdotes, and some of our own opinions, leave you to work the matter as you can. Don't be surprised that Capt. Martin gave no account of this in his letter; it was written the 22d June, a day before the engagement, and the bearer, (a little crazy creature,) came away afterwards, without Martin's knowledge.> (4B28-29, continued)

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:02:26 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25311
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25311


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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7/18/75-3: <After some other things of no consequence, Capt Martin says: "Six of the Northern Indians have undoubtedly been with the Cherokees, in order to get them to join with them against the white people; but the Cherokees refused. Dunmore and Col. Byrd have sent two expresses to the Cherokees, to your prejudice; one to get the Cherokees to meet the Six nations of Indians, and hold a treaty concerning the boundary -- they make no doubt that the Cherokees will give up all the land north of Cumberland; the other to get the Cherokees to be off the bargain with you, at any rate, and they will get properly authorised from his Majesty, and purchase the same of them, and give more, running at the same time the risk of displeasing his Majesty."> (4B29-30, continued)

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:03:14 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25312
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25312


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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7/18/75-4: <"There have been," continues Capt. Martin, "eleven Indians in the Valley. They seemed much alarmed when they found it settled below Cumberland Gap. They immediately returned home, after promising to come up to one of te cabins to get some bread, tec. The white people went to see them a second time -- found they had taken their back tracks. They followed them several miles; found they had gone on as fast as possible towards the Cherokee Nation; which promises something not very agreeable. I dread the consequences, as there will not be, for three weeks, more than seven or eight in the Valley, but I am determined to brave it out; have had thoughts, several times, of going to the Nation, only don't know how you would approve of it. I am very happy in settling the Valley. There are seventy-two tytheables [sic] making corn, but are chiefly obliged to go home, some to move their families, some to get provisions, and some for amunition [sic]. We are in great distress for powder; several people will be obliged to break up shortly for want of it, being out of powder to supply them."> (4B30, continued)

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:03:48 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25313
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25313


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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7/18/75-5: <Capt. Cocke's intelligence, June 25th, 1775: "On the 23d instant, a party of Indians fired on Mr. Davis' camp, which consisted of four men. They shot Mr. Shoemaker through the head, who fell, but instantly rose to his feet again and shot an Indian. They also wounded Mr. Davis with a spear, though but slightly. The men fought with the utmost bravery, and kept their camp. A boy got off, and ran about two miles to Mr. Newell's where I was; and in a few moments the men came themselves. Our party was then eight; and, as it was then night, and Mr. newell had his wife with him, we judged it impracticable to follow the Indians till morning. In the morning we concluded to leave three men with Mrs. Newell, and five of us to follow the Indians, whose number was judged to be five or six. When we came to the battle ground, we saw a great quantity of blood; followed until we found one dead, which I scalped. It is judged to be a Cherokee, and it is expected that more got wounded in the attack. One left his gun and spear in the time of the battle, and we got a tomahawk, scalping knife, powder-horn, shot-bag, and spear."> (4B30-31, continued)

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:04:13 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25314
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25314


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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7/18/75-6: <"The next day the people in the Valley seemed animated with success. Capt. Martin takes particular care to spirit up the people, and by his example every one seems inspired with fresh courage. This morning they were unanimously joined in a resolve to stand by and support each other, and build a fort at Capt. Martin's for the reception of their families. The Indians, if Cherokees, will, I judge, endeavor to screen themselves from fault, by laying the blame on the whites. I think it prodent to acquaint the heads of the Nation with a just state of the affair. Some days before the attack, seven or eight of the white people came on a camp of Indians, whose number was eleven -- six fellows, and the rest wenches and children. The whites discovered them first; rode up to them; the Indians seemed very friendly, told them they were Cherokees, and complained of their want of powder. The whites gave them powder, and they parted friendly, with a promise to go to the white people's camp; but they never went, unless it was that party that made the attack."> (4B31-32, continued)

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:04:36 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25315
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25315


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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7/18/75-7: <This, sirs, is the whole account respecting that affair from Powell's Valley; which, when we come to consider, we are far from being satisfied with in many respects. To us it seems improbably that five or six Indians should have the advantage of the onset against four men only, and be put to the route in the manner described -- not only to fail killing, but to be so much disconcerted as to drop a spear on the spot, and run away in confusion; and when one of their company died of his wounds, to take no steps to carry off or secret his body -- a circumstance they seldom fail attempting, at theutmost hazard of their lives. <There is but too much reason to doubt, that Mr. Cocke's apprehensions were not without foundation -- that the Indians would strive to fix the blame on the whites. He was on the spot, as it were, and we don't doubt but he might hear from the guilty expressions of the same kind, or we don't think such a thought would have entered his head. And what is more, it is most probable it was some of the Indians they gave an account of having seen before; and no man in his senses would believe their intentions hostile against the whites, or any others, when they were clogged in the manner they represent, with their wives and children, and subject to be overtaken with the greatest ease.> (4B32-33, continued)

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:04:59 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25316
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25316


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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7/18/75-8: <Those Indians were acquainted, that twenty or thirty men belonging to those white people's camps and those adjacent, and would not think of destroying the four [of] them present without being immediately pursued. The presumption is strong, that they came in consequence of the friendly inviataion they had and that the four white men perfidiously fell on them, and perhaps have murdered several, while the survivors will give but a poor account of our friendship and humanity to their nation. <Another circumstance which much inclines me to this opinion, is, that it was done in day-light. Few instances can be produced where Indians have premeditatedly entered on an engagement, when numbers were nearly equal, without the advantage of an ambuscade, or beginning their asault in the dark. What is more, they were Cherokees, undoubtedly; and, if they had succeeded, dare not avow the act in their own nation. And if it was plunder they wanted, the woods were full of houses, and therin they might have succeeded without involving their lives in mutual danger.> (4B33-34, continued)

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:05:33 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25317
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25317


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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7/18/75-9: <Upon the whole we shall be agreeably undeceived, if it should turn out otherwise, and should think nothing of the matter if we were sure it was a deliberate act of that party of Indians. In that case the presumption would be, that they were the same Indians that fired on Tate and Boone, this spring, and are of no consequence. It is now reduced to a certaintly, that they were Cherokees, a parcel of banditti that you have all heard us often mention, and on whom my suspicions immediately fell; on the first information of the mischief. We say reduced to a certainty, -- we think our authority good. Our hunters have at two different times, met with some Shawnese, at a salt-lick about forty miles from this place, who informed them 'twas Cherokees -- Will Emery and his party. They say that they brought the scalps to their nation; and described the stolen horses as well as their owners could have done, -- and do not omit a rifle gun which they got from Inman, without a ramrod, and carried her in that condition to the nation. Cornstalk, their chief, was much dissatisfied, and cousulted with his own warriors and some traders about the matter, and talked about taking and delivering them up to the whites, lest his own people might be unjustly blamed. The Cherokees got wind of something to their disadvantage, and ran off to the Mingoes, since which we have heard nothing from them. The Shawnese were so desirious of vindicating their innocence, that they obtained certificates from the chief traders of the truth of these facts, before they would venture into our neighborhood. "Tis true, our men did not see their letters, because the Indians were not at camp, and our men had not time to go with them, though much importuned for that purpose.> (4B34-35, continued)

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:05:56 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25318
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25318


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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7/18/75-10: <We are also credibly informed that King Cornstalk went to see Capt. Russell, at Point Pleasant, as soon as the Cherokee left his town, in order to acquaint him of the particulars, and moreover remove suspicion with respect to his people. If these accounts of the friendly and cautious demeanor of the Shawnese be true, -- and we verily believe they are, -- you will be at no loss in determining on that part of Mr. Martin's intelligence respecting the six Northward Indians. 'Tis possible that the Mingoes might make such application, but the Shawnese are far from it, and we do not believe it of the others. These, and such like falsities, are easily and very often, manufactured, and ought to obtain no kind of credit. <Whether Lord Dunmore and Col. Byrd have interfered with the Indians or not, R. Henderson is equally ignorant and indifferent. The utmost result of their efforts can only serve to convince them of the futility of their scheme, and possibly frighten some few faint-hearted persons, naturally prone to reverence great names and fancy every thing must shrink at the magic of a splendid title.> (4B35-36, continued)

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:06:21 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25319
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25319


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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7/18/75-11: <Matters of more importance to the Company demand our more immediate attention. To spirit up the people, and convice them of the goodness of our country, and that the Indians in general are friendly, would be of real service and cause them to venture out. Our enterprise has now come to a crisis, and a few weeks will decide in the matter. Harrodsburg and the Boiling Spring Settlements, which sometime ago could have armed and turned out seventy or eighty men at a short warning, are almost abandoned. On the most emergent occasion they could not rally twenty men; and the better half of them are in the woods on the north side of Kentucky, and perhaps could not be summoned to our assistance in less than a fortnight. Boonesborough to-morrow night will not be able to muster more than ten or twelve men. <The news of the small skirmish in the Valley, we suppose, will keep back the people from the frontiers a short time; and we have already sensibly felt the effects of that little disaster, and may probably have cause of complaint a consieerable time. <Our salt is exhausted, and the men who went with Col. Boone for that article are not returned. We are informed that Mrs. Boone was not delivered the other day, and therefore do not know when to look for him; and, until he comes, the devil himself can't drive the others this way. David Johnston, one of the men who undertook this business, has, we are also informed, taken a small trip to Orange, and can best inform yo of the particulars, and how he has disposed of the horses under his care.> (4B36-37, continued)

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:06:49 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25320
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25320


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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7/18/75-12: <These things with respect to us are of no moment, and are no more than little disasters, which, amongst other things, serve to diversify life for the present, and will pass off with the next change of fortune. As the Indians cannot be acquainted with a true state of our weakness, nor do we believe, have thoughts of forcing the settlement, we hope that in a little time the people on the other side of the mountains will take courage and venture out. Harvest is now over, and as soon as the affair in the Valley ahs been talked and fought over half a dozen times, we shall have men enough to answer every purpose. <Our considering the several reports and occurances between us and the Indians, we have thought it proper to write to the chiefs of the Cherokee Nation, informing them of the mischief done this spring, as well as that attempted the other day in the Valley, together with our reasons for suspecting some of their people. This letter is conceived in terms, that, we think, will be approved of by the company; as it has a tendency to convince the Indians of our friendly intentions, and sacred regard to the solemn engagements entered into at Watauger [sic], as well as a just sense of the infraction of that treaty. <As we have thought it unnecessary to be at the expense of an express, this letter and its answer must run the risk of a passage by the way of Watauger. <And now, dear Sirs, which of you all are willing to exchange births with us? Is this matter settled, and the person ready to start with a sufficient stock of resolution to remain here five or six months, if required? We cannot doubt but some of you have undertaken this business, and will be on the spot by the end of August. The country might invite a prince from his palace, merely for the pleasure of contemplating its beauty and excellence; but only add the rapturous idea of property, and what allurements can the world offer as an equivalent for the loss of so glorious a prospect? Our crop of corn is beyond all description, and will scarcely admit of a deduction for untimely planting, cultivation, and being somewhat pinched with a dry season. In short, a description of our country is a vain attempt, there being nothing elsewhere to compare it with, and there can be only known to those who visit.> (4B38-39, concluded; citing LOUISVILLE LITERARY NEWS-LETTER, 5/9/1840

File: 4B1.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:07:43 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25321
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25321


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Emigrants of fall 1775: George Rogers Clark, Simon Kenton, Benjamin Logan, William Whitley, all excellent men. <The great mass, however, were of a different class, roving, restless & transient; traversing the country, some selecting their future homes, and others admiring the beauties of the wilderness orindulging in the pleasures of the chase. The countless herds of buffalo had already begun to recede from the new settlements, and the scarcity of other game now began to be so sensibly felt, that "hunt or starve" was the only alternative.> (4B40)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:18:55 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25322
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25322


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Col. Floyd to Col. Preston, BOONESBOROUGH, 9/1/1775: <But I must drop my pen, for it is too dark to write, and I have no candle, and, as soon as it is day, I am obliged to go and hunt or starve.> (quoted 4B40n)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:20:08 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25323
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25323


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Capt. Floyd estimated the number of settlers at about 300 at the end of May, 1775 (citing Floyd letter of 5/30/75); three months later, as a result of an increasing number of skirmishes with the Indians, there could scarcely have been fifty remaining, not counting "a great many land-jobbers from towards Pittsburg, who go about on the north side of Kentucky, in companies, and build forty or fifty cabins a piece on lands where no surveying has yet been done." (citing Floyd letter of 9/1/75, 4B40)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:20:51 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25324
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25324


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Left for NC about 5/10/75, leaving Capt. Floyd to attend to the land office business. (4B40)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:21:37 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25325
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25325


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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The girls asked Nathan Reid to accompany them, but at the last minute he was busy and they went without him. Betsey had become experienced in using the paddle and <they never for a moment apprehended the least danger.> They were in a dug-out or canoe. <The two Miss Calloways each using a paddle, while Jemima Boone sat in the stern holding the stearing oar, with her sore foot dangling over the side of the boat.> Talk of visiting a small island below where wild onions could be harvested to make a poultice for Jemima's foot. One of the Calloway girls proposed stopping on the opposite shore to gather flowers, but Jemima <slightly opposed the idea of touching on the Indian shore, saying she was afraid of the YELLOW BOYS.> They tried to turn the boat around, <but not being very skilful with the oars, and the current here setting in pretty strongly towards the cliff, they found their canoe, contrary to their wishes, and despite all their esertions, almost upon the northern shore. Suddenly five Indians rushed out from a thicket of cane and bushes where they had been concealed, and one of them, more impatient than the rest to secure the prize, dashed into the water waist deep, and seizing hold of the buffalo tug at the prow with thich the boat was fastened when not in use, attempted to draw the canoe ashore. When Fanny Calloway, though the smallest of the three, yet fearless of danger, commenced plying her paddle pretty freely over the Indian's head & shoulders until she broke it by the operation. Her sister joining her in this demonstration, & other Indians now coming to the relief of their half-discomfitted fellow, and making motions toward upsetting the canoe, the girls desisted from their belligerent attitude, were hurried ashore uttering piercing screams, the canoe upset and sent adrift, when all quickly disappeared.> (4B79-80)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:23:20 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25326
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25326


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Nathan Reid, who came to KY with Floyd when a man in his early 20s, remembering those days to his son 1: <Our time was mostly spent in locating and surveying lands, or in hunting the buffalo and deer, of which there were vast herds. Sometimes we extended our excursions far into the country -- and what a country it was at that day! It would be difficult for the most fertile imagination to draw an exaggerated picture of its then lovely appearance. The siol was black as ink, and light as a bank of ashes. A person passing through the woods might be tracked almost as easily as through the snow. Often for many days together have Capt. Floyd and myself wandered in various directions through the land; sometimes tearing our way through thick cane-breaks, not knowing at what moment we might be shot down by the Indians, or fall into their hands to suffer a more cruel death. Whenever night overtook us, there we laid down and slept, if sleep we could. Sometimes strange sounds and noises, to which we were unused, broke from the solemn wilderness; then again the screams of night birds, and the squalls of wild beasts in their distant lair, made us feel very sensibly that we were in a strange land, and caused us many times to turn uneasily upon our leafy bed. At other times, on awaking in the morning after a night's sound sleep, and hearing the buffalo bulls lowing in all directions around us, it was difficult to resist the impression that we were not in an old settled country.> (Nathan Reid to his son Nathan Reid Jr, mss, quoted on 4B67-68) continued

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:25:03 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25327
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25327


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Nathan Reid, who came to KY with Floyd when a man in his early 20s, remembering those days to his son 2: <We lived, meanwhile, entirely on the flesh of wild game -- such as turkies, deer, bear, and buffalo, which we ate with out bread or salt. The hump on the back of the buffalo was regarded by us as a great delicacy. It consists of a streak of fat and a streak of lean, and when properly cooked would be considered [word missing] by a city epicure. <Strange as it may appear, it is nevertheless true, that amid all the dangers, privations and exposures of our situation, a very considerable portion of our time was spent in real enjoyment. The abundance and variety of the game -- the pleasure of hunting -- the novelty of the life we led -- the dreams we indulged of better days to come, all combined to keep up our spirits, and banish uneasiness from our thoughts. Frequently have Floyd and I sat down on a log, or at the foot of a tree, and giving a free rein to our heated imaginations, constructed many a glorious castle in the air.> (Nathan Reid to his son Nathan Reid Jr, mss, quoted on 4B67-68) continued

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:25:36 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25328
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25328


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Nathan Reid, who came to KY with Floyd when a man in his early 20s, remembering those days to his son 3: <We would, on such occasions, contrast the many discomforts that then beset us, with the pleasures we should one day enjoy in the possession of boundless wealth: spread out before us lay the finest body of land in the world, any quantity of which; with but little exertion, we could make our own. We clearly foresaw that it would not be long before these lands would be justly appreciated, and sought after by thousands. Then we should be rich as we cared to be. These golden visions of the future, however, so far as I was concerned, were never realized.> (Nathan Reid to his son Nathan Reid Jr, mss, quoted on 4B67-68)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:26:30 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25329
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25329


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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DB brought family to KY at the end of 8/75, accompanied by 20 young men. Arrived at BOONESBOROUGH 9/6 or 7. This emigration gave to the settlement "the prestige of permanency." (4B42)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:28:00 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25330
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25330


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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At a meeting of the proprietors of the company, held at Oxford, Granville County, NC, [in 9/75?] it was voted "that a present of two thousand acres of land be made to Col. Daniel Boone, with the thanks of the proprietors for the gisnal services he has rendered to the company." Draper comments: <Though the proprietors INTENDED to be generous to Boone for the "signal services" he had performed for them -- giving them their information concerning the country -- attending the Watagua treaty, and defining the boundaries of the purchase -- heading the pioneers in marking the road to Kentucky, and founding Boonesborough -- yet when Virginis asserted her right, and the company failed to maintain their claim to the country, Boone troubled himself no more about his "present." It remained an unfilfilled promise. As the company afterwards received two hundred thousand acres of land from Virginia & the same from North Carolina, for the losses they had sustained by the enterprise, a strict regard to justice would have prompted a remembrance of the "signal services" of their early & efficient agent.> (4B45n)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:29:12 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25331
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25331


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Memorial of the company-1: Prepared by the proprietors [in 9/75?], for presentation to the Continental Congress, carried by James Hogg, appointed delegate to Congress. After alluding to their purchase from the Cherokees "for a large and valuable consideration," proceeded to observe: <They will not trouble the honoragle Congress with a detail of the risks and dangers to which they have been exposed, arising from the nature of the enterprise itself, as well as from the wicked attempts of certain governors and their emissaries; they beg leave only to acquaint them, that through difficulties and dangers, at a great expense, and with the blood of several of their followers, they have laid the foundation of a Colony, which, however mean in its origin, will, if one may guess from present apearances, be one day considerable in America. <The memorialists having made this purchase from the aborigines and immemorial possessors, the sole and uncontrested owners of the country, in fair and open treaty, and without the violation of any British or American law whatever, are determined to give it up only with their lives. And though their country be far removed from the reach of ministerial usurpation, yet they cannot look with indifference on the late arbitrary proceedings of the British Parliament. If the united Colonies are reduced, or will temaly submit to be slaves, Tryansylvania will have reason to fear.> (4B45-46, continued)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:29:56 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25332
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25332


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Memorial of the company-2: <The memorialists by no means forget their allegiance to their sovereign, whose constitutional rights and pre-eminences they will support at the risk of their lives. They flatter themselves that the addition of a new Colony, in so fair and equitable a way, and without any expense to the crown, will be acceptable to his most gracious majesty, and that Transylvania will soon be worthy of his royal regard and protection. <At the same time, having their hearts warmed with the same noble spirit that animates the united Colonies, and moved with indignation at the late ministerial and parliamentary usurpations, it is the earnest wish of the proprietors of Transylvania to be considered by the Colonies as brethren, engaged in the same great cause of liberty and of mankind. And, as by reason of several circumstances, needless to be here mentioned, it was impossible for the proprietors to call a convention of the settlers in such time as to have their concurrence laid before this Congress, they here pledge themselves for them, that they will concur in the measures now adopted by the proprietors. <From the generous plan of liberty adopted by the Congress, and that noble love of mankind which appears in all their proceedings, the memorialists please themselves that the united Colonies will take the infant Colony of Transylvania into their protection; and they, in return, will do everything in their power, and give such assistance in the general cause of America, as the Congress shall judge to be suitable to their abilities. <Therefore, the memorialists hope and earnestly request, that Transylvania may be added to the number of the united Colonies, and that James Hogg, Esq., be received as their delegate, and admitted to a seat in the honorable the Continental Congress.> (4B46-47, citing Hall, SKETCHES OF THE WEST 2:221-28)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:30:25 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25333
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25333


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Memorial of the company to the Continental Congress. Upon sounding the leading members of Congress, it was decided not to present the memorial. The purchase had been in violation of royal proclamation, and Congress at this moment was looking for some path of accomodation. Virginia opposed the colony as an infringement of their charter rights. In addition, Hogg wrote to his associates: "You would be amazed to see how much in earnest all these speculative gentlemen are about the plan to be adopted by the Transylvanians. They entreat, they pray that we may make it a free government, and beg that no mercenary or ambitious views in the proprietors may prevent. Quit-rents, they say, is a mark of vassalage, and hope they shall not be established in Transylvania. They even threaten us with their opposition, if we do not act upon liberal principles when we have it so much in our power to render ourselves immortal. Many of them advised a law against negroes." (4B48, citing Hall, SKETCHES OF THE WEST 2:248-54)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:31:06 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25334
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25334


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Advertisement appearing in the Williamsburg paper, 9/30/75: <A company of gentlemen, of North Carolina, having, for a large and valuable consideration, purchased from the chiefs of the Cherokee Indians, by and with the consent of the whole Nation, a considerable tract on their lands, now called Transylvania, lying on the rivers Ohio, Cumberland, and Louisa; and understanding that many people are desirous of becoming adventurers in that part of the world, and wish to know the terms on which lands in that country may be had, they therefore herby inform the publick, that any person who will settle on and inhabit the same, before the first day of June, 1776, shall have the privilege of taking up and surveying for himself five hundred acres, and, for each tithable person he may carry with him and settle there two hundred and fifty acres, on the payment of fifty shillings sterling per hundred, subject to an [sic] yearly quit-rent of two shillings, like money, to commence in the year 1780. <Such persons as are willing to become purchasers may correspond and treat with Mr. William Johnston, in Hillsborough, and Colonel John Williams, of Granville, North Carolina, or Colonel Richard Henderson, at Boonesborough, in Transylvania. <This country lies on the south side of the rivers Ohio and Louisa, in a temperate and healthy climate. It is in general well-watered with springs and rivulets, and has several reivers, up which vessels of considerable burden may come with ease. In different places of it are a number of salt springs, where the making of salt has been tried with great success, and where, with certainty, and quantity needed may be easily and conveniently made. Large tracts of the land lie on limestone, and in several places there is abundance of iron ore. The fertility of the soil and goodness of the range almost surpass belief; and it is at present well stored with buffalo, elk, deer, bear, beaver, &c., and the rivers abound with fish of various kinds. Vast crowds of people are daily flocking to it, and many gentlemen of the first rank and character have bargained for lands in its, so that there is a great appearance of rapid settlement, and that it will soon become a considerable Colony, and one of the most agreeable countries in America.> (4B49-50, citing AMERICAN ARCHIVES, 4th ser., 3:847)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:31:56 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25335
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25335


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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RHENDERSON with Col. John Williams and a party of some 40 men, returned to BOONESBOROUGH at the end of 11/75. Called a convention of the representatives of the Transylvania settlements to meet at Boonesborough on 12/21 to recommend a person for surveyor. Although bad weather kept many from attending, those whow did picked Floyd. (4B42-53)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:33:20 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25336
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25336


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Saturday 12/23/75 Col. Campbell with boys named Sanders and M'Qunnney crossed the river at Boonesborough for a hunt. Separated, about 10 minutes later heard a gun's report, cry of distress; persons crossed the river and met Campbell running to the landing with one shoe off, said had been fired on by a couple of Indians, who missed him. Men under DB went out, found mocassin tracks, no sign of boys. Many felt Campbell was exaggerating. At that point many other parties out hunting, fears for their safety. On Monday found M'Quinney killed and scalped in a cornfield about three miles from settlement. Sanders was never found. Indians apparently fled north after the attack. It was well known at Boonesborough that Cornstalk had said, at the Indian treaty at Fort Pitt, in 10/75, that "some half a dozen of his warward warriors had set off from the Shawanoe towns, with the intent, as they termed it, of taking a look at the white people on the Kentucky, and he was apprehensive that they might do some damage; and if any of them should get killed by the whites, no notice should be taken of it. This was believed to have been the party that committed the mischief, and particularly as abou that number of Indians had been seen nare the old War Path, about fifteen miles east of Bonesborough, two or three days before the attack." (4B53-55)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:35:08 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25337
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25337


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Enthusiastic reports about were rampant in the period of the LORDDUNMORE war. <Harrod, Floyd, Drake, and many others, who had visited Kentucky in 1774, & returning, went on the Point Pleasant campaign; and much being said among the men about the new country, hundreds resolved, if peace was made, to visit Kentucky the ensuing spring. The campaign over, the men spread the intelligence in their respective neighborhoods. "What a buzz is this," exclaims the Rev. John Brown of Rockbridge, May 5th, 1775, to Col. Wm. Preston, -- "what a buzz is this amongst the people about Kentucky! To hear them speak of it, one would think it was a new-found paradise; and I doubt not if it is such a place as prepresented, but ministers will have their congregations."> (4B56[1]n)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:36:29 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25338
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25338


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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1775: <The clashing of the interests of the Transylvania company with the proclamations fulmina [?] by Governors Martin and Dunmore; the uncertainty as to a general Indian War, the rupture of the Colonies with the mother country, together with a general scarcity of provisions and amunition in Kentucky, all conspried to unsettle the minds of the people and postpone, with many of them, a permanent settlement until a more favorable period.> (4B58)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:37:46 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25339
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25339


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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1775: <Yet upwards of nine hundred entries had been made in the Transylvania land office at Boonesborough, embracing 560,000 acres of land, and most of the purchasers wer waiting to have it surveyed. About two hundred and thirty acres of corn had been raised; horses, cattle, hogs, and poultry, introduced into the country, and Capt. Nathaniel Hart had brought and planted at Boonesborough a nursery of five hundred apple scions, which unfortunately, were subsequently destroyed by the Indians. The McAfee company had also planted apple-seeds, & peach stones at their settlement on Salt River, below harrodsburg. The germ of a permanent Colony had been planted, laws made, the militia organized, civil and military officers commissioned; the first slight Indian attacks had been repelled, and the country successfully maintained. There were, moreover, twelve women, heads of families, settled in the country.> To wit, at Boonesborough -- Mrs. Daniel Boone, Mrs. Hays, Mrs. Squire Boone, Mrs. Callaway, and Mrs. Poage; at Harrodsburg -- Mrs. McGary, Mrs. Denton, Mrs. Hogan, and Mrs. Wilson; at McClelland's Station -- Mrs. McClelland; at Whitley's Station -- Mrs. Whitley and Mrs. Clark. (4B59,59[1]n)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:39:04 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25340
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25340


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Colonists received all their supplies of gunpowder and lead from the company, paying by working on the roads, ranging, or hunting. "These accounts remain unclosed upon the books in every instance, shewing a condition of no little indebtedness for the colonists of Transylvania to the great proprietors." (4B59)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:40:25 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25341
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25341


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Harrodsburg settlers (perhaps others) during the winter of 75-76 began to complain about the proprietors raising the price of land, and because of the engrossment of the lands at the Falls of the Ohio. (4B63)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:41:34 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25342
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25342


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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During the month of March, 1775 <A Canadian Frenchman named Loramie, in the employ of the British government as an Indian interpreter, left Montreal in company with a fellow emmissary, and went to Detroit to stir up the Indians to war against the Americans -- thus carrying out the inhuman policy of Lord Dartmouth of the previous year. This betokended no good to the frontier settlements, as the sequel too clearly proved.> (4B64-65, citing AMERICAN ARCHIVES, 4th ser., 5:417, 468.)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:43:05 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25343
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25343


1776

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Virginia Convention resolved on 6/24/76 <that the inhabitants settled on the western frontiers ought to hold their lands without paying any consideration to private persons, until the validity of the title under the Cherokee purchase shall have been considered and determined by the Legislature; that all persons then actually settled on unlocated lands in Virginia, to which there should be no other just claim, should have a pre-emption right to the same; and, furthermore, that no purchase of lands within the chartered limits of Virginia, should be made, under any pretence whatever, from any Indian nation without the approbation of the Virginia Legislature> a prohibition that was soon thereafter incorporated into the VA constitution. [see AMERICAN ARCHIVES, 4s, 6:1044] On 7/4 the VA Convention appointed commissioners in 11 frontier counties to collect testimony against the validity of the Henderson purchase. [see AMERICAN ARCHIVES, 4s, 6:1610] <And thus the matter rested quietly for a considerable period, leaving the claim of the proprietors of Transylvania in a tottering and precarious condition.> (4B75-76)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:44:14 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25344
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25344


1776

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Dissention against the company flourished at Harrodsburg. According to Floyd (letter to Preston, 5/19/76), "Jack Jones it is said, is at the head of the party and fourishes away prodiciously." In elections at Harrodsburg in early June John Gabriel Jones and George Rogers Clark were chosen delegates to the Virginia Convention, carrying a petition (dated 6/15, signed by Abraham Hite, Jr/, clerk, on behalf of the people) praying to be considered citizens of VA and organized into a new county, pledging themselves to furnish their quota of man and means in support of the common cause of the united colonies. Also chose a Committee of Safety at this election with 21 persons; these men also prepared a petition to the Convention stating their grievances and recommending a list of persons for civil magistrates. (4B73-74)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:45:34 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25345
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25345


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<Within the stations men sat round the fire with loaded rifles, and told their tales of adventure and peril with new interest, as every sound reminded them how near their deadly enemies might be. And from hour to hour scouts came in with rumors of natives seen here or seen there, and parties of the bold rangers drew their belts, and left the protection of their forts to learn the truth of these floating tales. But there was one who sat at such times silent and seemingly unheeding, darning his hunting shirt, or mending his leggins, or preparing his rifle-balls for use; yet to him all eyes often turned. Two or three together, the other hunters started by day-light to reconnoitre; silently he sat working, until the day had drawn herself into the shadow of the earth, and the forest paths were wrapped in gloom. Then, noiselessly as the day had gone, he went; none saw him go, -- he had been among them a moment before, and then was missing. "And now," said the loiterers by the smouldering logs, "we shall know something sure; for old Daniel's on the track." And when, by and by, some one yet wakeful saw the shadow of Boone, as he reentered the cabin, unheard as a shadow, he found, as usual, that the solitary scout had learned all that was to be known, and the watchful slept in peace. We know nothing more characteristic than this habit of his, so quietly, alone and in the darkness, to undertake the searching of the forest infested by Indians.> (James Handasyd Perkins, MEMOIR AND WRITINGS 2:264-65, quoted on 4B69-70)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:47:30 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25346
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25346


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Settlers Memorial: In 4/75 men from Harrodsburg drew up a petition to the Virginia Convention, signed by James Harrod, Abraham Hite, Jr, and 86 others, stating that they had been at great expense and hardship in settling the country; that the T. company had advanced the price of land from twenty to fifty shillings sterling @ 100 acres and had also increased the fes of entry and survey to an exorbitant rate; that the proprietors intended to continue to raise their portions as settlement quickened; that they had recently learned that these lands on which they had settled were covered by the cessions of the Treaty of Fort Stanwix; and closed with an expression of their concurance with the cause of the united colonies, and asked that the Virginia Convention forward their petition to the Contential Congress would that be the better forum. This was presented to the Virginia Convention on 5/18 [see AMERICAN ARCHIVES, 4s, 6:1528]. (4B72-73)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:48:26 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25347
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25347


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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On 5/30 John Craig of Augusta County, VA, sent a petition, settling forth that he had visited Transylvania the preceding autumn, with some stock, in order to settle, but finding that in order to enter land, it was first necessary to declare that an Assembly ,chosen by the freeholders, should make laws as nearly similar to those of England as possible, that the governor should be chosen from among the proprietors who would have veto power over all the laws, that the Church of England should be the established church, and the petitioner declared that since he did not subscribe to these points the lands he had chosen went to men who were willing to sign. [see AMERICAN ARCHIVES, 4s, 6:1543] (4B73-74)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 5:49:13 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25348
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25348


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Scores of men ranging the country north of the KY, selecting scores of claims, building pens or cabins on them, then returning home to sell these. Called "cabiners." <These improvements would frequently be made upon land previously surveyed to satisfy officers' claims for services in the old French and Indian war, & oftentimes too on tracts of other locations, and thus were quarrels without number engendered.> (4B65)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 6:05:07 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25349
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25349


1776

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John Todd letter 6/22/76: "I'm afraid to lose sight of my house lest some invader should take possession. But why do I preach politicks? Tis a country failing, and not one MAC from Conococheague [steam in PA settled chiefly by Scotch-Irish] but would make a fool of Waller [noted Virginia lawyer] himself in talking landed politicks. I'm worried to death almost by this learned ingnoramus set; and, what is worse, there are but two lawyers [himself and John Gabriel Jones] here and they can't agree." (4B66, citing Preston Papers)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 6:06:02 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25350
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25350


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Draper says that at this early period the land of KY appeared more level than when subsequently cleared, because the density of the growth prevented the settlers from seeing the undulations of the surface. (4B66)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 6:06:58 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25351
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25351


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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"Every person then [circa 1775] expected that the country would always furnish a sufficient supply of iron, sugar from the maple, and salt from the springs, for home consumption; and all seemed to think that springs of water were scarce, that the country would be but thinly inhabited, and that the cane and other range would remain plentiful and exhaustless." (4B66-67)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 6:07:49 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25352
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25352


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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RHENDERSON and associates arrived in Williamsburg and presented their memorial to the Convention on 6/15, justifying their conduct in KY and averring that they had accommodated all settlers with lands on moderate and easy terms, observing the strictest justice and impartiality without respect to persons or their different sects or religious persuasions. [AMERICAN ARCHIVES, 4s, 6:1573-75]

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 6:08:58 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25353
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25353


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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7/7/76 Col. William Russell wrote from the Holston country advising the immediate abandonment of KY (Preston Papers, cited on 4B76)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 6:09:57 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25354
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25354


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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7/7/76 James Cooper and a German (Dutchman), both from Hinkson's Station, hunting together were fired on by a party of Shawanee; Cooper killed, the German escaping back to the station. 7/14 a man killed at the Blue Licks; several others engaged in hunting, surveying, and cabining showed up missing. (4B76-77)

File: 4B2.DR1



    Created: 7/31/2017 6:10:30 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-25355
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-25355


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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At the screams the Indians threatened their captives by seizing Betsey by the hair and brandishing their tomahawks. Up the bank to level ground. There Jemima refused to proceed saying she would rather die. The Indians gave the girls mocassins, cut their dresses and petticoats off at the knees, wraping the cut material as leggins. <Now all hurried on as rapidly as possible, the Indians generally keeping the ridges, which being more barren of herbage, left less trail than the rich low grounds covered with cane, wild clover, and pea-vine.> (4B80-81)

File: 4B3.DR1



    Created: 8/6/2017 9:28:46 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26140
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26140


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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The Indians: 3 Shawnees and 2 Cherokees, one of the later Hanging Maw, a well-known chief, who Jemima remembered haveing seen at her father's house on Watauga. He could speak good English. She told him she was DB's daughter. He asked if the Calloways were her sisters, and she replied yes, thinking that he would be more likely to spare and treat them well knowing they were the children of his old friend Boone. <The old chief langghingly responded, "We have done pretty well for old Boone this time."> (4B81)

File: 4B3.DR1



    Created: 8/6/2017 9:42:07 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26141
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26141


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Draper sources: Capt. Floyd letter 7/21/1776; ms letter of Capt. Mathew Arbuckle, 8/15/1776; Nathaniel Reid (the last surviving member of the rescue party) ms notes; conversations with: Capt. John Gass (a youth at Boonesborough at the time); Nathan Boone and wife (who often heard both DB and Jemima relate the particulars); Isaiah Boone and Judge Moses Boone (both kids in '76); Mrs. Elizabeth Thomas (12yrs old at the time); Mrs Frances Lamme and Mrs. Elizabeth Bryan (daughters of Jemima and Flanders Calloway); correspondence with Alfred Henderson, Mrs. Elizabeth Dixon, and Mrs. Eudoria Estill, children of Elizabeth Callaway and Samuel Henderson; Mrs. Elizabeth Williams and Mrs. Frances McGuire, daughters, and Richard P. Holder and W. D. Holder, grandchildren of Frances Callaway and John Holder; Ms statements of the late Daniel Bryan, Col. Wm. Martin, Maj. Bland W. Ballard, Col. Richard Callaway, Jr., David Henry, Marj. John Redd, and Capt. Henry Wilson; Joseph McCormick, Sr., Maj. John L. Martin, Willis A. Bush, Morgan Bryan and others; ms narratives of Maj. Pleasant Henderson (who visited Boonesborough shortly after the captivity and rescue; and the late Mrs. Lucy Brashear, who went to reside at Boonesborough shortly after the occurrence. Published works consulted: Bradford, Hildreth's Pioneer History [?], Perkins article in the North American Review, January 1846, Nathaniel Hart's newspaper sketches [Shane collection?].

File: 4B3.DR1



    Created: 8/6/2017 9:43:38 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26142
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26142


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Draper on other accounts: <Flint is replete with error, as also are articles upon the captivity in Hunt's Western Review for January, 1820, and Hall's Western Monthly Magazine for September, 1833. Boone himself has told the story in less than half a dozen lines, while Marshall & McClung were unable to add anything to it; and Hall, in his Sketches of the West, but re-vamps the unreliable narrative in Hunt's Review.> (4B99n)

File: 4B3.DR1



    Created: 8/6/2017 10:09:33 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26143
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26143


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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1st night camped about six miles from the river, 3 miles sw of Winchester, Clark county, KY. Captives pinioned at their elbows so their hands could not come together; each beyond the others' reach; tug with which they were tied made fast to a tree, Indians lay across rope. Girls back against a tree, surrounded by sleeping Indians. <Thus without sleep, the girls sat with their backs against a tree, weary and anxious during the tedious vigils of the night -- the dull monotony of chirping insects occasionally relieved by the howling of wolves or hooting of owls. Jemima Boone remembering that she had a pen-knife in her pocket, made an effort to reach it, that she might cut herself and companions loose and make their escape, for the Indians appreared to sleep soundly; but so closely was she pinioned, that she could not effect her object.> (4B82)

File: 4B3.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:16:45 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26144
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26144


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Monday evening: smoked buffalo tongue, shared with the girls -- not salted, so hard, so unpalatable ate little. <The girls were sometimes honored by their savage captors with a show of kindness and affection, and generously complimented as being "pretty squaws," but no improprieties were attempted -- which, to the honor of the Indian race be it spoken, are seldom, if ever, committed upon their helpless female captives.> Indians were socialable and communicative, and through Hanging Maw conversed with the girls. They were going to the Shawnee towns. The Cherokee had killed or driven all the settlers from the Watauga country, party of fourteen more were at that moment looking for trouble on the Kentucky. <The girls retained several words of their language, which were known to be Shawanoese. During the march, the Indian upon whom Fanny Callaway had laid the canoe-paddle with so much spirit, was greatly joked by his companions.> Camped a few miles south of the Hinkson's Ferry crossing on the Licking; night spent as unpleasantly as the previous. Tried to get some sleep. <Betsey Callaway had been particularly assiduous in encouraging the younger girls, & keeping up their flagging spirits.> (4B85)

File: 4B3.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:20:29 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26145
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26145


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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July 16th, third day, Tuesday morning: Indians seemed to display a new confidence of escape. 9 AM crossed Hinkson's Fork, 13 miles to Upper Blue Licks; few miles beyond Indians decided to take some game, shot a buffalo, took the hump. Pushed to next stream where they intended to stop and cook the first meal. (4B86)

File: 4B3.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:20:50 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26146
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26146


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Sunday, Boonesborough: shrieks of the girls heard by their parents and friends, DB leaped from the bed in his cabin on which he had been napping; seized his rifle and ran to the river with others, without his moccasins. Capt. Floyd and Nathan Reid conversing under the shade of an elm, did not hear; saw Caleb Callaway running toward them with the tale of capture. Preparations taking place in the cabins. DB running down the river with others to retreive the loosed dugout. Samuel Henderson, Betsey Callaway's fiance, was in midst of shaving, left when half done. Flanders Callaway in love with Jemima; wants to go on rescue mission. <Boone was cool and determined -- Col. Callaway much more excited, and both, like tender parents, were filled with anxious solicitude for the safety of their children. The reader can but faintly imagine the aching hearts and wringing hands of mothers, brothers, sisters, friends, left behind in Boonesborough.> (4B87)

File: 4B3.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:21:12 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26147
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26147


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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On the river: "Who will swim over after the canoe?" Perhaps Indians on the other side awaited a lone swimmer; John Gass, 12 years old, plunged into the water, DB, Floyd, Reid, Henderson, Wm B. Smith, others providing cover; Gass back, great applause. <The sun was now about an hour and a half high, when Boone with five others [above] crossed the river.> Col. Callaway, Capt. Nathaniel Hart, Capt. David Hart, Capt. David Gass (father John), Flanders Callaway, and five or six others, mounted, dashed down stream to the ford, about a mile below. (4B88)

File: 4B3.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:21:43 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26148
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26148


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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DB gave Nathan Reid the following piece of advice: "In your tramps thgouth the country, never look for an Indian, but keep a sharp look out for their guns lying across logs or fallen timber." (Quoting Reid ms notes, 4B88n)

File: 4B3.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:22:19 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26149
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26149


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Over the river, DB divided party to quickly discover Indian route. DB, Gass, Henderson down river, Floyd, Reid, Smith up. <Col. Callaway's mounted party soon came up to Boone and his companions, who by this time had bent their course up stream, and struck the trail in the rear of Floyd's party.> Callaway insisted on following directly on the Indian trail; DB objected, pointing to danger of Indians tomahawking the girls upon discovery. Callaway and horsemen to Lower Blue Licks to cut off the Indians and the Licking crossing; DB and "footmen" cautiously follow trail. Floyd's party in lead, pushed up trail until nightfall; at that moment DB came up. Heard a dog bark, cautiously crept up, came upon a party of 9 men building a cabin. Her stayed the night, sent Gass back for ammunition, provisions, breech-clouts, <for it being Sunday, the men had on pantaloons, which somewhat impeded their movements.> He brought back items, plus DB's moccasins; jerked venison <which was the only article the women could supply from their scanty larders.> How Gass found his way at night with no trail to follow "is passing strange." (4B89-90)

File: 4B3.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:22:51 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26150
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26150


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John McMillen: out hunting with John Gass (12 years old). At Harrod's Lick, north side of Stoner's Fork of Licking, wounded a buffalo bull, following trail; thick weeds and bushes, came close upon the wounded animal, which turned and ran over him, breaking his gun, badly mangling him. Aided by Gass, back to Boonesborough; recovered enough that was a cabin-builder at time of captivity, aided in rescue. Fall of 1776 left to join Col. Christian on his Cherokee campaign; acting as a spy in advance of the party, was killed in Moccasin Gap, near the north fork of the Holston. (4B90n)

File: 4B3.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:23:22 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26151
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26151


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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William Bush (1747-1815): with DB in '73 failed KY remove; with the Wilderness Road makers to Boonesborough in '75. At Boonesborough through 77, 78, many other contests with the Indians. 1790 commanded company of KY on Harmar's campaign. Preemption claim mile and half from Boonesborough, north side of KY, Clark county, where he died. 5'8", heavy, great energy, perserverance, benevolence, no ostentation. (4B90n)

File: 4B3.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:24:01 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26152
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26152


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John Martin (1736-1821): with NY provincials during French war. 75 down Ohio with John Hinkson and others to KY; crop of corn that year on south fork of Licking; rescue; 77 employed as spy at Logan's Station, defense when attacked in 5/77. 6/78 wounded in skirmish near present Washington, KY. Attack on Boonesborough 78 he procured reinforcements of 150 men for defense of KY from Holston settlements. Winter 79-80 built Martin's Station, mile below the present town of Paris, on Licking, but not there when it was captured the following spring. Clark's expedition of 1780, 81 captain building boats for Clark's intended Detroit expedition. Assisted in burying the dead at the Blue Licks 82; led company on Clark's Shawnee campaign that fall, and on Logan's campaign in 86. Member of Danville Convention of 5/85. Settled in Lincoln county. Large frame, familiarly known as "the big Yankee," for his NY birth and childhood. (4B90[1]n)

File: 4B3.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:24:36 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26153
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26153


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Rescuers, Monday morning: DB and five set off joined by three cabiners: John McMillen, William Bush, and John Martin. Came upon Indian's camp of night before. Difficulty in picking up the trail. <Life or death, captivity or freedom, was the stake at issue, and was to be determined by the right use of every moment. Boone well understanding all this, and observing by the general course the Indians had taken, that they were aiming for the Shawanoe towns on Scioto, stopped and remarked, that it would never do to follow them in that way,for they were making tracks faster than their pursuers; and, moreover, wuntil the Indians should become less cautious of pursuit, it would not be safe to keep upn the trail if they could, lest the whites should be first observed by the sentinel the Indians usually keep in their rear on their back track, and the captives tomahawked rather than suffer them to be re-taken.> Struck off to the east, hurried on a more direct path, occasionally falling in with the trail, finding the girls' "sign." Saw broken twigs, handkerchief, even the heel marks; these cheered them and caused them to redouble their efforst. Camped for the night, exhausted, with little to eat or drink. (4B91-92)

File: 4B3.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:25:08 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26154
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26154


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Rescuers, Tuesday morning: pushing ahead with all their strength. 10AM reached Hinkson's Fork. <Boone pausing a moment, observed to his followers, that from the course the Indians pursued, he was confident their trai would be found crossing the stream but a short distance below; and sure enough, they had not gone down over two hundred yards before they struck the trail. Now had traveled 35 miles. Fresh tracks, muddy water; DB now followed trail directly, thinking the Indians to be less cautious now. Entered on the great War Path from the Cherokee to the Shawnee nations; trail meandered among this and buffalo paths. The Indians <little knew the man who headed the advancing whites, for he had an eye as keen as any Indians, and at once comprehended all their wiles and stratagems.> Trotted ahead another eight or nine miles, where they came to the slaughtered buffalo. <The blood was yet trickling from the carcase, and Boone remarked that he was certain the Indians would stop to cook at the first water.> (4B93)

File: 4B3.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:25:33 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26155
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26155


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Rescue: Came across a small snake the Indians had "scotched," still writhing in death. Ten miles from Hinkson's Fork came to a small stream where the trail entirely disappeared. Indians had waded along its bed. Now mid-day. DB knew they were close at hand. Used great caution. No man to fire without the signal from DB. Henderson, Reid, others below, DB, Floyd, the rest to the right; 2-300 yds, down a slope, Indians kindling their fire in the glen below, near a small branch. W.B. Smith in the lead first saw them, silently waved to the others to come up, raised his gun -- was seen by the Indians, fired, and missed! DB and Floyd, hurrying up, fired, each mortally wounding his man. One other shot, from a distance, but without effect. At the moment the rescuers came up, the Indian sentenel had dropped his gun and run down to the fire to light his pipe and pick up the items for mending his moccasins; "and was pusily engaged in overhauling his budget, one was picking up wood, another preparing the meat for cooking, another reclining, near the girls, apparently their guard; Hanging Maw had just gone to the branch with a kettle for water. Floyd's shot hit the sentenel, who tumbled into the fire, instantly jumped up and ran off. Another Indian, running off, sent his tomahawk flying at Betsey's head, barely missing her. (4B95-96)

File: 4B3.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:26:52 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26156
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26156


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Tuesday noon, the Indians stop to cook the buffalo. The girls still hoped for deliverance, but had become dispirited. Sitting on a log, Fanny on one side of Betsey, Jemima on the other, both with their hads on Betsey's lap. Guns flash, the men raise the war whoop, chasing off the Indians without a chance to take anything. Floyd: "We sent them off almost naked." Girls instantly on their feet; Jemima: "That's daddy!" Screams of joy, rush toward the men, DB commanded to thrown selves down, out of fire. Did so, but quickly up, running to the rescuers. <One of the whites just coming up, mistaking Betsey Callaway, with a red bandanna handkerchief around her head, with her dress cut off short, for a wounded Indian, in the excitement of the moment clubbed his gun, and was in the act of striking her, perhaps a death-blow, when his arm was fortunately arrested by Boone, who exclaimed, "For God's sake don't kill her when we have travelled so far to save her from death!" The man upon discovering his error, wept like a child.> (4B96)

File: 4B3.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:27:30 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26157
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26157


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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The girls very excited, especially the younger two. Actually all in some danger if the Indians had reappeared and joined the fight. Floyd: "The place was covered with thick cane, and being so much elated on recovering the three poor little heart-broken girls, we were prevented form making any further search." Indians had fled with only a shot-gun, no ammunition, knives, tomahawks, without even their moccasins, <which, when they stop, they generally take off to dry, for their longer preservation.> The two Indians shot ran into the woods, where they died. (4B97)

File: 4B3.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:27:53 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26158
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26158


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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William Wilson, messenger then in Indian country to invite Wyandot to council at Pittsburgh, heard "that the white people over the big river had fired on a party of Shawanees and Cherokees; that one of the party had got into the Shawanese towns, who said that one of the Shawanees was certainly killed, and he did not know but more of them were, for there were a great many guns fired at them." Later heard the Indians had been doing mischief, that the settlers had "killed two of the Shawanoes, & rescured the prisoners; that the the Cherokees had sent a tomahawk-belt, with two scalps tied to it, to the Shawanees, informing them that they had struck the white people," and invited them to join in the war. (citing Hildreth's Pioneer History:99-100, 4B97n)

File: 4B3.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:29:08 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26159
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26159


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Capt. Arbuckle, 8/15/76 to Col. Wm. Fleming: "This day my messengers returned from the Shawanoe towns, with one of the Shawanoe chiefs and brother of the Cornstalk's, who informs me that after the Shawanoe and Cherokee party had taken three women prisoners from Cantuckee, the whites followed and retook the prisoners and killed two of their men." (citing ms. Fleming Papers, 4B97n)

File: 4B3.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:29:52 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26160
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26160


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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When the girls were sufficiently recovered to speak, they told their rescuers what the Indians had told them -- about the Cherokee disturbances on Watauga, of the Cherokee warparty on the Kentucky, that a large body of Indians were assembled at the Upper Blue Licks, only three miles away. Thus no time was lost in beginning the return march. (4B98)

File: 4B4.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:32:37 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26161
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26161


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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The girls were exhausted, especially Betsey, upon whom the main responsibility for the others had fallen, as eldest; but they were joyous on the way back. Samuel Henderson, with his half-shaved face, came in for his share of jokes. They again came upon the abandoned pony; this time the girls had no trouble riding him. They were not overtaken by Callaway and his mounted party until they were across the river from Boonesborough; he had discovered the tracks of a retreating Indian, and concluding that DB had successfully completed his mission, had rushed to return to the fort. (4B99)

File: 4B4.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:33:03 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26162
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26162


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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While the rescuers were gone, the Cherokee party had burned the empty cabin of David and Nathaniel Hart, about a half mile from Boonesborough, also destroying a garden and nursery. But there were no further attacks during the remainder of 1776. The Cherokees were preoccupied with fighting to the south; the Northern Indians (Cornstalk of the Shawnee and White-Eyes of the Delawares) were talking with the Americans at Pittsburg at the moment. (4B100)

File: 4B4.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:33:42 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26163
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26163


1776

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Seven stations abandoned in the aftermath of the girls' kidnapping: 1) Huston's Station people took refuge at McClelland's; 2) Bryan's on Elkhorn; 3) Lee's Town on Kentucky; 4) Harrod's or Boiling Spring Settlement; 5) Whitley's abandoned and went to 6) Logan's, then all went to Harrodsburg; 7) Hinkson's on Licking to Boonesborough on their way to Virginia and Pennsylvania. Floyd: <They all seem deaf to any thing we can say to dissuade them. Ten, at least, of our own people, are going to join them, which will leave us with less than thirty men in this fort. I think more than three hundred men have left the country since I came out, and not one has arrived, except a few CABINERS down the Ohio. I want to return as much as any person can do; but if I leave the country now, there is scarcely one single man who will not follow the example. When I think of the deplorable condition a few helpless families are likely to begin, I conclude to sell my life as dearly as I can in their defence, rather than make an ignominious escape. I am afraid it is in vain to me for any relief from Virginia, yet the Convention encouraged the settlement of this country, and why should not the extreme parts of Fincastle be as justly entitled to protection as any other part of the country? If an expedition were carried on against those nations who are at open war with the people in general, we might be in a great measure relieved by drawing them off to defend their towns. If any thing under Heaven can be done for us, I know of no person who would more willingly engage in forwarding us assistance than yourself. I do, at the request and in behalf of all the distressed women and children and other inhabitants of this place, implore the aid of every leading man who may have it in his power to give us relief. I cannot write. You can better guess at my ideas from what I have said than I can express them.> (Floyd to Preston, 7/21/76, quoted on 4B102)

File: 4B4.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:34:27 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26164
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26164


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Seven stations had broken up; three remained by late summer of '76: McClland's, Harrodsburg, and Boonesborough. The people at these places set themselves to work building pallisades. Before this not one of the stations had been fortified. (4B102-03)

File: 4B4.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:35:44 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26165
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26165


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Betsey Callaway and Samuel Henderson were the first couple married in Kentucky: 8/7/76, DB officiating as a magistrate under Transylvania authority. She wore a plain Irish linen dress; he borrowed Nathan Reid's hunting shirt. Col. Callaway required a bond from Henderston that he would have the marriage again solemnized by authority less doubtful at the earliest opportunity, which was agreed to and later done. (4B103-04)

File: 4B4.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:36:50 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26166
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26166


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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A major problem in 76 with supply of powder and lead. Arthur Campbell of Holston had sent a limited supply to DB, and he had sold it to the people of Boonesborough at 6s/pound for powder, 10p/pound for lead, saving one pound of powder and two of lead for the scouts. (citing ms letter of DB to Preston, 9/7/76) Harrod and Logan back to Holston for another supply; returned after 20 day absence. (4B105)

File: 4B4.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:48:37 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26167
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26167


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Large crops of corn were raised during 1776; they were generally cribbed int he fields where they were raised. In November Thomas Denton put in the first crop of wheat. (4B106)

File: 4B4.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:49:57 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26169
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26169


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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By 11/76 many people began to return to their deserted camps; many believing there would be no Indian attacks. More cabiner "improvements" made during '76 than the previous year, as shown by the records of the commissioners for granting settlement rights and pre-emptions. (4B107)

File: 4B4.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:51:11 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26170
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26170


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Clark, in VA as delegate to the Convention, met with Gov. Henry and finally convinced the Executive Council to provide him with an order for 500 pounds of gunpowder, to be conveyed to Pittsburg for the use of the "inhabitants of KENTUCKI." (4B107

File: 4B4.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:51:52 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26171
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26171


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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10/7/76 the new republican legislature of VA met; Clark and Jones laid the KY memorial before it; they were not seated, but a bill passed on 12/7 for the creation of the County of Kentucky, despite the opposition of Col. Henderson. <This legislation, ortganizing Kentucky into a separate county, was emphatically a repudiation of the claim of Henderson and company, and virtually the downfall of the Transylvania government,> although it was not until 11/78 that the VA legislature formally declared Henderson's claim null and void, at which time Henderson & Co. were also voted 200,000 acres in Green River country as compensation for the great expense involved in clearing Cherokee title. A similar grant of land along the Clinch and Powell were made by NC. (4B108)

File: 4B4.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 2:52:50 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26172
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26172


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Clark and Jones descended the Ohio with their load of powder and other stores, which they left at Limestone, went overland to Harrodsburg, then Jones returned with a party of men to bring in the ammunition. On Christmas Day, five miles northeast of the Lower Blue Licks they were ambushed by a party of 40 or 50 Indians, mostly Mingoes under Capt. Pluggy; Jones and William Graden were killed, Joseph Rogers and Josiah Dixon taken prisoners, the rest escaped. Sunday 12/29 the same Mingoes attacked McClelland's Station; Pluggy killed and the Indians finally repulsed, four settlers wounded, two mortally (John McClelland and Charles White). Indians killed cattle and horses. Finally the ammunition brought in by a party of 30 men in January. (4B109-10)

File: 4B4.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:01:19 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26173
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26173


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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McClelland's Station abandoned after the Indian attack of 12/76 on 1/30/77 and removed to Harrodsburg. Now only two settlements (perhaps three -- if one counts Price's Settlement on the Cumberland; almost no info about it), perhaps only 150 white men in KY. (4B111

File: 4B4.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:06:17 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26174
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26174


1777

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Capt. Hugh McGary, chairman of the KY Committee of Safety, to Gov. and council of VA, 2/27/77: <We are surrounded with enemies on every side; every day increases their numbers. To retreat from the place where our all is centered, would be little preferable to death. Our fort [Harrodsburg] is already filled with widows and orphans; their necessities call upon us daily for supplies. Yet all this would be tolerable could we but see the dawn of peace; but a continuance of our woes threaten us -- a rueful war presents itself before us. The apprehension of an incursion the ensuing spring fills our minds with a thousand fears. The brave despise danger, even death, on their own account; it is the state of weak infancy and helpless widowhood that sets heavy on us.> (quoted 4B112)

File: 4B4.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:07:04 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26175
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26175


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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The Indians "saw their perpetual enemy taking possession of their HUNTING GROUND, to them the source of amusement, of supply, and of traffic, and they were determined to dispute it to the utmost extent of their means." (quoting Humphrey Marshall, THE HISTORY OF KENTUCKY, 4B114)

File: 4B4.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:08:39 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26176
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26176


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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all quiet in 1-2/77. Logan's Station reoccuppied in Feb. In March came the despatches with news of the organization of Kentucky county, and the names of the new militia officers: George Rogers Clark, major; DB, Harrod, John Todd, and B. Logan captains. <Prior to this every fort and every camp had its own selected chief, with but little order or subordination.> 3/5 the county militia organized at Boonesborough, Harrodsburg, and Logan's Station. (4B115)

File: 4B4.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:09:21 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26177
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26177


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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3/6/77 James Ray, William Coomes, and Thomas Shores at work clearing land at the Shawanoe Springs, 4 miles ne of Harrodsburg, for Hugh McGary, Ray's step-father. Ray and Shores left to visit a neighboring camp where Ray's bro Wm was sugar-making in order to "slake their thrist with the sugar-water." Attacked by a party of 70 Shawnee (according to Coomes; 47 according to Ray) under BLACKFISH or Cot-ta-wa-ma-go; killed and scalped William Ray, captured Shore, James Ray escaped "by his uncommon fleetness, though long and hotly pursued." Blackfish later remarked that the boy outran all his warriors. Coomes hid nearby in a treetop and witnessed their mutilation of Ray's body, their drinking of the sap, their singing war songs and dancing the scalp-dance. Toward evening a party of 30 mounted men went out from Harrodsburg in search of the missing men; came upon Ray's body, the sight of which turned MeGary faint and he almost fell from his mount. One may cried out "See here! they have killed poor Coomes!" at which point Coomes triumphantly exclaimed, "No, they haven't killed me, by Job! I'm safe!" The men buried Ray and returned to Harrodsburg. The captive Shores later joined the British at Detroit and never returned. (4B115-16)

File: 4B4.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:10:21 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26178
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26178


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Upon returning to Harrodsburg, the men furiously attempted to finishing the pallisading, which they had typically let slide when their optimisim had begun to rise during the quiet winter. 3/7 the Indians appeared about sunrise and set fire to one of the cabins outside the fort. The men "sallied forth" and in the engagement four colonists were wounded, one (Archibald McNeal) dying 12 days later. Among the wounded were John Gass and Capt. McGary. Benjamin Linn "distinuguished himself in this affair by killing an Indian and securing his scalp at great risk of lofing his own by the adventure." (4B116-17)

File: 4B4.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:11:16 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26179
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26179


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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3/7 a party of Indians, probably a detachment from BLACKFISH 's band appeared before the fort and killed a negro at work in the fields, and wounded another person. This induced the scattered settlers to fort up at Boonesborough. DB took command. (4B117)

File: 4B4.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:12:35 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26180
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26180


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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During March the Indians "seemed to pay their especial respects to Harrodsburg." 3/18 killed and scalped Hugh Wilson within 1/2 mile of the fort. 3/28 attacked stragglers outside the fore, killing and scalping Garret Pendergrass within 100 yds while his family stood witness. Peter Flinn killed or captured. John Haggin missing -- later turned up at Boonesborough, then returned; "two weeks afterwards he returned, and carelessly entering his cabin, like one risen from the dead, coolly [sic] saluting his wife, as though specially had happened [?], 'How are you by this time, Nancy?'" (quoted on 4B119)

File: 4B4.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:13:23 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26181
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26181


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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KENTON saves DB:1 BOONESBOROUGH came in for its share of attention in late April. Thursday am 4/24 Daniel Goodman and another man left the fort to drive in some horses from a field 400 yds away. They were fired upon by 4 or 5 Indians; not wounded, they fled and were pursued to within 60 or 70 yds of the fort where an Indian overtook Goodman and killed him with his tomahawk and commenced taking his scalp. <By the time the Indian had secured this bloody trophy, Simon Kenton who with two others had been standing at the fort gate ready to start out on a hunt, ran to the relief of his friends, and when within a few yards of the bold scalper, shot the fellow down; and then Kenton, in company with his hunter-companions, gave chace [sic] to the others, pursuing them to the edge of the field.> (4B120, continued)

File: 4B4.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:14:31 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26182
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26182


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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KENTON saves DB:2 DB and 10-12 more men rushed out of the fort with their rifles and joined Kenton and other s in the lane, skirted with a field on either side. <The Indians, to the number of about one hundred, who were here secreted in the fence-corners, behind stumps and other hiding places, were completely succeeding [sic] in drawing the whites into a fatal ambuscade.> Kenton, looking to his left, saw an Indian drawing a bead and shot him dead. Kenton reloaded, DB and others came up, all heard a rush of footsteps on their left, and turning saw that a large number of Indians had cut off their retreat to the fort. <Seeing the perilous situation of himself and friends, Boone exclaimed, "Boys, we are gone -- let us sell our lives as dearly as we can!" -- and gave orders to charge through the Indians, which was quickly obeyed by first firing upon the enemy, and then beating down, with clubbed guns, all that stood in their way. The whites succeeded in their object, but they had to fight hard for it. Stephen Hancock killed an Indian, shooting him in the head. During the melee, Capt. Boone received a ball in his left ankle, which broke the bone, and threw him on the ground; and when the tomahawk was uplifted to despatch the fallen captain, Kenton, like an angel of mercy, came to his rescue, discharged the contents of his gun through the body of the Indian, when another warrior appearing, with kinfe in hand, to take Boone's scalp, Kenton clubbed his gun & knocked him down, and then ran with Boone in his arms to the fort. The women in the fortress were anxiously watching the issue of this sudden and exciting contest, and seeing her father approaching wounded, Jemima Boone rushed out fo the fort and met him several rods from the gate, and assisted him in.> (4B121, continued)

File: 4B4.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:15:06 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26183
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26183


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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KENTON saves DB:3 In addition to DB, the wounded included John Todd, Isaac Hite, and Michael Stoner, who had advanced some distance down the land ahead of the others, had raised his gun to fire at an Indian, and was shot through the right wrist. Unable to grasp his gun, he was shot again in the hip, laying him prostrate on the ground. An Indian ran up to him to take his scalp, but was shot dead by others just as he reached Stoner; another ran up and met the same fate. Stoner was helped up. <Our cool and considerate German snatched his gun from the ground, and presenting it to one of the men, said, "If I leave you, I vill leave my gun wid you; she be well loaded, and if you hold her on one of tem Got tam yellow rascals, I vill varrant you'll fetch him." William Bush, to aid his friend Stoner to hasten his retreat, caught him by the arm, or around the waist, as they were crossing the Lick branch, and the wounded soldier showing signs of becoming exhausted; but Stoner fearing that two together would make too prominent an object for the enemy's aim, desired Bush to let go of him, exclaiming, "O Pilly Push, dey vill schoot us; we are too pig a mark -- WE ARE TOO PIG A MARK, Pilly Push!" So Bush desisted, and shared, as he had done before, in checking the pursuit of the Indians, by every now & then suddenly stopping and presenting his rifle, which would set them to jumping and capering about most violently to prevent aim being taken at them; and in this way would they be momentarily checked, while the woulded men would gain a little distance, to be overtaken by their protectors.> At length they reached the fort. (4B123, continued)

File: 4B4.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:15:26 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26184
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26184


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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KENTON saves DB:4 The ball in DB's ankle was removed from the opposite to its entrance, it had been completely flattened. DB sent for Kenton: "Well, Simon, you have behaved like a man to-day; indeed you are a fine fellow." Indians continued hovering around the fort, burning deserted cabins. DB had a painful time with the ankle; placed in a swing as he lay in bed. No physician in the country; but frontiersmen were familiar with the treatment of wounds by poultices. Ever after DB suffered from the old injury with a change in the weather or with overexertion. (4B123-24, concluded)

File: 4B4.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:15:43 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26185
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26185


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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4/25 Indians heard around Harrodsburg imitating owls, turkies, and other game, but colonists not fooled by these enticements to come out and take game. On 4/29 Ensign Francis McConnell and James Ray were 100 yds south of the fort shooting at a mark; Indians shot and mortally wounded McConnell; Ray ran towards the rifleman, thinking there was only one, but was soon attacked by a large number, who shot at him but missed; he retreated to the fort, found the gate closed, and took refuge behind a stump several steps from the fort wall. Four some 4 hours he hid as the Indians fired at him, knocking up the earth around him. All the while his mother watched in horror from one of the port-holes. Finally Ray say, "For God's sake, dig a hole under the cabin wall and take me in!" This was quickly done. Towards evening, Silas Harlan, James Ray, and others opened the gated, raised the war whoop, and ran out to bring in the body of McConnell, who during the day had repeatedly waved his hand from behind the log where he had fallen; they were covered by several men from the roofs of the cabins. All this "caused the Indians to scamper away like so many partridges." McConnell died shortly after he was brought in. (4B124-25

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:44:41 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26186
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26186


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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5/1 census: Harrodsburg -- 84 men fit for duty; 4 unfit; 24 women; 12 children over ten; 58 under ten; 12 slaves over ten; 7 slaves under ten; total of 201. BOONESBOROUGH -- 22 men. Logan's Station -- 15 men. Total colonial men in KY 121; 50 families; population about 280. <To attempt to successfully to resist hordes of savages with such a mere handful of men, appeared indeed hopless odds; three isolated forts in the wilderness, two hundred miles from the nearest settlements in Virginia, to which imploring appeals for relief had been sent, but none came; their cattle were mostly killed, and horses stolen; no corn planted at Harrodsburg, the largest settlement, and wild meat difficult to be procured.> 5/18 Capt. MeGary and John Haggin sent express to Fort Pitt to learn of the prospects of peace and recover the stolen horses. (4B125-26)

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:45:27 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26187
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26187


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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About May, each fort chose scouts and spies; Clark pledged their salaries on the faith of VA. BOONESBOROUGH: Simon Kenton and Thomas Brooks, chosen by DB. Harrodsburg: Samuel Moore and Bates Collier chosen by Harrod. Logan's: John Kennedy, John Martin and John Courad chosen by Logan. These ranging men were generally able to detect the enemy and give timely notice; but when the Indians were in the neighborhood, there were too few scouts to keep pace with them. (4B126)

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:45:56 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26188
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26188


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Callaway and John Todd left for VA and legislature on morning of Friday May 23d. (4B127)

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:46:29 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26189
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26189


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Cornfield fight. DB divided the people at BOONESBOROUGH into two companies, alternating as guards and spies, or as farmers. On Friday 5/23, after Callaway and Todd had left for VA, as men worked the cornfield, a party of about 200 Indians appeared, first seen by a man in the fort who noticed the reflection of the sun on an Indian gun, gave the alarm and fired upon them. Greatly outnumbered, the men flew to the fort; Joseph Kennedy (17 yrs) badly wounded with three balls. Two others wounded in the subsequent fighting. Indians kept up a constant fire until 11 pm. Renewed the next morning and continued until midnight. Several times attempted to fire the fort. Michael Stoner, still recovering from his wound, was placed at the fort wall, and killed a warrior attempting to fire the fort; the Indian had a silver half moon on his breast at which Stoner took deadly aim. DB not yet recovered either, but he directed and encouraged the men, although Kenton, Stoner, and other experienced Indian fighters really needed none. Seven Indians kiled. Sunday morning 5/25 the Indians retired after having destroyed what cattle they could find.

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:46:57 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26190
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26190


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Joseph Kennedy, came to KY in spring of 76 at age of 16. Settled at BOONESBOROUGH. Wounded in the cornfield fight. Returned to NC in fall 77 and fought against the Tories. To KY again in spring 79 to Logan's where served as scout; to Vincennes to join Clark's campaign against Detroit. Ensign in Black's campaign against Shawanee. Returned to NC in 80; at foot of Cumberland mts his party was attacked; 3 companions killed, he taken captive. Taken to Augusta and there delivered to the British, but liberated by Col. Lee's capture of that post on 6/5/81. Next winter again in KY where appointed leiutenant and engaged as a ranger; with Logan burying the dead at Blue Licks; in autumn served in Clark's campaign against the Shawnees. 86 followed Clark again on his Wabash expedition. Rose to rank of major of militia. Member of the Convention of 92 from Madison county. Lived in that county until his death in 1844 at the age of 84 yrs. During the attack Wm Bailey Smith was let out of the fort by night and went to the Yadkin for relief. (4B128n)

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:47:34 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26191
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26191


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Indians continued to harrass BOONESBOROUGH after the cornfield fight. Party consisting of Squire Boone and others went out to engage the enemy on Monday 5/26. Advancing through some small glades se of fort, Squire lingering behind examining moccasin tracks, men on point called out "BOONE, COME ON!" Heard again from his side someone call out 'BOONE!", stopped, turned, and was shot in his left side, breaking one of his ribs in two places. Indians fled, they were probably few in number. [4B128]

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:48:23 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26192
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26192


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Logan's. Friday am May 30th. Mrs. Ann Logan, Mrs Whitley and a negro woman ventured out of the fort to milk the cows, guarded by William Hudson, Burr Harrison, John Kennedy, and James Craig; fired upon, Harrison shot through the head and killed instantly, Harrison shot down, Kennedy wounded with four balls but reached the fort with the women and Craig. 57 Indians. Kept up constant fire on the fort until eve from behind trees and banks; 12 uninjured men in garrison kept them from approaching too close. Conspicious defenders: Benjamin Logan, Wm Whitley, John Martin, Benjamin Pettit, James Craig, George Clark, Wm Manifee, Azariah Davis, James Mason, James Hawkins (free mulatto). Wives of Logan, Whitley, Clark, Pettit, and Manifee assisted with the rifles, the first two melting their pewter plates down for bullets. At the evening the defenders noticed that Harrison moved, was not dead; Logan "hallooed" to the wounded man, "If you are in your senses, move your foot." Harrison did so. Logan: "Lie still -- don't be discouraged, and I will bring you in at the risk of my life." Logan went out, rolling a bag of wool before him as protection against fire, until he reached the man, grasped in his arms and ran to the fort. Indians did not notice until he was almost in, then fired a single gun. (Harrison died on 6/13 of these wounds.) Indians resumed the attack, continued until the night. Killed all the cattle and hogs they could find. Kept around the fort til Sunday am, then departed. Before they did Logan ventured out again and brought in the body of Hudson, which was scalped and mangled. (4B129)

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:51:33 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26193
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26193


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John Kennedy, brother Joseph, came KY with DB company of roadmakers in spr 75. Wounded Logan's 5/77, recovered. JP of KY in 77, commanded a company on Clark's campaign against Shawnee in summer of 80. Killed with two others at foot of Cumberland mts, 12/24/80. (4B129[1]n)

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:54:32 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26194
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26194


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Attacks in May/77. <It is quite evident that the Indians attacked the three forts almost simultaneously, expressly to prevent their extended relief to each other.> (4B130)

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:55:12 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26195
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26195


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Logan went for VA relief on night of 6/6/77; traveled day and night until he accomplished his mission, returning on 6/23 with high hopes of the early arrival of men for defense. (4B131)

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:55:58 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26196
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26196


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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June 77: Daniel Lyons returning from Cumberland river was killed before Logan's fort. 6/3 express from Harrodsburg to BOONESBOROUGH discovered a large party of Indians. Barney Stagner, an old man, killed and beheaded mile and half from Harrodsburg, and same day guns fired at BOONESBOROUGH and cattle killed. Logan, returning from VA on 6/23, saw sign of about 30 Indians crossing Cumberland mts and headed for the stations. (4B131)

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:57:01 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26197
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26197


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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July 77: comparatively quiet month. <How indifferent people can become to danger, when killing, scalping, and beheading were things of frequent occurrance, may be inferred from the following entry in Clark's Diary -- "July 9th, Lieut. Linn married -- GREAT MERRIMENT." The bride was Hannah Soverens, and the wedding took place in Harrodsburg.> First wheat crop harvested at Harrodsburg in mid-July. 7/26 Hugh McGary returned from Fort Pitt, reported no prospect for peace or return of horses. (4B131-32)

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:57:27 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26198
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26198


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Relief: MeGary and Haggin had gone to Ft. Pitt, Smith to the Yadkin, Logan to Holston, Harrod had twice gone to meet the expected relief column: none. Isaac Shelby to Joseph Martin, 6/20/77 (from VA): "Boone was badly wounded, the people of Kentucky were penned up in forts." <The pressing wants of the main army under Washington, the poverty of the country, and the unsettled state of the western frontiers of Virginia and North Carolina, all conspired to retard the arrival of the long expected reinforcement. At lentgth Col. Bowman reached BOONESBOROUGH on the 1st of August to the great joy of the people, bringing with him two companies under Capt. Henry Pawling and John Dunkin, who was succeeded soon after his arrival by Isaac Ruddell, the two companies numbering one hundred men. He was ordered to protect the people of Kentucky, if his force was sufficient; if not to "escort them into some interior and secure parts of the country."> (this last quote citing Ms VA Archives, on 4B132)

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:58:18 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26199
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26199


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Harrodsburg, 8/5/77: 10-12 Indians secreted themselves near a turnip patch close to the fort, alarm given by the restless cattle. Clark with a number of men crept out, got to the Indians' rear and killed 4, wounded others, took plunder which sold for better than L70. (4B133)

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:59:01 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26200
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26200


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Harrodsburg, 8/11/77: John Higgins died of a lingering disease, the first natural death probably that occurred in KY. (see BOGART:125) (4B133)

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 3:59:26 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26201
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26201


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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8/25/77 six of Bowman's men nearly reached Logan's were waylaid and Ambrose Grayson killed, Jonas Manifee and Samuel Ingram wounded. Indians escaped leaving on Graysons body several proclamations from Gov. Hamilton of Detroit, addressed to Clark and Logan in particular and Kentuckians in general, offering pardon to all who would repair to the British standard with their arms and use them, promising them good fare, and at the close of the war two hundred acres of land to each man; and that all who held state commissions should have equal rank and be taken into the British pay. Logan kept these concealed from the people for many years, "lest the more thoughtless might perhaps, in a time of much public suffering and distress, be tempted from the path of rectitude and patriotism." (4B133)

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 4:02:11 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26202
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26202


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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9/2/77 first court for KY county convened at Harrodsburg. Named JP's: Clark, Isaac Hite, Benjamin Logan, Robert Todd, Richard Callaway, John Kennedy, Nathaniel Henderson, DB, James Cerchester, James Harrod, and others not named; first 4 appointed the previous December, the rest named in June to replace those appointed but never come to KY. Levi Todd appointed clerk of the court. Richard Callaway colonel of county in place of John Bowman, promoted to county Lieutenant made vacant by David Robinson not coming to KY. (4B134)

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 4:03:13 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26203
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26203


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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August. Indians constantly watched the roads connecting the stations; often seen by colonists; shots sometimes exchanged. Harrodsburg had not been able to grow corn, were carefully rationing what they had cribbed from the previous year. (4B135)

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 4:04:28 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26204
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26204


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Battle of Cove Spring. Sept. 9/11: party of 37 men under Bowman went from Harrodsburg to Josph Bowman's settlemtn at the Cove Spring, 5 miles southeast, to shell corn and bring it to the fort. While so engaged, party of Kickapoos stole through a canebrake and fired upon them; Bowman: "Stand your guard! We are able to beat them, by the Lord!" Squire Boone among the men. Had a small 3 edged sword which he had drawn half out of the scabbard for use in case. Upon first alarm he jumped behind a tree and shot at the Indians, then squatted in the weeds to reload; while reloading, Eli Gerrard, next to him, shot dead, body fell on SB. Indian who had shot ran up with tomahawk in hand to secure Gerrard's scalp, not knowing SB there. Both saw each other when only 10 feet apart. Indian exclaimed "WAUGH!" raised his tomahawk and slashed SB across the forehead two inches; blow was pratially broken, tomahawk knocked in some way from the Indian's grasp. SB had dropped his gun, thrust his sword into the Indian's abdomen with one hand, while with the other seized the Indian's belt and pulled him towards him, shoving the sword completely through his body, the point coming through some fourten inches. Indian made several attempts to draw SB's knife from the sheath attached to his shotpouch strap, but blood from SB's forehead falling upon the handle made it so slippery that he could not get a grip. Indian bagan to back off toward a low fence, SB still holding on till they reached the fence when he let go and the Indian threw himself over the fence, fell upon his back, and broke off the point of the sword, expired and died. Another Indian killed. Six colonists wounded beside SB; one died that night. Indians retreated. Clark came up with reinforcements and brought the wounded in. (4B135-36)

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 4:04:59 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26205
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26205


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Relief. Smith successful raising a company of 48 men among DB's old friends and kindred on the Yadkin. Some of them Boones, some Bryans. Enlisted to serve six months. Reached BOONESBOROUGH on 9/13. All mounted. Received with great joy. They rode in single file, sixteen feet apart; Indians who watched from the hill overlooking the fort reported that they amounted to fully 200 men. <The Indians were not only frequently deceived in this way, but were fond of exaggerating their exploits, & sometimes relating pure fictions and palming them off for truthful narratives.> (not clear where he gets this info on INDIANVIEWS, 4B137n)

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 4:05:51 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26206
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26206


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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With the arrival of reinforcements, the colonists tended to take the offensive; <Whenever a party of Indians were known to be in the country, they were sought for by the whites rather than avoided; and the Indians in the turnip-patch affair at Harrodsburg, at the Cove Spring engagement, and on other similar occasions, were boldly met, and "out-generaled," as Boone asserts, "in almost every battl;" and instead of denonimating the Virginians by the SOUBRIQUET of LONG-KNIVES, as they formerly done [sic], and whose superiority they now began to learn from sad experience, they now spoke of them as the CLOSE or SHARP SHOOTERS. The Indians were, in a great measure, disheartened, and were compelled to give up all hopes of taking any stations until they could greatly augment their dustky forces. The Kentuckians, on the other hand, were greatly elated with their little successes against their enemies, and the arrival of the military companies from Virginia and North Carolina; and Capt. Smith brought intelligence of one hudred and fifty more men on their march for Kenticy, and that Washington had defeated Howe -- and Clark adds, in his diary, of this latter item, "JOYFUL NEWS, IF TRUE!" Though it did prove incorrect, it goes to evince the warm sympathies of the backwoodsmen of Kentucky for the patriots, and the patriot cause, under the banner of the grea and good Washington. "Our affairs," declares Boone, "began to wear a new aspect, and the enemy, not daring to venture an open war, practiced secret mischief at times."> (4B138)

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 4:06:56 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26207
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26207


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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10/1/77: Clark left Harrodsburg for VA with 21 men, joined at Logan's by pawling and his company of 54 with some women and children. Assured his fellow KY that he was going to promote their highest interests and should early return. Others arrived. 10/2 Capt. John Montgomery reached Logan's with 38 men from Fort Chiswell WV; about 10/14 Capt Charles G. Watkins to BOONESBOROUGH with company of 50 men from Bedford county VA. Late autumn Logan went mounted alone to Holston, obtained four kets of powder and four lorse loads of lead for KY stations, safely returned with guard of 12 men. (4B139)

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 4:07:41 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26208
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26208


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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year 1777 constant anxiety and watchfulness in KY. Little corn raised at BOONESBOROUGH and Logan's, none at Harrodsburg. But year closed on prighter prospects with reinforcements. (4B139-40

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 4:09:46 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26209
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26209


1777-12-12

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Col. John Bowman to Gen. Hand (commander at Ft. Pitt) from Harrodsburg, 12/12/77: <Sir. -- We received yours by Mr. John Haggin, dated Fort Randolph, 19th November, 1777, which news gives great satisfaction to the poor Kentucky people, who have these twelve months past been confined to three forts, on which the Indians have made several fruitless attempts. They are left almost without horses sufficient to supply the stations, as we are olbliged to get all our provisions out of the woods. The Indians have burned all our corn they could find the past summer, as it was in cribs at different plantations some distance from the garrisons, and no horses on which to bring it in. At this time we have no more than two months bread -- near 200 women and children, and not able to send them to the inhabitants; many of those families of those families [sic] are left desolate widows with small children destitute of necessary clothing. <Necessity has obliged many of our young men to go to the Mo-non-go-hale, their former place of abode, for clothing, intending to join their respective companies as soon as possible; and as there will be a sufficient guard, I think it proper to order some corn to this place for our support. We intend to keep possession of the country, and plant crops the ensuing spring, s we have no other place from which to expect relief. If we are denied this request, we must do without bread till we can get it from what we intend to plant. I find it difficult to keep the garrisons plenty in meat, and if we have no bread we must at any rate suffer. <Your humb. serv't, <John Bowman.> (citing Hand Papers, quoted on 4B140-41)

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 4:13:30 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26210
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26210


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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In this year of scarcity because of Indian attacks and inability to work the fields: <In the fields where a crop had been raised the previous year, and where ears and kernels had fallen scatteringly upon the ground, many a bag-full was gathered which had grown spontaneously, and produced, in some instances, seven or eight barrels [bushels?] to the acre. This circumstance, or one like it, gave rise to the answer of Gen Charles Scott some years afterwards, when asked, upon his return from Kentucky, as to the productiveness of the country: "If planted," said he, "and cultivated as you Virginians do yours, twenty barrels [bushels?] would be an ordinary yield; if planted, and not cultivated, ten barrels [bushels?]; AND IF NOT PLANTED AT ALL, SEVEN BARRELS! [bushels?]" (citing ms statement of Willis A. Bush, derived from Daniel Bryan, quoted on 4B141-42)

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 4:15:36 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26211
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26211


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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With renewed stores of ammunition, hunting supplied most of the food for the stations. <Game was plainly dressed, and served up on wooden platters or pewter plates, with corn bread and hominy. Corn was then ground with great difficulty on the laborious hand-mills, or pounded in the cavity of a stump by means of a pestle attached to a sweep; for water and horse mills were then, & for some years afterwards, unknown in Kentucky. When the Indians were not too troublesome, cows were kept to some extent, and milk used for food & culinary purposes. The tallow and marrow from buffaloes were important articles in cooking; and parched corn pounded into meal, sweetened with maple sugar, furnished an admirable substitute for the most delicious coffee.> (4B142)

File: 4B5.DR1



    Created: 8/7/2017 4:17:39 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22299-26212
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22299-26212


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series B, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<Many of the young men, as already indicated, returned eash successive autumn to their original homes in the old settlements, to provide themselves with a new supply of clothing. Those who remained, had necessarily to rely upon the skins of wild beasts for rainment, together with the homely product of the wild nettle and buffalo wool. The wild prickly nettle is a plant of luxuriant growth in the rich lands of the West, attaining a heighth of three to four feet, with a bark fibre somewhat resembling that of flax and hemp, or rather of a character between the two; the stalk falls when touched with frost, and when the fibre matures or rots by the rains or snows it is separated from the stalk and spun. A coarse article of cloth was manufactured from it; and sometimes it was combined with the coarse wool or hair from the bufalo, the nettle being used as warp, and the buffalo wool as filling. For the manufacture of socks, buffalo wool alone was used, which wa quite soft