Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John Shane interview of Isaac Clinkenbeard, ca. 1843-49: <Ned Boone was killed on Boone's Cr. It was called Plumb-Lick, till N.B. was killed on it . . . then down below the forks it was changed to Boone's Cr.> 11CC4

File: 11CC1.DR1



    Created: 6/9/2017 12:49:05 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-23985
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-23985


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
John Shane interview of John Gass, son of David Gass, ca. 1843-49: <Fanny Calloway, the younger of the 2 daus:, laid away w. her paddle on the indn: that had run into the water waist deep to pull the canoe to shore. Whether more indns: than one went into the water, or not, I do not know. My cousin, Jon Guess [sic] stripped, and swam th river after the canoe. Right where the ferry is, was where Boon then lived, and where the girls started from [in other words, not in the big fort, but in the hollow]. And they were taken, from where the rocks set in, opposite to it. Betsy Calloway had high wooden heeled shoes; the indns: just cut these off. The girls blistered their hands by turning down bushes. I saw the blisters on their little fingers, where the bushes pinched them. They told the indsn: they were tired, and did it to help them along. The indns: had an old horse along, in co:, on whh: they set the girls to ride. The horse wo'd kick up & throw them off. The indns: wo'd then get on, and show them how to ride. The indns: kept on dry, poor land; where no trail co'd be made, and the men who pursued (John McMullen, Bush, and my f. were of the Co:) said if the girls hadn't broken these bushes, they co'dn't have kept the trail at all.> 11CC11-12

File: 11CC1.DR1



    Created: 6/9/2017 12:52:03 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-23986
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-23986


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John Shane interview of John Gass, son of David Gass, ca. 1843-49: <It was a sign indns: were about, when the cows stood in the head of the Land, and wo'dn't go out. One morning the cows stood in the head of the land, and Danl: Boone, Capt. Billy Bush, Michael Stoner, Simeon Kenton, w. others, 15 in all, started out, determined to see if there were indns: They had gone 150 or 200 yds. from the fort, when they looked back, and (as these 3 last mentioned certified) a [word?] indns: had jumped, or did jump, over into the land. Boon cried out, boys!, we have to fight. Sell your lives as dear as possible. Bush said he fired his gun twice before he got through, and had it loaded for a 3d. shot. As they went along, he got near enough to see the white of many an endns' eye. He just made right at them. The indns: wo'd always give away. Stoner was wounded in the hipe. Bush put his arms around Stoner, and was going to help him up a hill, over from a branch like [?]. Stoner cried out as Bush was pulling him up, O push! push! dont make so big a mark. The 2 was too big a lump to shoot at. Bush stopped to load, and had put the powder in the gun, & was holding the bullit in his mouth, when he discovered some indns: loading. He sd. he just thot, what a fool he was to be standing there alone. Stoner had hobbled on a wood ways. Bush accordgly started, and the indns: fired & knocked up the gravel and dirt, so that it made his legs bleed. He wore short breeches, and had nothing on, lower down. When he got to the fort, he was asked if he was wounded. He said he co'dn't tell. His legs smarted so, he co'dn't stand still long enought to see. This was the summer before my f. came to Bnsgh:> 11CC12

File: 11CC1.DR1



    Created: 6/9/2017 12:53:28 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-23987
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-23987


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Long Siege John Shane interview of John Gass, son of David Gass, ca. 1843-49, 1: <The 8th of Sept 1778, was the day the indns: came on the long attack. They treated 3 days, and then kept an incessant firing 9 days. The indns: came in 300 yards. Then Pompey came 1/2 way, & called for Boon. Boon went out & met him at the fence, as freely and readily as I wo'd go to the yard fence. They spread down a blanket, up at the head of the land, farther off from the fort. Boon sat down and they gathered round him. Every one in the fort was then sure that Boon was gone. Wm: Bailey Smith went out w. Boon the 2d time, to the indn: camp, dressed in British clothing, maccaroni-hat, w. an ostrich feather in it, &c. These said, there were still more commanders in the fort. Boon said he co'd discover, if he were went out again, he wo'd not get back. He saw it in the indns' eyes -- and so didn't go out a 3rd time.> continued 11CC12-14

File: 11CC1.DR1



    Created: 6/9/2017 12:56:15 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-23988
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-23988


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Long Siege John Shane interview of John Gass, son of David Gass, ca. 1843-49, 2: <Boon had run away from the indns: as they were gathering to come to Bnsbgh:. He had promised while a prisoner w. them, as the commander there, that he wo'd come w. them to Bnsbgh:, and give the place up. . . . Boon had promised, while w. the indns:, and when he heard they were coming, that he wo'd come w. them, and deliver up the fort. They understood him to be commander. But bef: they started, Boon ran away, & put the fort in an attitude of defense. When the indns: came, an interpreter, a negro fellow, named Pompey, came up and called for Boon. Boon went out, & they talked awhile, and then started &c. went up to the main body. The indns: now required of Boon, his promise. Boon pleaded, he had been gone so long, there were other officers in his place. He retd:, and a Major Smith, dressed up in a red scarlet coat, maccaroni hadt, w. an ostrich feather in it, went out w. Boon the 2nd time. The same conversation -- for substance -- then transpired, as at 1st. Boon said think that they wo'dn't be safe to go back any more; he saw that the indns: were getting angry. He now left it to the people, whether they wo'd go w. the indns: to Detroit, surrendering the fort, or whether they wo'd hold it out. (He wanted to be free from blame, sho'd: they hold on, and the indns: overcome them. Boon was blamed for this proposal; but he only meant to shake off responsibility: and in going out to make a treaty, he did it w. the intention of detaining till the soldiers came.) The idea of the treaty, was to detain the indns: as long as they co'd:, w. an expectation of help. Boon had come from them a few weeks before, knew of their intentions, & they had then sent on for help.> continued 11CC12-14

File: 11CC1.DR1



    Created: 6/9/2017 12:57:43 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-23989
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-23989


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Long Siege John Shane interview of John Gass, son of David Gass, ca. 1843-49, 3: <Edwd: & Bradley, Old John South, Maj. Wm. B. Smith, Danl Boon, & Squire Boon, were of those who went out. The indns: thought to draw them round the point that Blackfish was on. When they had concluded the treaty, Blackfish said he must go and let them know. He then addressed the indns. in a voice like old preacher Vardemder's. Neither Boone, nor any one else, understood what they said. He now came back to confirm the treaty. Told the whites they must not be alarmed; when they were very loving, they took as near the heart as they could. The indns. had been ambuscaded the night before and when the 1st man took hold, the signal guns fired and the others jumped to, and then the indns. poured a fire on the fort, to keep those in the fort from coming out to the rescue of those at the treaty. John South was the 1st to get away. He just pulled down his I. Danl. Boon got away the last. Squire Boon was wounded between the treaty-ground and the fort. When he started, an indn. was between him & the fort, who struck him in the back, between the shoulders, so as to leave a blood shot mark, the print of the face of the tomahawk. After this, the indns. shot of nights; and I don't believe there was one night that it didn't mist or rain. They shot arrows, w. powder in a little rag, and little punk. They set only one house on fire, the only shingle roofed house there was Col. Hendersons. (Col. H. was not there). It blazed about as big as a hat. The shingles on fire were knocked loose. WEre pinned on to wooden laths w. wooden pins. There was great firing, by the indns. till they got them off. A torch had been thrown up agt. the back door of one of the houses, one abot 1/2 way along. Capt. Holder was running fr. one of the bastions. He went in, and opened the door, and threw a bucket of water on the torch. It had blazed up as high as the top of the house, above the top of the door. Capt. Holder swore hard. Mrs. Calloway told him it wo'd be more becoming to pray than to sware. H. swore it was not time to pray then.> continued 11CC12-14

File: 11CC1.DR1



    Created: 6/9/2017 12:59:12 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-23990
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-23990


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Long Siege John Shane interview of John Gass, son of David Gass, ca. 1843-49, 4: <Tice Prock, a dutchman, on the 1st day of the siege, went out & crept under a bellows, in Squire Boon's smith-shop, which was between my father's house and Squire Boone's house. Mrs. Calloway took a brush and brought him out. Py sure, said he, I was not made for a fighter -- I was not made for a fighter. Squire Boon made a couple of swivels out of black gum, & banded them with iron, before the siege. In the trying of them, the shot of the one went 200 yards, & then into the bank. The swivel bursted. The other they kept till the siege, and fired one foggy morning. The indns. knew it wasn't a gun, and hollowed for them to "fire their damned swivel" Ambrose Coffee would get up on top of the block-house. My father counselled him not to, suspecting that the inds. were going to fire. 14 bullit holes were shot thro' his clothes, and yet his skin was not broke. Suppose they all fired at him. He just fell down. They, I suppose, thought they had killed him. He lived with my father. Pompey came to the place where they had dug into the bank, and put his head up 2 or 3 times. Some of the men shot, while others, set to watch, co'd see the bullit strike the water. Wm. Collins, a 1st rate marksman, held his gun cocked and waiting; and when Pompey put his head up again, he fired. That time, no splashing in the water was seen. Pompey was not heard of any more. When inquired for, they said he was gone hunting -- or NAPPOO -- i.e. asleep. No doubt many indns. were killed. Many pools of blood were afterwards seen, at the places at which the men had shot. The indians came in Sept; the river was low. From the 2d bank they could see down into the water, but not the water's edge under the 1st bank nor under the 1st bank. They knew the indians were digging, because they could see that the water was muddy, as well as from the threats the indians made. They didn't get the means of digging about Boonsborough. They brought them with them.> continued 11CC12-14

File: 11CC1.DR1



    Created: 6/9/2017 1:00:22 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-23991
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-23991


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Long Siege John Shane interview of John Gass, son of David Gass, ca. 1843-49, 5: <Boon said, the summer he was with the indians he dould hear from Boonesborough every week. They got within 10 feet of the fort wall when a great rain came, and washed it all in. Their threats -- they could hear them said "they would blow them all to hell that night, may be so." This made them in the fort fear there was some mischief brewing. They began to suspect, from the Canadians that were along, that they might be attempting to mine under the fort. They ran a ditch, 10 feet deep, on the inside of the fort. The miners had come so near, they could hear from this ditch inside of the fort, the sound of the strokes of whatever they were digging with. There was a heap of flax, that had been stacked out on the outside of the fort. The indians had taken that flax, and of scaley bark hickory, and wrapped them together, round poles, rails, &c. and it was generally believed it was their intention, when they had gotten near to the fort, to break a hole through the ground, and to set them poles and rails up against the bottom of the fort, & so to set the fort on fire, instead of flowing it up. The fort always remained in the place where it was 1st put. Was enlarged, but not built in another place. When besieged, they shot into it off both hills.> 11CC12-14

File: 11CC1.DR1



    Created: 6/9/2017 1:01:23 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-23992
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-23992


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John Shane interview of John Gass, son of David Gass, ca. 1843-49: Col. Richard Callaway and Pemberton Rollins killed. Col. Callaway <was the worst barbecued man I ever saw. Cut his head bones up. They stripped him stark naked, and rolled him in a mud-hole. It was thought Cajah Calloway was along. Some of the prisoners said he had threatened revenge on his uncle. Cajah was of those taken at the salt-making. His uncle had whipped him before he was taken. There was not a bone as big as your hand.> 11CC16

File: 11CC1.DR1



    Created: 6/9/2017 1:02:51 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-23993
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-23993


1833

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John Shane statement of Septimus Schull, grandson of Daniel Boone, written for his children, ca. 1833 [says of Jemima (d. 1829), dead "about 4 years": <When Col. Boone, with his associates, had mounted the most sommanding position of Kentucky and viewed the numerous herds of Buffaloes, Elk, & Deer, on the plains below, he observed to his comrades, to behold! (claiming the whole as their own) at the same time exclaiming, We are as rich as Boaz of old, having the cattle of a thousand hills.> 11CC51

File: 11CC1.DR1



    Created: 6/9/2017 1:05:55 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-23995
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-23995


1833

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John Shane statement of Septimus Schull, grandson of Daniel Boone, written for his children, ca. 1833: <The account in Flint's Life of Boone, of Boone's being taken, when in pursuit of the girls, is false. Also, his jumping a long stride by means of a grape vine, to avoid being trailed. Also, his conflict with a bear.> 11CC52

File: 11CC1.DR1



    Created: 6/9/2017 1:07:10 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-23996
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-23996


1833

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John Shane statement of Septimus Schull, grandson of Daniel Boone, written for his children, ca. 1833: <Edward and Danl. Boone, had gone down to the Blue Licks in pursuit of game (Buffaloe) which fatted earlier and better about the Blue Licks, where they could get salt, than elsewhere. They had loaded their horses, and were on their return, when they discovered some fresh indian sign. This caused Danl. repeatedly to decline Ned's proposition to stop and unload their packs. At length they came to a spot on Grassy Lick where the indigenous blue grass sprung up pretty fresh and here it was proposed that they should stop and let their horses graze; while Ed. watched and Danl. went down the Creek, designing to be back in time to go on. The Lick was a short distance below, and Danl. thought to see if there was any thing in it; expecting to be back by the time his horses were done grazing. As he went, he met & shot a bear. A party of indians had all this while been dogging the hunters; and were as close on them that they saw them part; and then themselves also divided; those behind agreeing not to fire on Ned (the one in view) till they heard the others shoot Danl. who had turned off. Before this could be affected, Danl. had met and shot the bear; which those remaining taking as the signal, they immediately fired on Ned. Shot 7 bullets through him. Danl. fled at once. The other party set a dog upon him, but he turned & shot the dog, and thus made his escape. The cane was very thick, so that the indians could not see him 6 feet. When he shot the dog, they were within 20 steps of him. Followed its yelpings. When it was killed they soon lost him.> 11CC52

File: 11CC1.DR1



    Created: 6/9/2017 1:09:20 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-23998
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-23998


1833

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John Shane statement of Septimus Schull, grandson of Daniel Boone, written for his children, ca. 1833: <Daniel Boone Jr. went to Mo. in 1795, called by a proclamation of the Spanish gov't., offering land -- 400 acres, &c., on condition of settlement. He retd, and went back again in 1798 or 1799. Then the old man, and the balance of the family moved out: the old man, Danl., removed from Greeupsburgh; the others of the family that were not with him, removed from Fayette, & met him at Louisville.> 11CC53

File: 11CC1.DR1



    Created: 6/9/2017 1:10:43 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-23999
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-23999


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Observations of John D. Shane, which he wrote were suggested by a conversation with Chilton Allen [?] in Winchester KY, whose view was that the Revolutionary War in the western country did not close before the Battle of Fallen Timbers and Wayne's Treaty of Greenville in 1795, an interesting idea. The war in the west was different in several respects: <All other colonies were within reach of succour & supplies. Kentucky was in the midst of an interminable wilderness. 5000 indians between the Ohio and the Lakes, regarded it as their hunting grounds. . . . And Kentucky actually took its root in its inherent resources, before it recd. any essential supply from abroad. Its 1st meat was killed in its forests. Its 1st grain was raised from its soil. Its 1st wealth was in its own lands. Its 1st salt, dried from its waters. And its 1st commerce, the exposition of its own produce.> During the Revolutionary era <Fool-brave was the instinct of the times. A spirit which imbued every member, in every class, of all ages & conditions in society.> 11CC53

File: 11CC1.DR1



    Created: 6/9/2017 1:12:23 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24000
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24000


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John Shane interview of Isaac Clinkenbeard, ca. 1843-49: Moluntha: <Another man & I took & brot him in. He patted on his briact [?] & sd "King." McGary asked if he was in the Bat: of the Blue Licks. M. sd. yes. MeG. then sd. "d--n you, I will show you Blue Lick play: and just thkd [tomahawked] him. I was within 3 or 4 steps, at the time. MeG. was broke of his commission for it. There was a young Indn: that had been taken & put into a cabin w. some squaw prisoners. Col. Kennedy, that lived at the crab-orchard, went in & knocked the young indn: down, and scalped him. I went & peeped in thro' the crack and saw the Indn: sitting up w. his scalp off.> 11CC3

File: 11CC1.DR1



    Created: 6/9/2017 1:12:31 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-23984
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-23984


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with William Clinkinbeard, ca: 1843-49: <John Kirk & we got 2 bushels of corn, & that had to do us till we raised. Hadn't corn at Boonesborough to do them. The women, the 1st spring we came out, would follow their cows to see what they ate, that they might know what greens to get. My wife & I had neither spoon, dish, knife, or any thing to do with, when we began life. Only I had a butcher knife. When old Mr. Strode went in, he left a little pot w. us, & when he came back, he brot out some more with him, & we gave him $4 & a french crown, for that we had, & glad to get it. The 1st dishes we had, were made by one Terry in the Station -- a turner. He turned dishes & bowles & being no hunter, exchanged them for meat & tallow to us hunters. A parcel of those dishes out of buckeye, new & shining, & set on some clap-boards in the corner of the cabin, I felt prouder of in those times, than I could be of any dishes to be had now.

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/9/2017 1:22:07 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24001
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24001


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with William Clinkinbeard, ca: 1843-49: <I carried chains thro' the Lower Blue Lick battle ground; & I never saw bones thicker in any place. Never buried nor nothing.> 11CC54

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/9/2017 1:24:07 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24002
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24002


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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or thereabouts John D. Shane interview with William Clinkinbeard, ca: 1843-49: <Pressly Anderson was barefooted & bare-legged -- rolled up his pantaloons. His wife was walking & carrying her child. They passed us pretty nigh every day. Yes, I expect a good deal more [came out] that year [1779?] than for the next 7. . . . Everybody coming to Ky. Could hardly get along the road for them. And all grand tories, pretty nigh. All from Carolina, tories. Had been treated so bad there, they had to run off or do worse.> 11CC55

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/9/2017 1:25:59 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24003
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24003


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Hard Winter John D. Shane interview with William Clinkinbeard, ca: 1843-49: <My brother & myself drove 2 cows out that died of that hard winter. Going through the cane & see cattle laying with their heads to their side, as if they were asleep -- just literally froze to death. Great many lost their cattle. A great country for turkeys -- & had like to have starved to death -- a heap! a heap! of them died. Greatest country for turkies I ever saw. Cane very binding, cattle needed to eat a great deal of salt when it could be had. Cane grew up in one season. When it went to seed, it all died down. Want of salt, too, I thought killed a good deal of stock the hard winter. . . . When we 1st came out, there were a great many paroquets in the country.> But not seen after that winter. 11CC60

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/9/2017 1:27:11 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24004
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24004


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with William Clinkinbeard, ca: 1843-49: <We picked up nettles in the spring to make the chain, & got buffalo wool in the spring for the filling. Made the buffalo wool into hats too. The buffalo wool was the longest in the spring & the longest we called best. Yearlings & 2 year olds always had the best wool on. 4 of us went out once & got 24; killed them & got all the wool off. They did destroy & waste them there -- at a mightly rate. If one wasn't young & fat, it was left, & they went on & killed another. Like with the cows. I thout they never would get it ouf of this country, when I came; but now it is scarce & a curiosity.> 11CC61

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/9/2017 1:28:26 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24005
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24005


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with William Clinkinbeard, ca: 1843-49; 1: The roads between the Indian towns on Big and Little Miami were the <Prettiest, levelest, straitest paths I ever saw. Could have been made no straiter. Level as this floor.> <Michael Cassidy was in my mess. Lost a horse somehow. Was along when the 3 [Indians] were killed. Came bacxk with his fingers all bloody. Had but off their fingers, & noses, & ear-bobs, to get their trinkets. Whites always scalped whenever they gould get a chance. . . . [a few unclear words] Had a whole handful of trinkets that he got. It is the nits the indian lice put on a body's hair that live again. They suppose they have come out of the garments they have boiled & washined so much & therefore are hard to kill: but it is the nits on the hair breeding.> [This a little unclear, but seems a cautionary tale about taking scalps.] continued

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/9/2017 1:30:14 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24006
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24006


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with William Clinkinbeard, ca: 1843-49; 2: They came & fired from the other side of the river on our hollow camp, after night. They also attacked our camp, on the side of the river it was on, one night. This white woman that we took, having been a long time among the indians. Didn't know her name, or her peoples. Looked as much like an indian for color & for dress as an indian herself. . . . When I saw Maj. Wales, he had this squaw behind, riding into Camp. Had been out & caught her. Not caught in the towns. Most splendid looking squaw I ever say. I suppose she had 1000 ornaments on her. Was all covered over with them. Had taken the frenchman with them to the Ohio river. There Clarke sent him back with word that they would give an indian prisoner for 2 whites in exchange. That old squaw said she had been a prisoner to the whites wseveral times. She had been fired on by the sentinels, 2 or 3 times, as she came in, but she kept right on. She came in right back of our tent where we lay. She was left at the towns. 'Twas said some of the men turned back & tomahawked her. When we got to the town, I went into a cabin & saw some dumpling they had been boiling, taken off, & in a tray. Warm yet smoking. I thout now I would have my belly full, but coundn't eat them. Whey wer made of corn & beans, with [word?] of meal in them, to make them stick together, & without any salt. A man wounded in that firing over the river. The river was [word?] low, & there was a [word?] way on the sand bar, in the river. Don't know of any but the 7 horses in the council house in '80, & not a horse in 1782. I think I got a steel [?], all I got. 2 men got a parcel of money up at that French store and as all were sworn to give up all they got, these sowed that money up in the pack of a saddle, & threw it in; & when it was sold -- bought it.> 11CC66

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 7:06:40 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24007
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24007


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with William Clinkinbeard, ca: 1843-49, 1: <There were orders for every man to go. When we got there, mouth of Licking, we got just 6 quarts of corn. Must parch, pound, bake, or do as we pleased with it, but that was what we were to get. Some old man, that couldn't eat it parched, dut down sapling to get the squard stump to make a hominy block of. They then spread their blankets over the stump and pounded their corn on it. We could have botten Buffalo meat & jerked it, had we thought we would have needed it, or Clark would not have supplied us. We were like a parcel of young pigs, just learnign to crack corn. Went crack! crack! all thro' the tents. When we got to the towns, there was a brother of John Rice's that ate 15 roasting ears in the field, before he cooked any or came out. So I was told. I did not see it. Not as big corn as ours. We would have suffered had it not been just in roasting ear time. Also got a few irish potatoes there. At now Ctr. [?] no cabin at all: just sapling cut down. A little place stockaded in. Sapling 10 feet long set on end. The boats were there; had to leave a guard over them, & some sick, till we returned. Went up to Old Chillicothe, on the Little Miami. Never saw such a nettle patch in my life, as we saw in a bottom on the way. Afterwards came to another bottom, where the indians had a sugar camp. Beautiful grove of sugar trees. . . . [a few words unclear] The indians had left the town. The tories at B's [Bryan's?] s[tation] furnished a man with provision & horses, & sent him on to the town to let them know we were coming. We passed his horse, or found it, at the mouth of Licking. When we came to Old Chillicothe, the indians had burnt it down all to some 2 or 3 cabins that were full of fur, and of deer skins. All the rest they had burned up except their council-house, which had 7 head of horses in it. Plenty of corn -- roasting ears. We let it be there till we came back. Every man then, that had a sword, or big knife, had to work. All wer engaged, some standing sentry, others at work round the big cornfield.> 11CC66 continued

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 7:08:51 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24008
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24008


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with John Rankins, ca. 1843-49: Came down the Ohio to KY in 1784, arriving at Limestone. <Boone had some improvements at that time at Limestone.> Went on to Boonesborough by way of the Blue Licks. <Never saw Daniel Boone, at that time, he had left Boonsborough, & I was a little boy & didn't go about much.> <The picketing of the fort was gone, but the cabins were occupied, and the bastion ends stood, made mostly of little round sugar tree logs. . . . The fear of indians about Boonesborough was done away before we got there.> 11CC81-82

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 7:13:32 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24010
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24010


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Matthew Anderson, ca. 1843-49: Ca. 1783: DB was living on Marble Creek with in son-in-law William Hayes. 11CC85-86

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 7:15:26 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24011
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24011


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with William Rich, ca. 1843-49: Came to KY 1793. <Daniel Boone made an entry, calling for a corner to begin 5 miles E. [?] of Lulbegrud. In proving the entry, he swore that the Oil Springs was known as Lulbegrud. 'Twas said he couldn't find the entry, and leaving his co: [?] made one, & dirtied [written over: rubbed] over the fresh marks so as to conceal the brand; that they found it out on him, & that that caused him to leave this country for Mo. This was after he had been to Red Stone [?]. He had made the entry for some one, & had been called upon to establish it. All Boone's entries were mighty vague.> 11CC87

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 7:17:29 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24012
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24012


1843

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview tith Major Jesse Daniel, ca. 1843: Came to KY in 1801. <The year after I came, I think it was, Boone proved an entry for John Poindexter, of Va., at a buffalo lick on Lulbegrud. My brother Veverly, got the 1/2 of it for attending to it. That was the 1st & last time I ever saw Boone. Mighty little land ever held under Boon. Boon's own settlement & preemption, that he held, was about a mile from here, now Schullsville (in Clarke).> 11CC93

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 7:20:45 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24013
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24013


1843

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Long Siege John D. Shane interview with Major Jesse Daniel, ca. 1843; 1: Came to KY in 1801. <Mrs. French['s] account . . . was that Boon never deserved any thing of the country. [Keziah Calloway married James French, perhaps at Boonesborough {12CC97}; perhaps this is the person referred to here.] Boone got to Boonesborough 3 or 4 days before Hancock and never told of the Indians. Hancock got there, to the river, so nearly exhausted, he could scarcely call to make them hear to bring him over. As soon as he got over, he enquired if Boon had arrived. They told him he had. He then enquired if he had told them the indians were coming to attack them. Boon said no. Hancock wanted to know the reason, telling them that the indians would be on them almost immediately. Boone excused himself by saying, they would be taken anyhow, and that they might as well be taken by surprise as any other way. 'Twas said also -- Boone actually wanted to surrender, when they did come. But Col. Richard Calloway refused, saying he would never consent for his family to go into captivity among the indians. Hancock's family was there, and he also was wholly unwilling to surrender.> continued

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 7:22:23 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24014
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24014


1843

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Major Jesse Daniel, ca. 1843; 2: <Gen. Samuel South & I have talked about those times, and he never mentioned any thing of this kind. Said he was then a boy, & carried water for them at the treaty. The treaty was in reach of the fort. Was an evidence of boldness & firmness -- showed they were not easily scared. Went out with a determination not to surrender the fort. It was rather a mark of bravery. It was the nature of Boon, however, to be fool-hardy. The men were under fear. The case was a desperate one. The indians proposed a treaty and they went out under stiupulations. They were willing to risk the getting of a treaty, and to get it thro' any means, if it could be gotten. Men under fear are willing to do any thing if there is a prospect of relief, and desperate cases produce desperate remedies. 1/2 of the men too, willing to surrender, & the other 1/2 ready to fight, and rather die. They could only suspect the treachery of the indians, and against that suspicion, as the result proved, they did well provide. What a reproach would it justly have been had they been all cut off that in desperate circumstances they refused to make a treaty, simply because a little danger was apparent. And how completely were all the hopes of the enemy of taking the fort dashed when they left the rules of regular warfare, basily & treacherously breaking an honorable compact, in defiance of honour & right, and yet were unable to injure their foe. Surely such an enemy, that needed such means, need not be dreaded, after it had resorted to them, & failed in them. And how nobly do the forters & besiegers contrast, the one discretely fearing the superior force of a powerful enemy in a distant wilderness, and yet bravely relying upon the rules of honorable warfare, and willing to trust their fortune to it; the other meanly & pusilanimously seeking treacherous methods, altho' by superiority of force, one well directed attack might have stormed the fort.> 11CC94

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 7:30:46 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24015
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24015


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Daniel Spohr, ca 1843-49, in KY by late 1770s: <I heard Boone say myself, the first time the Indians took him prisoner, they took all his skins and furs, and let him go.> 11CC110

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 7:32:14 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24016
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24016


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Ephraim Sowdusky, ca. 1843-49: His uncles James and Anthony Sowdusky were in KY as early as 1773. <Andrew Sowdusky was saved at the Blue Lick Defeat by Boone's son's death. He got young Boone's horse, and came off. Just as Sowdusky was starting, he heard a man begging him to take him up, for God's sake not to leave him. When he had gotten him up, and come on to Licking, just as his horse jumped down the bank, 7 bullits were fired into his clothes, and only one grained the skin. He was run down . . . and couldn't run any further. Just reached his hand out, as he walked along, and caught the bridle. The indians were in sight. Boone;s being killed, saved him. He had gone to get his horse, where he was hitched, and 2 indians were there untying him. He thot his horse had been wounded, he stood so long, when he jupmed down. When the army reached the Blue Licks, they saw 3 indians passing up the opposite bank, smoking their pipes. When the indians were seen to be encamped a council of the officers -- Trigg, Todd, & McGary, was held. Boon's opinion was asked. He asid as a private man, he could go where any man could. But as an officer, his advice was not to act. He didn't think it was prudent. McGary said, the greater the danger, the greater the glory: any man that was not a coward to follow him.> 11CC143

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 7:34:35 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24017
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24017


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Ephraim Sowdusky, ca. 1843-49: His uncles James and Anthony Sowdusky were in KY as early as 1773. <They scraped down corn in Ky. and made bread before they started. The season was remarkably forward.> <The army took the village, cut up their corn, destroyed their towns, and came back w. about 18 only lost. The battle was on the 1st of August. When Clark came in sight, the indians appeared calm and composed, walking or standing about in perfect order.> 11CC144

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 7:37:07 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24018
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24018


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Mrs. John Morrison, ca. 1843-49; father came to Harrodsburg in 1779: <The indians stood at the last Pickway battle till they were powder burnt.> 11CC153

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 7:48:44 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24019
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24019


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Mrs. John Morrison, ca. 1843-49; father came to Harrodsburg in 1779: <Col Boon was there, and had a son killed. Col. Boon was asked if he knew it. He said yes, he fell by his own side.> 11CC153

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 7:49:24 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24020
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24020


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Mrs. Shauklin, ca. 1843-49: Her father, Robert Shaulkin [did she marry a man of the same name?], was in KY 1774. <My father said, when he was 1st in Ky., there were but 4 women in Ky., and they were at Harrodsbourg: Mrs. Denton, Mrs. McGary, Mrs Ashby, and Mrs. Harrod. There were just enough for 2 four handed reels: and part of the men would guard at one time, and part at another, while the rest alternately danced.> 11CC219

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 7:50:33 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24021
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24021


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Mrs. Samuel Scott, ca. 1843-49: With her father (John McCorkle), mother and family, forted on the Clinch during this war. <One summer . . . (I don't know where Daniel Boone himself was) Daniel Boone;s wife and 2 daughters were at Moore's station. The men had gotten very careless, and while the guards were out, they would all go out and play at ball, and those that were not playing, would go out and lie down, without their guns. This time, only old daddy Thompson was left in the Fort. And Mrs. Boone & her 2 daughters, and Miss Hannah Barr, and 2 or 3 others, determined to load their guns light, like Indian guns, some half dozen, and go out the other side of the Fort from the men, and fire them off as rapid as they could. They then ren in and slammed the 2 gates too, so that no one could or did get in, but one Ben Smith, a young man who jumped over and got his gun. Some were in so great haste, they run right through the pond. They were all exceeding mad, and wanted, some of them, to have the women whipped, and the men had like to have got to fighting among themselves. Had 2 or 3 fights. This quarrel did not grow out of whiskey, for they had none.> 11CC225-226

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 7:52:59 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24022
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24022


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with John Lowens, ca. 1843-49: In 1798 he <stopped at the mouth of Big Sandy. Boone was in a cabin, 200 or 300 yards from the Ohio, Virginia side. Ate the first bear meat I ever had there. Boone's children were all gone then, and he and his wife were alone. About 2 years after he moved to Mo.> 11CC227

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 7:58:58 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24024
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24024


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with John Lowens, ca. 1843-49: In 1787 his father and family settled about 12 miles from Boone's Station. <Young Daniel [Morgan Boone] came to my father's singing school, a year or two after he [my father] came. Think they moved to Limestone, before going to Sandy. He [DMB] and John Taylor . . . came together. McNitt was the teacher.> 11CC227

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 8:01:06 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24025
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24025


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Ben Guthrie, ca. 1843-49: <In April, 1784, Col. Robt. Johnson went out surveying in Fleming County. Daniel Boon was pilot. Crossed at the Upper Blue Licks, where we saw 600 buffaloes. Danl. Boon, & Col., the Capt. Johnson, stood by the river and counted 300 that we (4 or 5 of us) drove over to see them swim the river. And they thought was many were left behind on this side yet. Danl. Boon knew where we were to begin.> 11CC255

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 8:02:37 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24026
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24026


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Jacob Swigert, ca. 1843-49: He was one of the men who brought back DB's remains from MO. <They found the grave about 4 miles back in the country, from a town on the north-bank of the Mo. river. There were 30 or 40 persons standing around, who indentified the grave of Boone, where they got his body. The place of his burial was well known.> 11CC289

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 8:04:59 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24027
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24027


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with John Rankins, ca. 1843-49: <The fear of Indians about Boonesborough was done away before we got there. [1784]> 11CC81-83

File: 11CC3.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 8:20:06 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24028
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24028


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with John Rankins, ca. 1843-49: <In the fall of 1784, moved down & settled at the mouth of Boon's Creek, about 4 miles from Boone's Station, Cross-plains. Never saw Daniel Boone; at that time, he had left Boonesborough, & I was but a boy & didn't go about much.> 11CC81-83

File: 11CC3.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 8:20:43 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24029
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24029


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with John Rankins, ca. 1843-49: About 1786, in Bourbon County, on the Maysville Road beyond Bryant's, near Grant's Station. John Saunders' daughter attacked and scalped while walking home. She lived a whole day afterward. That day Tim Peyton and James Starks had been to Lexington. <Peyton was a very wild, rattling, drinking sort of fellow. Had bought a fine bay horse at Lexington. Coming home, he would whoop and hallow, and ride away from Starks, out of sight, and then wait till he came up. They lived in the same neighborhood. I knew Peyton well. The last time he rode on, (was after he had crossed Daviess' fork,) Starks heard the gun fire. The Indians were gone. It was within about a mile of Grant's Station. They had hid in some low cane, about as high as a man's breast, behind a large black walnut, and as Peyton came riding along, had shot him through -- the ball entering his left side, just in front of his arm. Grazed his arm, didn't knock him off his horse. He still rode on to where was a pole bridge, about a half mile. Here his horse jumping the bridge, Peyton fell off. Starks came riding up, and enquired, "why Peyton, what are you doing?" "Ah," said Peyton, "the damned Indians have killed me at last." They had wounded him once or twice before. Starks got down and stayed with him till he died. It was a distressing time.> 11CC81-83

File: 11CC3.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 8:24:56 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24031
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24031


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with John Rankins, ca. 1843-49: A group from Harrod's Station, including an Irishman, went out hunting [could be in 1786]. <Rain setting in in the evening, they took into a cabin. There was a loft in the cabin, made by placing clapboards over the joice. In this dark place our hunters concealed themselves for safety. . . . After they had quietly secured themselves, seven Indians stepped in below, set down their guns, and kindled a fire, and were seated round the hearth, drying themselves. Our Irishman kept stretching his head forward to see, and the hunters pulling him back. At length the clapboards becoming displaced, lost their proper position, and yielded to the superincumbent weight. "Come on, by Jesus," said the Irishman, as he tumbled through, "come on, boys, by Jesus we've got them." The panic struck Indians waited no longer the event, then they could find the passageway, and make their exit from the house, leaving their firearms, and everything not connected with their persons. The hunters immediately descended, gathered up the booty and made their way to the fort.> 11CC81-83

File: 11CC3.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 8:26:14 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24032
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24032


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with John Rankins, ca. 1843-49: <Rankins being a swearing man, he noticed my leaving out the swearing. . . (I read it over to him after it was written out, and wouldn't repeat that). He thought I ought to have put that in. But as men supply the smaller cirs: [?] of a narrative, in order to make it that consistent whole which it should be; and that according to their conceptions; so habitual swearers think no sentence smooth and euphonious, which is not filled up in their style. One such could not rehearse a story without in this respect doing it (in his view) justice; and for the same reason, he would never like to hear it rehearsed, without these necessary ornaments. Hence there is as great a likelihood that profane expressions are spurious parts of the narrative as that they are real, which is the first reason for not using such language. Second, they have no meaning in them, and their omission therefore cannot affect the sense. Third, they have no force in them, and their omission, therefore, does not lessen the beauty of language. Fourth, while the omission of expressions, often of doubtful authority, does no positive injustice in their introduction is certainly repugnant to good taste, and renders the narrative obnoxious to persons of refined and Christian feeling.> 11CC81-83

File: 11CC3.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 8:27:15 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24033
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24033


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with John Rankins, ca. 1843-49: <John Taylor, Joe, Berry, myself, and a black boy came into the Indian oldfields the year we were at Boonesborough [1784], with horses, hunting. Camped in a bottom, Indian oldfield -- on Howard's upper creek. Next morning we went along, very early, taking along by this lick, ever since known as Taylor's. Nothing was there. We took a circuit of about 2 miles & came around, and camped where was a couple of forks, and a ridge pole. John Taylor went again to the Lick. There were 5 or 6 deer in it. He had raised his gun, & was just about to draw trigger, when another gun fired. The Indians came down to the Lick, and seeing where the horses had been along, raised his charger, and give a whistle. Four other Indians immediately came up. They set off on a dog trot, and as soon as they got out of sight, Taylor pushed for his camp, called "Indians, Indians," and they cut loose the hobbles of his horse so hard, he fell back. They then put off without any explanation till they were on the way. The first place we came to was Bush's Station. We had a thought of waylaying our trail, but there were five of them, and only two of us that had guns, and two boys to be exposed.> 11CC81-83

File: 11CC3.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 8:59:29 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24030
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24030


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Samuel Treble, ca. 1840s; his older sister married Michael Stoner: <Michael Stoner and myself were out hunting. Stoner had an idea that I couldn't shoot. We had both gotten down & shot at some game, but he got the 1st shot & then tantalized me with offering to shoot. I determined to shoot the 1st thing I could that we met with. Stoner was an indifferent hand to shoot at a mark; I could beat him. But at game, he was the best man in Ky. Seemed to understand the motions of living animals. Stoner was apparently of a clumsy make -- but few men were really more active. We had goten down & I was loading my gun, having shot at some turkeys. Stoner shot after me, & also missed. While I was loading, he got thro' 1st and shot & killed the turkey before I got ready to fire: just as I was in the act of pulling trigger -- & before I could recall it. It was a rule in the woods never both to shoot at a time -- for fear of indians. We had gotten our load, I horsed, as much as we could ride on, & the other could carry, & were on our way back. I saw some 3 fawns & deer lying off to the right as I was going along a little piece before SToner, and I jumped down & shot one, unnoticed by him. He was very much alarmed, had turned deadly pale when I saw him, sprang down & treed in an instant, & called to me 3 times to know if I was hurt. When he found it was I that had shot & not that I was shot off from my horse, when he had gotten on a piece he asked me if I had killed it. I sd. yes, that I had seen the others run off, but it made 2 or 3 jumps only & then tumbled down in the grass. He proposed we should go back for it. I told him no, the skin was all we could get -- we had as much meat as we could carry & that wasn't worth going back after. When we lay there camped, that night, something came up towards the fire. It stamped, and then stood. Stoner's dog, would pop his nose against his master or utter a low growl, every time it stepped. I got on the dark side of the tree to watch its motions. It was a deer. Next morning I went out to a tree top, and had like to have sat down on the deer. It had been blazed by the fire, and coundn't get away, & laid down there. I learned after this, always to shoot 1st, if I got a chance.> 112CC43

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:16:18 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24058
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24058


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Samuel Treble, ca. 1840s: <Wm. Hays married Mima [Susannah] Boone, Col. D.B.'s daughter. A James Davis, now yet living on Luter, in Calloway County, Mo., married . . . Wm's daughter, and killed his father in law, out there, in a drunken Spree. Hays ran into the woods, Davis said ["]ah, you needn't run, all the trees in the woods shan't save you.["] Hays treed, & Davis ran close up to him and shot him.> 12CC44

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:18:20 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24059
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24059


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Mrs. Sarah Graham, ca. 1840s: Hugh McGary <married Matthias Yocum's oldest daughter Caty for his 2d wife. It was said he would go to see her, 2 miles off, while his 1st wife, who had been a widow Ray, mother of General Ray, lay sick: and that one of the boys -- Rays, as it was thought, used to stop him in the road, back and forth, and appear to him as a spectre, wrapped up in sheets, and talk to him of it, in the spirit of his present wife. (It was said the widow Ray could manage McGary where a whole army couldn't do it.) After he married her, whe would tongue him when she got in one of her tandrums. He would watch, sometimes 1/2 day, trying to slip round her; if he got a fair catch on her, he would hold her, till he got weary -- and say to her ["]O Caty! ain't you most done, I'm so tired["], but still continued his hold, till she would submit. "I've said all I want to say," or "I feel right easy," & then he would let her go. Her brother Jesse Yocum, before the battle of the Blue-Licks, would fall out with his father, tree him, & tell him now to shoot his d----d gourd. Were both behind trees.> 12CC45

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:20:04 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24060
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24060


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Mrs. Sarah Graham, ca. 1840s: <Jesse Yocum said he did not know how many they buried, but the smell of a human was the awfullest smell he ever had in his life. Logan went with a company to bury the dead: orders were for every man that could carry a gun to go help bury the dead. My father Charles Spillman was along. . . . When they got there, my father said they couldn't tell one man from another . . . . The weather being so warm they had swollen so much. He had thought he would be afraid in battle, but when he saw the dead bodies it made him feel like fighting. Such was the panic this bloody tragedy cast over the community, Lawrence offered my father the whole 1400 acres of his pre-emption, where Lawrence's Station was, for one little black horse to carry his family back to Va., exclaiming, that after all their toil, they had to lose the whole country. The day of that battle, the sky, the women's clothes, everything they had on, looked red.> 12CC50

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:20:58 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24061
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24061


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with James Lane, ca. 1840s: <The [KY] Legislature passed an act, exempting Danl. Boon from an attachment for one year: that he might go & show the beginnings of surveys that he had sold; and then he had to leave the state. Had been extravagent & gotten into devt, so that he couldn't stay. 2 years after I 1st came to Ky. [1792], I passed down the Ohio & found him at the mouth of the Kenhawa [sic], and spent a night at his cabin. It was warm; Boon had some bear meat hanging in his cabin, which dripped grease in my face that night as I lay there.> 12CC56-57

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:22:39 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24062
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24062


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with William Sudduth, ca. 1840s: Came to KY via Ohio and Limestone 1783. <Boone could write a good strong farmer's hand. Was deputy surveyor to Col. Thos. marshall, in 82, 3,4,5. And deputy under me, in 97. Made several surveys. Came to my house & staid all night several nights, and made out his plots, so that I know that he did it himself. Surveyed some 100,000 acres of land. Boone was in Logan's campaign of 1780. Had his family in a little cabin, just below Maysville. There was then but a 1/2 doz. families in Maysville.> 12CC63

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:24:13 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24063
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24063


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with William Sudduth, ca. 1840s: <Filson, I think, was at Strodes S[tation] while I was there [1783-84]. Was making out a map, & surveying some on the Ohio, at the time. Understood that he measured the Ohio from Pittsburgh to the Falls.> 12CC63

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:25:26 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24064
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24064


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Josiah Collins, ca. 1840s: Came to Boonesborough as an enlisted three-month militia man while DB in captivity. <When we came to Boonesborough, March 26th, 1778, we found a poor, distressed, 1/2 naked, 1/2 starved people; daily surrounded by the savage, which made it so dangerous, the hunters were afraid to go out to get Buffaloe meat. About 80 of us in Company had come in together [margin: our pay was 40/5 per month. Col. John Donaldson (Genl. Jackson's father in law) and Col. Dillard, were of the Company. They both claimed the Capt's place. Both had listed men.] In less than 2 weeks, one of our Company, James Kelly, was killed & scalped by the Indians, about a mile from the Ft. The pressing necessity of our wants, compelled us to trespass on some fat hogs which ran about int he Fort, to the great dissatisfaction of their owners (we had nothing to pay with) which we boiled and ate without bread or salt. After that, John martin, a celebrated hunter, took some of our men, and bark canoes, & went up the Ky. & killed and laid in a quantity of Buffaloe meat, and bro't it down. We then had to barbecue the meat, to preserve it, as we had not salt. When that was exhausted, Lieut. Hutchings shot down a large steer of Col. Calloway's, one morning, for the use of the soldiers. . . . Col. C., exasperated, swore that if any man killed another head of his stock, that he would shoot him. Dapt. Davy Guess [Gass] who lived in the Ft. gave leave to go up Otter Creek & hunt up his hogs, & bring them in for provision. I was one of 6 men, that went. We killed and bro't in 5 fine ones, and likewise ate them, as we had done all the other meat, without bread or salt. In this way we lived, getting little by little (of provisions) out of the woods. . . . Part of our Company mutinized, & went in with Col. Donaldson and Mrs. Boone, before we were ordered to march to the falls [by Clark]. [margin: Donaldson gave up to Dillard {in their dispute over who was in command} & went back home.]> <Somewhere about the 1st of May, Mrs. Danl. Boone, supposing her husband dead, retired with her family from Boonesborough to Carolina, in company with Col. Donaldson, through the Wilderness.> 12CC67,64

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:27:28 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24065
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24065


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Josiah Collins, ca. 1840s; Was with the Bowman campaign in 1779; 1: Surrounded Chillicothe. <An Indian man came running out of town with a gun on his shoulder, as tho' he was going out hunting. One of our party, Hugh Ross, shot that indian down. The crack of the gun alarmed the indian town. (I was close to Ross when he shot the indian.) The indians immediately came out of their huts, and gave us battle. They then attempted to make their escape from the other side of the town; but met with Capt. Logan, who gave them a heavy fire, which compelled the indians to retreat to the centre of the town, where they had some log cabins in which they took shelter. They then kept up a constant & severe fire, from each (either) side of those cabins, for the space of 4 hours. They next then sent out a negro woman to inform us that there were an hundred warriors in town, & that they had sent a runner to Pickway, for an hundred more. Col. Bowman & his officers thot it most suitable to move from the town to the woods, as the town stood in an open plain. This they accordingly did. They then proceeded on homeward, leaving 7 dead on the ground. About one o'clock, the Indians pursued and overtook us, in the woods. Col. Bowman formed his men into a circle round, and defended the baggage and plunder. The Indians came up and attacked us covertly, behind trees. There would be intervals, perhaps of an hour, in which we would hear no Indians. Then they would commence firing again, & so continued till the sun was about an hour and an half high in the evening. There was not, after that, an indian to be seen or heard, until almost sunset, when Col. Bowman formed his men to march from the ground. The Indians then again renewed a severe attack. We then rushed on them, and drove them off of the ground, without the loss of a man. (But I run over a dead indian, I know myself as we pursued.) We, after that, neither saw nor heard of them any more. We lost one man in the woods, and gained one scalp. Total loss, on our part 9 killed and 4 wounded. A young man, a prisoner then, told me in 1789, at the falls of the Ohio, that about 40 were killed, and died of their wounds, on the part of the Indians. We was then living at the old Chillicothe town. Was exchanged in 1783 for some squaw prisoners that we took in 1782. Blackfish was among the Indians who died of their wounds. . . . [I] got 2 scalps, the one Ross killed, and the one I ran over.> 12CC65-66 continued

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:28:37 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24066
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24066


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Josiah Collins, ca. 1840s; Was with the Bowman campaign in 1779; 2: <We then came to the Ohio, and crossed at the mouth of the Little Miami, bringing with us 163 horses, besides some other plunder, gotten from a trader's store, which was broken up, &c. Got one squaws gown, in which were 1100 silver broaches. After we had crossed the Ohio, right on the river bank, on this side, the plunder was divided equally among officers and soldiers, according to the agreement under which we had volunteered. We were 2 days there before we got it figured. . . . My brother & myself got a small mare, a yearling colt, and a 3 yr. old mare; but this amounted to L15 more than our share, which we never paid in the world. I swapped the yearling colt for one that we had gotten from the Indians which they had taken from Capt. Hart at Boonesborough the year before. I took him on to Va., and bro't him back, and sold him at Bryant's S[tation] in the summer 1780 to a tory named Lambert, who heard that Cornwallis had taken Charleston, & wanted to go back to Carolina again. Bargained a cow, & 2 pots, & ankilet. The horse kicked and nearly lamed Lambert, which furnished a great joke. Samuel McMullen rode one of the mares, so that she fell, and I had to kill her. The other mare, that fall, the Indians stole back again.> 12CC66

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:30:25 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24067
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24067


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Josiah Collins, ca. 1840s: <The emigrants from the East were so numerous, the winter of 1778-79, that they soon consumed what corn they had. The same sort of living was had, the next summer: buffaloe meat only without breat or salt. The corn raised being consumed in 1779-80 as before, the summer of 1780 was also passed on Buffaloe meat, as before. Hitherto the women couldn't get along. About 10 or 11 months after the corn of 1780 came in, that is in 1781, the women began to breed pretty fast.> 12CC68

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:34:18 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24068
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24068


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Josiah Collins, ca. 1840s: <In the summer of 1780 I was sent express from Col. Todd to Col. Bowman, on the other side of the KY. River; and with me was sent Thornton Farrow. The express was something respecting the raising of troops for the contemplated expedition under Genl. Clark. We came to the Ky, River late in the evening. We there met Col. Boone, & old Peter Schull (his son in law, Joe's father) who had just crossed in the canoe. We lodged that night in company with them, on the bank of the river.> 12CC68

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:35:27 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24069
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24069


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Josiah Collins, ca. 1840s; 1: <The men crossed the Ohio at the mouth of Licking . . . & went to within 4 or 5 miles of the indian towns undiscovered. . . . The whole army, consisting of nearly 1200, was then hurried on to a trot. Maj. Wells pursued into the towns, & took 8 prisoners. The indian warriors, being at that time few in number evacuated the town without the firing of a gun. The town taken possession of, was Chillicothe, on the Big Miami. Maj. McGary immediately marched with 500 men to McKee's town the indian agent. The indians there, had gotten information before he got in. A white man (John Holley, who had been taken from Boonesborough 4 or 5 years before [1778]) & a little negro boy, & plundered & destroyed the town. Maj. Morrison & Hugh Martin, being a little out, met with Mrs McFall, a white woman prisoner, riding on a horse, with a bag of taughsemenoune [sic] under her (roasting ears dried in a dettle so that they can get it off of the cobs -- put it in water, boil it, as good as roasting ears) & 2 squaws walking. The ladies (we may call them) were frightened at the sight of the white men. She rode off. Morrison shot & creesed [sic] the horse, & she was thrown & Morrison took her, & brot her back on the horse with the corn. Martin pursued & caught one of the squaws, & the other one escaped into the swamp.> 12CC71 continued

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:36:48 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24070
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24070


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Josiah Collins, ca. 1840s; 2: <The next day, 80 men of us, were sent on horse back to the town where Mrs. McFall had resided. The indians before we got there, had evacuated, and taken from the town every thing but a few bags of taughsemenoune. In our absence from the army, the indians appeared on the opposite side of the River from the town, & shook their tomahawks. The nest day, Capt. McCracken, one of the horsemen, turned out his horse to browse, & he went outside of the lines. He pursued his horse in the enening to hunt him up. He himself had gotten outside of the ines, and called to a sentinel to know if he had seen any thing of a black horse. A man behind some large fallen timbers cried here, come here is your horse. McC. turned quick, & wheeled quick to run from him, and the man fired and struck him in the arm. It was supposed the bullet was poisoned,, The arm mortified, and we buried him the 5th day. Brot 8 squaws home to the falls of the Ohio.> 12CC71

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:37:28 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24071
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24071


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Josiah Collins, ca. 1840s: <Boone's Filson was written by Humphrey Marshall. Boone lived at that time at the cross-plains, 10 miles from Lexington. Gen. Callamees [?] and I had a conversation about some statements in that, & he said H. Marshall was to blame about that, & that he ought not to have written it. It was always understood that H. M. wrote Boone's statement as published by Filson.> 12CC73-74

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:38:23 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24072
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24072


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Josiah Collins, ca. 1840s: <Col. Daniel Boone didn't exceed 5 ft. 10 inches. Very well set, well made man, to that. Hair, reddish sandy. Complexion, fair. High fore-head, hollow-eyed. Middling long nose, and that bowed over a little, wide mouth, and a good set of teeth, of remarkable pleasant temper, nothing appeared to ruffle his mind, or make him uneasy & of a pleasant countenance.> 12CC74

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:40:20 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24073
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24073


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Josiah Collins, ca. 1840s: <I never understood that Boone run the gauntlet, neither do I think that he did. Andrew Johnson was the very first person that made his escape. A small man; came in, in June following. Bartlett Searcy, another. Came in the next spring. I was a great deal with these 2 men; hunted with them; and Andrew Johnson told me a great deal about how they treated them; and I never heard any thing of their running the gauntlet. Understood that the English Gentlemen gave Boone some clothes, and that after they had left Detroit, Capt. Blackfish told Boone he thot they would fit him best. Don't know this, however, nor the affair of the horse. I understood in those days, from others, not from himself, that something like Schull's statement was common. Rode -- hung his saddle up on this side of the river, & came along on foot. Mr. Hancock was the companion that escaped after Boone, & brot advice to Boonesborough that the expedition was put off 3 weeks.> 12CC74

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:41:32 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24074
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24074


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Josiah Collins, ca. 1840s: <The people were dirty, lousy, ragged, & 1/2 half starved, when I came there> in March 1778. 12CC74

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:42:48 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24075
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24075


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Long Siege John D. Shane interview with Josiah Collins, ca. 1840s: <Blackfish came to the top of a hill, opposite Boonesborough [Hackberry Ridge], & called to see Boone. Boone, and Wm. Bailey Smith went out. Blackfish said to Boone, "Well, Boone, How d'y." "How d'y Blackfish" "Well Boone, what made you run away from me?" "Why because I wanted to see my wife & children." "Well you needn't have run away if you'd asked me, I'd let you come." "Well Boone, I have come to take your fort. If you will surrender, I will take you all to Chillicothe, and you shall be treated well. If not, I will put all the other prisoners to death, & reserve the young squaws for wives." Boone said he would return to the Fort, & counsel with his warriors. Blackfish came again to see what determination they had come to. Bone told him they had determined to defent the Fort to the last. This same day they sent a negro with a flag, for leave to kill some of his beeves; which was of course granted. He next sent the flag back, with proposals to make a treaty the next day, and said they would go home: which was also agreed to by Boone. The negro returned the 3d time, the same day, with the message that Blackfish and some of the warriors wanted to see Boone's squaws. Boone returned answer that Boones squaws were very much afraid of the indians. (The men at the port holes would call to the negro not to come any nearer, or the would shoot him. Didn't want him to make any discoveries.) The treaty was commenced the next day in a lick, where there was a salt spring & a fresh spring, that came out near together, about 60 yards from the fort. The chiefs of the indians said Boone and his chiefs were to meet there together, all unarmed. The indians came out, 2 to 1. Boone & 8 others with him, & of the chiefs (or indians) 18. AFter they had signed the treaty, Blackfish said it was a custom with the Shawanese when they made a treaty, for two of them to take a white man's hand, to shake hands strong, and to make a strong & a firm peace. This stratagem to captivate the whites had been foreseen by Boone, & according to his directions, as soon as the indians commenced to grapple, & endeavour to secure the white men, a party in the fort poured a full and heavy fire on them in the lump, which drove the indians back to their lines & gave opportunity for the whites to escape into the Fort.>

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:43:50 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24076
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24076


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Long Siege John D. Shane interview with Josiah Collins, ca. 1840s: <London, a negro man belonging to Col. Henderson, who had made a place under the cill, to shoot out, was shot and killed, the indians noticing the firing from that place, shot in and killed him.> 12CC75

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:44:28 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24077
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24077


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Josiah Collins, ca. 1840s: <Fanny Calloway's statement, as made to me, of the capture of the three young ladies. . . . The Indians seeing them, had gathered flowers, such as they thought would please them, & stuck them in the bank near the water to decoy them to land, it did so. They run the canoe to shore, & got out to gather the flowers. The indians closed in upon them & made them prisoners, telling them that if they hallooed, they would tomahawk them instantly.> At the rescue: <The 3 girls were sitting, looking on at the indians spitting up their meat. One in particular, big indian called Big Jimmy was spitting up meat on the side opposite to them. Fanny looked at him to see how he fixed his meat. She saw the blood burst out of his breast before she heard the gun. Other guns were fired & killed another inaidn. There were 18 white men, the girls inmmediately rose up and run to them.> 12CC75

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:45:09 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24078
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24078


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Josiah Collins, ca. 1840s: Andrew Johnson -- Pequolly. <His adopted father came to Ky. to steal horses, and in his father's absence, he & his indian brother had a fight. He proving too strong, put the family all in fear of him. When his father returned the 1st that was told him was that Pequolly had fought his brother. His father gave him a great reprimand for fighting his brother in his absence, & threatened to sell him for his bad behaviour. That night was to be a great war dance, the warriors haveing returned home. His father to punish him, told him to go to bed with the children. He shouldn't go to the dance. Pequolly went to his bed as ordered, but some time after, rose up and went out to the dance. His father asked him what business he had there. He replied he wanted to dance. His father told him to take a dance, go hom, and not to come back. He did so, took his father's gun, tomahawk, knife, powder, and lead, blanket coat, &c. & escaped, rafter the Ohio, & came safe into Harrodsburg. Staid there about 2 weeks, took 4 men with him, went back on an expedition to Chillicothe, and about 10 miles on this side, they heard bells open late in the evening near them. They secreted themselves till some time int he night, caught the indian horses & tied them, then crept up near the indian camp, fired in on them and killed 2. Capt. Blackfish being one of the indian party, cried out huy! huy! Shawanese, we are Shawnees, but as Pequolly's company kept up the fire, Blackfish & his men made their escape, went into Chillicothe, & tells Boone the circumstances, & he suspected it was some other tribe of Indians that had come on them to war, raised what indian men they could & returned back to the camp, found 2 indians dead & the horses gone, returned home and told Boone that he could not tell who had done it.> A few Indians returning from Kentucky saw Pequolly and his men passing south and brought that news to Blackfish. <The returned & tells Boone that P. was a little man, but a great rogue.> 12CC76

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:46:33 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24079
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24079


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane on his own enterprise of interviewing pioneers: <My aim has been to get of them what they themselves know. And they may not know I will ever see another person. Weldom have [I] mentioned[,] named, or alluded (to the knowledge of the persons I was talking with) to what any other person had been telling me.> 12CC78

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:48:00 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24080
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24080


1840-11

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Statement of William Sudduth, 11/1840: <I went as a volunteer. We crossed the river where Maysville now is, and proceeded on to the towns. The night before we reached the towns, one of our men deserted & apprised the indians of our approach. We started about midnight & arrived at the 1st towns; Elliott's town, & Machachack, about 12 O'clock the next day. The indians had not dispersed, & we charged on them without any line of battle being formed, and I think in 20 minutes after we 1st saw the town, no one capt. had 20 of his own men with him. The indians ran in every direction to endeavor to make their escape. We took upwards of 30 prisoners. All but 3 were women & children. And killed a few warriors. We took 3 men. The Shawnee king, an old man by the name of Moluntha, was taken & bro't to where the prisoners were collected, and instantly knocked in the head by Major Hugh McGary. A young warrior was taken & put under guard, & murdered by some of McGary's party the next evening. And a French trader was taken, & brot in after the prisoners were secured.> The ride to at least two other towns and destroy them. <Col. Daniel Boone & Simon Kenton were on this campaign.> 12CC83

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:49:23 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24081
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24081


1840-11

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Statement of William Sudduth, 11/1840: <It is stated in McClung's History of the life of Col. Danl. Boone, that the Col. could neither read nor write. It is not so. Col. Boone acted as a deputy surveyor under Col. Thos. marshall, & returned many surveys, as the records of Fayette County will show. In 1797 I was appointed surveyor of Clarke County. Col. Boone took a deputation under me, & made several surveys. He made out his plats in my office, without any assistance. He wrote what would be called a common farmer's hand.> 12CC96

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:50:27 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24082
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24082


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Josiah Collins, ca. 1840s; came to Boonesborough in 3/1778 while DB in captivity: <It was while Boone was in Ky. 2 years, alone, and had sent back Squire B., his brother, after horses & more ammunition, that his wife got in that way. When he went home in 1771, there was a child in the cradle. When he came, & she met him, she cried for shame I suppose. Daniel wanted to know what she cried for. She pointed to the cradle. He knew it couldnt be his, for he hadn't seen her for 2 years. Oh well! says he, whose is it. Why its brother Squire's. Well, says he, one of the name is all the same; & so hushed her up. Daniel Boone's wife was a Bryant. She was a sister of Mr. Bryant the 1st settler of Bryant's Station. When Mrs. Danl. Boone went in, in 1778, Squire Boone & his family, were here at Boonesborough. She then left him, she said, because she thought the indians would kill him. He would never get back. In that case she wanted to be with her father and family. <When Hays came to Boone for his daughter, B. told him it would not suit, she would [blanked out] him. [?] Hays wavered all apprehensions, and they were married. The thing was realized. Hays came & complained to Boone. B. replied, didn't I tell you she would [blanked out] you. Trot father, trot mother, how could you expect a pacing colt. [Shane comment: When I expressed to Mr. Collins my surprise at Boone's injustice to himself in this remark, he reminded me that B. was raised in the backwoods of Carolina, that those times were very different from these, and that such things then were not what they now would be.] Susan when I saw her at Boonesborough, was a clever, pretty, well behaved woman. These were stories that were in circulation, & not any thing that I saw. [Shane comment: And yet Mr. C. would not deny but he believed them true.] Daniel Boone was a backwoodsman, a hunter, & a warrior; and these were the points in which his Yar [? or Xar? character] shows to advantage. Yet he was a remarkagbly pleasant, good-natured, mannerly man, for his education; as much so as any one I ever saw.> 12CC97

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:52:31 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24083
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24083


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Josiah Collins, ca. 1840s: <Andy Johnson, from Harrodsburg, went there & got some clothes for his sweetheard, a widow & her 2 children. Squire Boone came from Boonesborough, by Harrodsburg, on his way to Louisville, with a lot of cattle he was taking there to market, & stopped in at the widow White's, (Betty White, an irish woman, her husband had been killed by the indians before I came out here.) and engaged in boarding. He then stepped out & went into a dutch widow woman's . . . . The irish widow went into the Dutch widow's house, and there saw her down [several words blanked out]. Squire Boone spring up dashed out oat the back window or door, and went into the fort & staid there all night. The 2 widows quarreled, and Andy's wouldn't have him, because he was little & the big dutch woman said she could whip them both. Andy cried about it. The men of the fort got around, & persuaded her to change again, and they were married: [several words blanked out] When Gov. Roseblock was taken by Clark at Kaskaskias, a young squaw that he had raised was taken with him. This squaw afterwards fell into Squire Boone;s hands, and he went with them (her & 2 negro wenches) round to Natchez, & from there afterwards to Mo., leaving his wife & family in Ky. They afterwards got to him, however, in Mo. Yet this was the man that was in the Va. Legislature. [?]> 12CC99

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:54:08 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24084
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24084


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Josiah Collins, ca. 1840s: <Capt. Will had Wm. Hancock prisoner. Capt. Will asked him what his name was. He said it was William Hancock. Capt. Will said William Hancock too much; Will was enough. His name was Will, my name's Will. Capt. Will had Hancock's gray mare. One day she came up. Hancock went out to look at her. Capt. Will saw it & came out & asked him what he was looking at that mare for. Why, says Hancock, she's mine. You lie, says Capt. Will, she's mine. Why you stole her, says Hancock, from me at Boonesborough. All the men & all the horses, says Capt. Will, at Boonesborough belong to me.> 12CC105

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:55:00 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24085
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24085


1844

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Samuel Treble, ca. 1840s: <Michael Stoner was at Boonesborough at the time of the attack [in 4/1777]. In the morning -- the 1st intimation was in the killing of Skiggs. He had started out to go on a hunt, & was shot Say some 6 or 7 ran out, concluding it was some straggling indian -- Michael Stoner was one of them. He recieved 2 wounds, a flesh wound in the right hip, the ball going in & out about 2 inches apart -- and a wound in the left arm, the ball passing between the bones. Mr. Haye ran to him to help him allong. Stoner called to him for God's sake to let him go, they were too big a mark: one was enough to shoot at. He then scuffled along on his well arm & let into the fort. Monk fired from the gate, when the indians pressed on, and made a hole through them: & that kept them back. Stoner had fainted from loss of blood & exhaustion; and Mima Boon was bathing him. When he had come to himself a little, he asked her what she was doind? She explained to him what had happened, & how that the indians had attacked the fort. "Ry [?] my life," said he, "my gun, my gun": and that day killed several indians while Mima ran bullets for him. Stoner was married to my oldest sister.> 12CC43

File: 12CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/12/2017 10:57:08 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24057
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24057


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Josiah Collins, ca. 1840s: <I went with him [DB] to bury his brother Edward & pursue the indians. Suppose the date [10/6/1780 in the Filson-Boone narrative] is correct. They had taken 4 horses. Each was riding, & each led a horse. The buffaloe were all gone from about where they were living then, & they had taken pack-horses, & gone down to the Upper Blue Licks where there were always buffaloe to kill & get. Arriving at the Lick, Danl. shot a buffaloe, on this side of the river & set Ned to butchering it, while he should go over where he saw there were more, & kill another. . . . Returning to his brother, they put a 1/2 of the buffaloe on each horse, that they were leading, & so came back on the trace 15 miles towards Strodes S[tation]. Here they stopped, unloaded their horses, & let them feed. Ned waited to watch & take care of them, while Danl. thot to find some more buffaloe. They had stopped at a deer Lick [in the bend of the Creek, near to where Flat rock, Bourbon County now is], at which Danl. had thot to find more buffaloe; but finding none there he thot he would take a little round, & leave his brother Ned to take care of the horses & meat. . . . He soon met a young like bear. As soon as he shot, he heard another gun at the Lick where he had left Ned. Immediately the indians behind him shot at him, but missed him. He jumped over the bear into a cane-break, & was followed by the scout of a dog, yelping, till he contrived again to get his gun loaded, & then he turned up with the dog, they raised the yell & stopped. They got the horses & meat & Ned Boone's scalp.> 12CC108-109

File: 12CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/13/2017 11:36:25 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24087
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24087


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Jeptha Kemper, ca. 1840s: On salt: <In those times, salt wa at first measured. In doing this, it was passed through a sieve into the measure; and if any thing caused the floor to far in the least so as to settle it, it was emptied out and sifted again into the measure. It of course now was perfectly dry. But when the rule was adopted that a bushel should way [sic] 50 lbs, the salt was left so wet that it would drip along the road, as it was carried home.> 12CC128

File: 12CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/13/2017 11:37:12 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24088
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24088


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Jacob Stevens, ca. 1840s: He was one of five spies that went ahead of the column to scout the Indian trail to the Licking river. He witnessed the council on the banks of the river. <In the council McGary who was only a private, wanted to know by Godly (as he would say when he was in earnest) what we came here for? They said, to fight the indians. By godly, said he, then why not fight them. "Then let's fight them. They that aint cowards follow me."> Saw George Corn shot right in the mouth, taking out all the upper and lower teeth on the right side; <I saw him spit the ball in his right hand.> <Jim Hays on the other side of me, said he be damned if he didn't shoot one. I told him to take care or he would get it next, and had scarce said it, when he recieved a shot in the collar bone. Both of these [men] fell down, and as soon as they could, crept back, got on horses, and got to Bryant's S[tation] that same day. I had fired 3 times and was just priming for the fourth, when the word was given for to retreat. The indians rode in a body all in front of us, seeming to me 7 or 8 deep and screamed and rushed on. . . . When I turned to get my horse, he was gone. I didn't wait to go to the ford . . . but plunged in higher up, above the ford, where the water came up to my neck. I was determined to save my gun, or I [would] had swum. When I got over, I stopped and drew off my buck-skin breeches; the bullits all the while showering round me, & one passing through about the middle of the britches thigh as I held them in my hands. The buckskins, when wet were so heavy we couldn't run, having them on. I then had on my short-leggings, moccasins, and shirt. On the top of the hill, I fell in with a man who had red leggings on, . . . and we ran on together about a mile from the river, the indians pursuing and firing on us at every hollow, till my companion gave out. I asked him what I should do. He said, make your escape, and stood snapping his gun, which had gotten wet, as well as mine, so that we couldn't get them off, till the indians came up and took it out of his hands. It was supposed he was killed next morning. The indians stood, and signed, and pointed after me, waiving their guns in a circle, as a token that I was given up.> 12CC134-135

File: 12CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/13/2017 11:38:20 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24089
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24089


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Jacob Stevens, ca. 1840s: About a year after the battle, twelve prisoners that had been taken then, and their lives spared, were returned to KY. Among them was Hugh Cunningham: <H.C. and his wife were both right [?] Irish. Hugh had been gone so long, his wife had made another engagement and was just about to be married on the evening succeeding Hugh's arrival: and perhaps to a much younger & likelier man. With feelings of bitter disappointment, therefore, she saluted him, coming in -- "Well Hugh, are you alive yet? Hugh picked [piqued] at thereception, crustily resplied [sic], "Yes you dom [sic] fool! don't you see I am?"> Shane here cites Genesis 45:26 -- "And Jacob's heart fainted, for he believed them not." 12CC136

File: 12CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/13/2017 11:39:32 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24090
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24090


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Jacob Stevens, ca. 1840s: Knew Hugh McGary well, for his second wife was Caty Yocum, sister of Steven's wife. McGary was first married to widow Ray, and was step-father to her boys. In the spring of 1779 William Ray was killed by Indians while fixing a sugar camp; they cut his body in pieces and stuck them on the bushes. As a result, McGary's wife took sick and never recovered. Soon thereafter, Harrodsburg was attacked. <McGary killed an indian that he found had his step-son's shirt on, and cut him up and fed him to the dogs.> [Shane comment: It was the terrible thing the Indians had done to his step-son <what made him so fierce against the indians.>] 12CC136

File: 12CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/13/2017 11:40:36 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24091
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24091


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with John Hanks, ca. 1840s: <In May 1786 we came to Ky. Col. Boon had a little store at Limestone then. We went out a hunting, and Boon lent me his rifle, in place of my taking my own, saying, as I carried it on my shoulder, if I saw any Buffaloe, it would twist round towards them. In 1789 he had a little store at the mouth of the Kenhawa.> 12CC140

File: 12CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/13/2017 11:42:28 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24092
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24092


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with John Hanks, ca. 1840s: Blue Jacket Hanks, with several other men, pursuing Indians who had stolen horses near Stroud's Station. They came upon a rear party, cornered one man, Blue Jacket. <I was just about to shoot him, when Hood . . . knowkced my gun up, saying, you will kill some of our men: and Blue Jacket ran right into my arms, having 1st thrown away his weapons. Our James Baize, who had formerly been a prisoner among the indians, came up and hit him with the britch of his gun over the eye, so that it raised a great lump as big as your fist. The knocked 6 rings out of his ear, which I picked up and kept. Blue Jacket begged, said he didn't want to kill any body, he only wanted to steal a horse. . . . Instead of killing him there, after eating our mess, he was set on a horse, and piloted us to Maysville that night. If we gave him any thing at the mess, he would always take it and say Col. Boone had given him such meat or tobacco. Boon's son and he had gone out over the Ohio from Limestone often the summer before, to hunt deer. I staid in another house that night, but went out in the night, and Frank Jones of the Cross plains, who was half drunk, had Blue Jacket on his knee[s]. [?] Next 2d or 3d night we stopped at Scouce's Station up on Hinkston. That night we were all drinking. Stephen Biles was placed sentry. A log chain had been put up on Blue Jacket, but Biles, who too had been drinking, got to nodding, and Blue Jacket discovering it, slipped the log chain, and made his escape.> 12CC141

File: 12CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/13/2017 11:43:23 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24093
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24093


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Marcus Richardson, ca. 1840s: With several other men came down the Ohio in ca. 1793, stopped at Limestone. <Squire [Jacob] Boone, brother [cousin] of Col. D.B. had a 2 story log-house at Limestone then, & we went up to his house, to see if we could get lodging. When we got there, it was a little in the night, and Boon was in bed. We knocked at the door, & a negro woman came. We asked for her master, & she showed us up stairs to his room. We told him we wanted lodging; didn't expect to get a bed to sleep in, were prepared to lodge on the floor, and asked privilege. This he granted, but we were to sweep it up in the morning. Some of the company impertinately enquired if it was clean then. At this he bid us be gone, for rascals & rogues, that we shouldn't sleep there: & we had to hunt lodgings afresh, which with much difficulty, after dividing into 2 companys both parties got. I only saw Boon next morning; didn't speak to him.> 12CC155

File: 12CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/13/2017 11:44:11 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24094
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24094


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with David Thompson, ca. 1840s: <When my father landed at Limestone, May 1, 1787, Danl. Boone had then a fort & warehouse there. He never owned the land at Athens, Boon's Station. He thot he did, but it belonged to one Gordon, of Spottsvylavnia Co. Va. Old Robt. Frank, married [Gordon's] sister, and got the land, & settled there. From Limestone, Boone moved up to the mouth of the Kanhawa; & from there came on to the Brushy fork of Hinkston, in Bourbon Co., and from there went to Mo.> 12CC199

File: 12CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/13/2017 11:45:00 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24095
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24095


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with David Thompson, ca. 1840s: Says this told him by DB himself: The rescuers look down on the Indian camp: DB <could see Blackfish's son, between the girls on a log. The fire of his gun killed Blackfish's son, and was the signal for the others, who rushed on, while the girls rushed towards them, and so escaped tho' not without being pursued by the indians.> 12CC200

File: 12CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/13/2017 11:46:03 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24096
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24096


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with David Thompson, ca. 1840s: <Boone just loaned my father britching, without ever having seen him before. He was a very hospitable man, but careless [in business].> 12CC201

File: 12CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/13/2017 11:47:22 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24097
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24097


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Richard French, ca. 1840s: He son of James and Keziah Callaway French, his mother the sister of Flanders Callaway. She told him that the "big girls" (Betsey, Francis, and Mima) would not let the "little girls" come along on the river trip. Keziah <well remembered that she at the time was one of the little girls, and cried to go along.> She also told him that when Samuel Henderson returned from hunting and found his fiance had been taken, he cried. 12CC204

File: 12CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/13/2017 11:48:40 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24098
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24098


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Richard French, ca. 1840s: Recounting the stories told by his mother Keziah Callaway French. <When the siege at Boonesborough was over, the cattle could scarcely low, so nigh famished for want of water.> <Mrs. French always said if it hadn't been for Col. Callaway, the fort would have been surrendered. Boone was willing & wished to surrender. Mrs. French never could bear an indian's presence. Her father was killed, & her brother (Jack), 2 sisters [cousins?], and a cousin (Jones Hoy) were taken by them.> <Mrs. French said Pompey would ride up to the fort, and hollow over "Capt. Boone, Capt. Blackfish wants to see you." Said Boone would rise up, and go out freely to, and among, the Indians. Did so repeatedly. All the women were gathered into a house that was in the centre of the fort. The cattle that were in the fort, & whenever there was a firing, would run round; and the women & children in the house would be put in the utmost confusion.> 12CC205

File: 12CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/13/2017 11:49:48 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24099
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24099


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Thomas Jones, ca. 1840s: Pursuing Indians who stole horses near Strode's Station in 1788; come upon several, capture one, Blue Jacket. <As soon as taken, he pointed towards Maysville, and called Boone! Boone! We got all our horses, and some strays they had picked up, making about 15. We then made Blue-Jacket our pilot, with strict injuctions to take us direct, and proceeded that night to Maysville, where we put him under charge of Daniel Boone, who lived there for several years, for the night; we being weary, and needing rest. Blue-Jacket got away from us before we got home. He had been put in a new cabin, and it was thought was quite secure. But a knife happening to be sticking in the logs near him, he worked around till he got it, and cut the rope with which he was bound, & cleared out just about day. A young man who afterwards came away, was at the [Shawnee] towns at the time Blue Jacket arrived, and said he came naked and greatly torn & bruised by the bushes. He had lost his leggings & match-coat, passing through the bushes. The leggings were found by some who pursued after him. Blue Jacked called the young men together & told them never to go there any more to steal horses, for they would be sure to catch them.> 12CC233

File: 12CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/13/2017 11:52:30 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24100
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24100


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Daniel Deron, ca. 1840s: <Boone had a cabin built out of an old boat.> 12CC243

File: 12CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/13/2017 11:53:48 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24101
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24101


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Samuel Potts Pointer, ca. 1840s: Was in Limestone in the early '90s, by which time DB was already in Kanahwa. <Thos. Boon lived just above the [Limestone] Creek, a few hundred yards, in a red house. The place became a landing.> <Jacob Boon lived in Limestone, right at the corner; right next [to] the mouth of the Creek. He had a warehouse, into which he used to load and unload boats out of the Creek. The house was frame. The bank of the river broke, & the house fell in. I was there when the bank had broken away more than 1/2 way. The lost the lst row of houses there at M[aysville]. They had just left room for a wagon to pass between them & the river, but the bank was falling in continually.> 12CC249

File: 12CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/13/2017 11:54:45 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24102
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24102


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Samuel Potts Pointer, ca. 1840s: In the late '90s met Jonathan Bryan who told him that he and Boone were going to move to the mouth of Little Sandy, and in a year or two remove to Missouri. 12CC249


File: 12CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/13/2017 11:56:07 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24103
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24103


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Josiah Collins, ca. 1840s: Old Chillicothe and Pickaway destroyed in 7/1780: Chillicothe by the Indians themselves when they saw Clark coming; they retreated to Pickaway, which the Americans attacked, defeating the Shawanee and destroying the town. <The indians didn't build [Old] Chillicothe then any more: but went some distance from there and built a new town, on the west or south west side of the Big Miami, which they called Chillicothe. The Pickaway family united with them, & never built their own town any mpore. These Shawnees whose town was burnt in 1780, Old Chillicothe, had come from the Chillicothe of Scioto. When they had built a town (that which was burnt) they called it Chillicothe too. The Shawnees, whenever they removed & built a town, they called it Chillicothe.> Peace made in 7/1783: <[Maj.] Wales [Walls?] proposed that they should give up all the prisoners on both sides. The indians were willing to exchange, but not to give up more. They said that the whites wouldn't take prisoners, they always killed them. Wales said that they knew that, that they skulked about so, they couldn't take them, they were obliged to kill them. The indians replied they knew that, but that Wales hadn't an equal number of prisoners to exchange, & they wouldn't exchange with them for no more than Wales had of their men. Cajah Calloway, Nathaniel Bullock, & Hoy's son & it may be Jimmy Calloway and another young man & others were gotten at this treaty. They brought in 8 of theirs -- for these 8 squaws we had taken.> 12CC106-107

File: 12CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/13/2017 11:56:54 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24086
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24086


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with D. C. Humphreys, Woodford KY, n.d.: <Daniel Boon greatly over-rated as a pioneer.> Many others came out before him. 16CC292

File: 16CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/14/2017 12:43:04 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24128
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24128


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with John Steele, Bourbon county KY, n.d.: <I was out on the Missouri river in 1810, at the mouth of Shuratangh [?] Creek, about 50 miles above the Mississippi river, trading. Met Boone. His friends didn't wish him to hunt, and had refused to accompany him any more. He went out hunting, and some persons told him of a party of indians, encamped not far off, who intended to kill him. He got on his horse, and went with his negro man, till he came to the neighborhood of the encampment, and then left him [the negro man] behind, and came close enough to spy the indians. He concluded that it was true, what had been told him, and returned home. He never went out any more. I bought of him the last beaver he ever caught: a very fine one.> 16CC297

File: 16CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/14/2017 12:45:27 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24129
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24129


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Col. Francis Flournoy Jackson, ca. 1858-59: In 1801 he went <out to look at the country in Mo., with the view of removing there. Was at Danl Boone's house out in Mo. and staid with him all night during this trip. I recollect to see him strip off and go to bed. He had a fair skin, a Roman nose, rather high cheek bones, rather reddish tinge. The fairest skin, for his amount of exposure, of any man you ever saw. [Shane comment: I showed Col. Jackson my portrait of Boone {which would this be?}. He thought it good, except that Boo's gun was too long, and his legs. Made him look too tall?] Boone was not far from that neighbourhood on the Mo. in which I was expecting to be, he & the Calloways.> <Boone lived at "Boone's Bottom" on the Mo. He had a son, Nathan, as good a woo15dsman as D.B. Could travel as well in a cloudy day, as a clear day. Government gave them land there.> Was able to call on Boone hospitality because his wife was a granddaughter of James Bryan. 15CC7-8

File: 15CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/14/2017 4:22:57 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24198
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24198


1859

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Rober Wickliffe Sr., 4/1859: <Daniel Boone was opposed to the war, had no home, didn't live happily with his family at home, didn't like to work, and was not a very good hunter. These were the only merits D. B. had. [!] Col. Irvine related to Mr. Wickliffe the ancedote about the infidelity of Boone's wife, Sally [sic] Boone. How he returned after a protracted absence, and the statement she made to him. Boone was a good natured man. Did not live at home.> 15CC84

File: 15CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/14/2017 4:24:17 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24199
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24199


1859

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with Rober Wickliffe Sr., 4/1859: William Bailey Smith told him that <Calloway was distressed lest the indians should violate his daughters -- a thing the indians never spoke of. They never did so, with their female prisoners.> 15CC84

File: 15CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/14/2017 4:26:01 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24200
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24200


1833-10-16

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Nathaniel Hart [Jr.] to Mann Butler, Spring Hill KY, 10/16/1833: On his return from KENTUCKEXPLORE2 <The information of Boone so delighted the "Genlt." of N.Carolina, that several of them associated themselves together under the name of Richard Henderson, & Co.> 15CC115

File: 15CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/14/2017 4:27:13 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24201
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24201


1834

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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David Todd to Mann Butler, Columbia MO, 3/17/1834: The son of Levi Todd. Daniel Boone <was a plain, gentlemanly man, good memory, mild, and equable. No ruffian, nor did he partake near as far as I have seen of the slovenly backwoods character. His friendship for the gun, & trap, & scouring the woods for discovery, continued till the last; and his friends, by stratagem, had to prevent his indulgence, when too debilitated to encounter them. He was indifferent in the affairs of the world, and told me that he intrusted to Col. Floyd all his lands, contracts, and rights, to perfect; that the Col's death caused the loss of papers, and that he never looked after them, that what lands he had secured, had proved an injury rather than a benefit, for the uncertainty of location had proved losses to him in sales, that he abandoned Kentucky in despair of ever enjoying any land there; and declared on this side of the Mississippi, he would never recross it. I adverted once to him to the fact that congress had granted him a 1000 acres of land in this country, he said yes, it had done him no good, that he delivered his claim to a Kentuckina, who pursued him on a loss of land in Ky, which he had warranted. He lived and died with a favorite child, and passed his time among them all, who resided near each other.> 15CC126

File: 15CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/14/2017 4:28:40 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24202
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24202


1779-04-15

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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4/15/1779 Association of the settlers for making a crop of corn: <Whereas, we the subscribers being willing and desirious of making a crop of corn at the station of Boonsborough, on the Kentucky, do think it essentially necessary for our own safety and the public good, to enter into rules that may be obligatory on each subscriber, and are as follows: <1st. That three men (to wit) Nathaniel Hart, George Madden, and Robert Cartwright, be and are hereby appointed as overseers or directors to said company. <2d. That every subscriber shall immediately enrole [sic] his name on a list prepared for that purpose, and shall every morning appear at the beat of the drum or some other notice given, and receive such orders as the overseers or directors shall think convenient to give. <3d. That if any man refuse or neglect to perform such tours of duty as shall be assigned him by the overseers or directors he shall be erased out of the list, and shall forfeit all pretensions to any claim in such crop. <4th. That every morning two or more men be sent out as spies, to range round the grounds and fields to be cultivated by us, and that such number as shall be thought necessary be stationed as a guard, the whole day, or to be relieved by others as occasion requires. <5th. That no man be allowed to absent himself from the company on any pretence whatsoever, either hunting horses or provisions, or any other occasion, without leave of the overseers first had. <6th. That the managers or overseers shall have full power and authority to determine all unforseen disputes whatsoever, and that the subscribers shall be obliged to abide thereby. In testimony whereof, we have hereunto set out hands this 15th of April, 1779.> Signed by: Nathaniel Hart, George Madden, Robert Cartwright, Nicholas Anderson, Edward Williams, Jesse Peake, William Hall, Edward Hall, Thomas Hall, William Johnson, John Harper, John Kelley, Beal Kelley, Benjamin White, Peter Harper, Whitson George, Jesse Oldham, John Cartwright, James Anthony. Printed in LOUISVILLE NEWS-LETTER, 7/18/1840 1CC206-207

File: 1CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/14/2017 7:16:13 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24242
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24242


1845

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<DANIEL BOONE -- The people of Kentucky will be gratified to learn, says the Franfort YEOMAN of Thursday, that the remains of Daniel Boone and wife were brought here on the 23d ultimo, for interment in the new Cemetery. We understand the ceremony of burial will take place early in September, under as imposing auspices as the occasion should demand, at which time we will make such remarks as are naturally suggested in recurring to the early history of the pioneers of Kentucky, and to the patriotism which prompted the removal of the remains to this, their appropriate final resting place.> THE MAYSVILLE EAGLE, 8/6/1845 in 28CC72

File: 28CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/15/2017 11:09:16 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24248
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24248


1844

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Unidentified newsclipping, ca. 1844: <THE GRAVE OF DANIEL BOONE -- The St. Louis NEW ERA, in the course of a sensible article, suggesting to the people of Kentucky and Missouri the propriety of erecting a monument over the remains of Daniel Boone, says: "The celebrated pioneer, after a life of incredible hardships, and innumerable perilous adventures, died in the year 1824 [sic], near the old Charette village, in what is now Warren county, and was buried about a mile from the town of Marthasville. His wife, the first white woman who entered Kentucky, is buried by his side. Several of the old settlers of Missouri are buried at the same spot, and the grave yard has grown over with a thicket of briars several feet high and almost inpenetrable. The traveller passes by the spot, and never knows that THERE lies buried one of the most wonderful men that has existed in our country. For many years there was not even a tomb-stone to mark the grave; but a few years ago a very aged settler of St. Charles county, named Jonathan Bryan, with his own hands cut out a rough tomb-stone, about two feet high, and placed it at the head of the grave of Daniel Boone, and that is the only monument that has ever been erected to his memory.> 28CC57

File: 28CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/15/2017 11:10:31 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24247
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24247


1848

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<BOONE MONUMENT -- In May and June last, the committee to solicit funds for the erection of a monument to the memory of the Kentucky Pioneer, Daniel Boone, and wife, over their graves in the Frankfort Cemetery, addressed circular letters to every justice of the peace, and county court clerk in the State, and to a number of private individuals, respectfully asking them to solicit, or appoint agents in their respective counties to solicit contributions in small sums to effect that patriotic object. As yet there has not been a single response, and we are requested by the committee, to call the attention of those addressed to the subject, and to solicit an early reply. It can hardly be believed that nothing has been done.> Copied from the Franfort KENTUCKY YEOMAN in the WEEKLY JOURNAL, 9/8/1848 clipping in 29CC125

File: 29CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/15/2017 11:14:05 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24250
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24250


1845

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<This imposing ceremony took place in the presence of a concourse of people whose numbers have been variously estimated at from fifteen to twenty thousand. . . . It seemed as if the valley of Frankfort could scarcely afford space to form them into line, and indeed this was only effected by commencing at the extreme verge of the city, throwing and doubling the files into close order and taking the advantage of occupying several streets in the march. To the beholder this vast mass of men, women, and children, moving in solemn procession to the sound of the dead march was imposing indeed, but it faded almost into nothing when the head of the columns came in view of the Cemetery Hill. All at once it seemed as if by the wand of a magician the very stones of the craggy precipices had been turned into human beings. There they stood, the young and the old, the beautiful female, the smiling infant, every age, sex, and condition, rising rank upon rank on that towering amphitheatre. . . . After the ceremonies were over, the coffins were lowered into the graves, and the pall-bearers threw some earth over the remains. It was then that the multitude pressed forward to take part in this office, and hundreds and hundreds assisted in filling up the graves.> Frankfort COMMONWEALTH copied in WEEKLY JOURNAL 9/17/1845, clipping in 30CC4-5

File: 30CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/15/2017 11:56:06 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24265
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24265


1845

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<The remains of Daniel Boone and wife were brought to Frankfort, on the 23d inst., under the care of Col. William Boone, of Shelby county, the oldest surviving nephew of the deceased and Messr. Thos. L. Crittenden and Philip Swigert, of this place. These gentlemen visited Missouri as a committee for that purpose, being charged, by the Frankfort Cemetery company, with the patriotic duty of removing to the land of their early vicisitudes and trials, the remains of these noble and fearless pioneers. . . . The consent to their removal was first obtained from Captain Nathan Boone, of the U.S. Rangers, their only surviving son, and from their numerous descendants now resident in Missouri, in pursuance of the request of the Company, and in which request many of the distinguished citizens of our State united. They were disintered from the spot, where they had been buried, near Marthasville, Missouri, and a large number of their connections and descendants were present at the ceremony. The committee speak in terms of high gratification at the kind and hospitable manner in which they were received and entertained by the relatives during their visit.> Frankfort COMMONWEALTH, 7/29/1845 in 3OCC30

File: 30CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/15/2017 11:57:25 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24266
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24266


1845

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<On Saturday, the 13th day of September, their mortal remains will be finally committed to the soil of Kentucky. They will be interred in Boone's Grove, in the grounds of the new Cemetery immediately above the capitol. A beautiful spot is selected on the high cliff of the Kentucky, where they will forever rest -- guarded -- respected -- protected -- by the descendants of those who shared their early perils and stirring adventures. This was their favorite stream; and we most cordially invite all those who honor and revere the memory of our early adventurers, to join us in the piour duty of interring on its banks their honored remains.> Frankfort KENTUCKY YEOMAN 8/28/1845 clipping in 30CC95

File: 30CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/15/2017 11:58:13 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24267
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24267


1805

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Unidentified newspaper clipping: <In June of 1805 I crossed the Mississippi river, and directed my course to St. Charles, on the Missouri; from thence to the Femizash [Femme Osage] river, and explored the country to the extremity of the settlement, in order to obtain a correct knowledge of its situation, that I might correctly report it to the ensuing conference. In my route I preached at a number of places, and to very attentive hearers, thoush perhaps their attention was owing entirely to curiosity, as I was the first Methodist preacher that had then visited that country, and perhaps the first some of them ever heard. I had especially a fine congregation at Mr. Callinay's [Flanders Callaway's], on the Femizash [Femme Osage] river, who was a son-in-law to Daniel Boon, the famous pioneer, whom I had the pleasure of seeing. Mr Callinay [Callaway] was a member of the Baptist church, and I believe a worthy man.> 26CC39

File: 26CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/15/2017 1:59:05 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24288
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24288


1845

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<As we predicted last week, thousands attended the funeral ceremonies upon the occasion of the burial of Daniel Boone and Wife, on Saturday last. Never have we seen such a concourse of people in Frankfort, and rarely have we seen so many congregated together at any place. The town had been more that usually full all the week, but on Friday strangers began to arrive who come to attend the funeral only. They continued coming in nearly all night, and in the morning of Saturday by early dawn the roads were full of people. By 10 o'clock every street in town seemed more or less alive with the passers to and fro, and Main street was so densely filled that a vehicle of any kind could hardly pass along. At that hour a signal gun for the procession to form was fired and each section . . . repaired to its respective position, and was formed in the order here laid down.> Pall bearers: Col. Richard M. Johnson, Gen. James Taylor, Gen. James Ward, Gen. Robert B. McAfee, Gen. Peter Jordan, Waller Bullock, Capt. Thomas Joyse, Mr. Landon Sneed, Col. John Johnson, Maj. Z. Williams, Col. William L. Boone. <When part of [the procession] was at the grave almost a mile from town by the meanderings of the road, a part was still in town, while thousands found their way to the Cemetery grounds by various routes. Arrived at the grave, the company was brought together in a beautiful hollow near the grave, ascending from the centre on every side and enabling all present to see each other as if in a vast amphitheatre. Here the funeral services took place. . . . The coffins were then lowered into the graves and covered over, from whence they will never be removed.> Frankfort KENTUCKY YEOMAN, 9/18/1845. 26CC54

File: 26CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/15/2017 2:00:57 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24289
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24289


1838-11-09

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Deposition of Benjamin A. Cooper, 11/9/1838: <I was Lieutenant in Capt. Scott's company in Kentucky, and was in the battle of the Blue Licks, and was of Col. Trigg's regiment. I was married to a relation of Col. Daniel Boone, and was intimate with him. I knew Levi Todd, a Major in command that day, having been in several battles with him. I knew Col. John Todd, who commanded in chief, and knew generally all the officers in the engagement. I jointed the Fayette troops at Bryant's Station the day the Indians left there, and the troops then collected, and marched in pursuit of the Indians towards the Blue Licks. I was with Col. Boone when he, by counting the Indian fires, concluded there were at least 500 Indians. When the troops came near the Indians, at the Blue Licks, there was a general council of officers held, at which I was present, and I knew the officers were of opinion and had decided not to fight the battle -- that they were too weak and the enemy too strong. I knew the opinion of Col. Joh Todd and Major Levi Todd, to have concurred in that opinion, for I conversed with Levi Todd in the council, and had just before requested him to speak to his brother, Col. John Todd, and inform him, as he commanded, of the desperate state of our troops contending against so much odds, and I heard distinctly Col. John Todd's opinion. Levi Todd's and Daniel Boone's to the same effect. The action was forced upon us by the act of Major Hugh Magurey [McGary], who broke from the council, and called upon the troops who were not cowards to follow him, and thus collecting a band, went without order, and against orders, into the action, and in consequence of this act a general pursuit of officers and men took place, more to save the desperate men that followed Magary [McGary] than from a hope of a successful fight with the Indians.> Unidentified news clipping, copied from the St. Louis NEW ERA, 11/6/1845 in 26CC55

File: 26CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/15/2017 2:04:03 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24290
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24290


1799

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Deposition of William Cocke, ca. 1799, 1: <In the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy five the said Richard Henderson and Company purchased a Large tract of Country of the Cherokee Indians on the waters of Kentucky, Cumberland and Tennessee and imployed your orator to inlist or hire men to assist in Clearing a road and finding provisions for the said workmen while they were imployed in Cutting a road from a place called the Block house to Martain's Station in Powels Valley and your orator doth expressely charge that he imployed a number of men to assist in Cutting the said road and worked himself and found two negro fellows who worked on said road untill Richard Henderson one of the Company and chief director of the Companies concerns over took your orator & Samuel Henderson who had been imployed as aforesaid together with a number of men in the said Hendersons imploy and to whom your orator had furnished provisions for at the special instance & request of the said Richard Henderson who being in [torn] that the way to Kentucky [torn] intolerable that it would be with great difficulty that waggons could be taken to Kentuck who then directed the waggons to be unloaded and the Horses pact & the said Richard Henderson, Nathaniel Hart, John Luttrell & your orator and a number of men as well as your orator recollects to the number of about forty or fifty then set out for the purpose of setteling the Kentucky Country and was met near Cumberland Gap by a Number of wounded men among which was two of the name of Imman the said Henderson Seemed much dispirited and Seeing that all the men who had gone on before them as your Orator believes being about three hundred had fled except Daniel Boon and a party of about fifteen who Stayed to take care of the wounded and on being informed that William Twitty & a number of others was killed & fear full lest Boon & the men with him should abandon the Country made your orator an offer of twenty [sic] thousand acres of Land to be taken by your orator in any part of the said Companies purchase that he might Choose provided that your orator would go forward from Cumberland River to Kentucky River and prevail on Boon & the men that was with him to make a stand untill the said Richard and the men that was with him Could Join the men that was with the wounded on Kentuck River> continued

File: 2CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/21/2017 3:41:38 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24297
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24297


1799

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Deposition of William Cocke, ca. 1799, 2: <your orator consented to go for ten Thousand acres of Choice Land provided he the said Henderson Could get any person to go in C[ompany] with your Orator & the said [Henderson] made offers through out his camp Then being at Cumberland River of ten thousand acres of Land to any person who would go with your orator to Boons Camp on Kentuck river since called Boons Borough about a hundred miles distance where the wounded men lay but no person would consent to go except your orator who was partly induced as well by the tears of said Henderson as the reward which he offered of ten thousand acres of Land which he promised to give unto your orator the said Henderson then sheding tears in presence of your orator and saying that himself and company wa ruined if they did not succeed in making a settlement in the Kentuck Country and your orator doth expressly charge that he set out from Cumberland River by himself and performed the service which he had undertaken for the said Company and that the said Henderson when he joined Boons Company expressed himself to be much obliged to your orator for the service he had rendered to himself and Company and said your orator should have the Land he had promised him and the said Henderson for himself and Company promised to your orator that he should also have five thousand acre of Land for the service he had rendered the work which himself and hands had done in Clearing the road at twenty shillings sterling money or the Value thereof for each Hundred acres to be paid for in the provisions which your orator furnished the said Company and the labour of his negroes and the sald of a servant man Named Joseph Leach which your orator purchased of Andrew Green and let the said [John Lu]tterell have.> The nature of this complaint, of course, is that he never received a single acre of either of these promised grants. Mss copy, 2CC1

File: 2CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/21/2017 3:42:35 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24298
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24298


1833-10-10

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Nathaniel Hart [Jr.] to Mann Butler, Springhill [NC], 10/10/1833. DB returned from KY in the spring of '71 <and gave a description of the Country to many Gentlemen in North Carolina, my Father Capt. Nath. Hart amongst the rest. My father and several others, who had been raised in Hanover County Virginia had imigrated to N. Carolina as early as the year 1756. The information of Boone so delighted the Gentl. of N. Carolina that several of them associated themselves together under the name of Richard Henderson & Co. . . . for the purpose of purchasing a portion of the Country from the Cherokee Indians. . . .> 2CC25

File: 2CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/21/2017 3:44:24 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24299
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24299


1777

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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4/30/1777: <Butler (Kentucky) arrived from Boonesborough, & informed us that on Thursday last (24th April) a body of Indians, in number 40 or 50, attacked that place, killed & scalped Daniel Goodman, wounded D. Boon, I. Hite, Jno. Todd, & Michael Stoner.> 5/27/1777: <Alarms this morning. Express arrived from Logan's and informed us that Boon's Fort was attacked on Friday morning last (23d. May) & a brisk firing kept up until Sunday monring when they left the place.> 6/4/1777: <during the heavy firing on Boonsborough 23d and 24th May, there were but three men wounded; this hoped not mortally; . . . the Indians tried to burn the fort, but were prevented by considerable loss.> 6/5/1777: <Express returned from Boonesborough & says that Tuesday last they went within 1 1/2 miles of the Fort, and found a large part of Indians there, and thought not fit to attempt going in.> 6/25/1777: <Express arrived from Logan's & Boonesborough & say that the Indians fired at Boon's without any damage except killing cattle.> John Cowan, Journal kept at Harrodsburg. 4CC30

File: 4CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/21/2017 4:11:38 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24308
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24308


1788

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<The subscribers being proprietors of a tract of land iopposite the mouth of Licking river on the NW side of the Oho, have determined to lay off a town upon that excellent situation the local and natural advantages speaks its future prosperity being equal if not superior to any ont eh nagk of Ohio between the Miamies. The inlots to be each half an acre, the out lots four acres, thirty of each to be given to settlers upon pay one dollar and a half for the survey and deed of each lot. The fifteenth day of September is appointed for a large company to meet in Lexington and make a road from thence to the mouth of Licking provided Judge Symmes arrives, being daily expected. When the Town is laid off lots will be given to such as may become residents before the first of April next. Matthias Denman, Robert Patterson, John Filson> KENTUCKY GAZETTE 8/20/1788 8CC6

File: 8CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/21/2017 4:28:21 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24314
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24314


1788

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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An unsigned mss on Matthias Denman says that MD was from New Jersey, knew Symmes, and had made an agreement with him to purchase some of his grant in southern Ohio; traveled there, picked his lands, then went to Lexington, where he met Robert Patterson and John Filson, convincing them to participate with him. At that point, the advertisement was inserted in the KENTUCKY GAZETTE. On 9/10/1788 they met at the site of Cincinnati <to survey and plat a town thereon, which was done and it received the rather quaint & pedantic name (given to it by Filson) of Losantiville.> <The Party then felled a large yellow poplar at [the] mouth of mill creek and made a handsome "perogue" or large canoe, in which they ascended the big miami as far as the plumb orchard now Hamilton. While feasting on the wild plumbs, Filson strayed away from the rest and is supposed to have been killed by the Indians as he was never afterwards heard of, though tradition speaks of the skeleton of a white man having been found on the supposed place of his murder long afterwards. His proprietary right in Losantiville reverted to Denman and Patterson who sold it to Israel Ludlow.> 8CC9

File: 8CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/21/2017 4:30:15 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24315
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24315


1810

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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William Whitley, Narrative of a Kentucky pioneer, written ca. 1810: Indians stole the settlers horses. <From the time of my horses being taken I had to carry all my meat upon my back from the woods to the station. In the spring 1778 a certain And. Johnson that was taken by Shawnees with Boone & had ran off from them & came in the first man that gave us Information of the distance of their Towns. As I was tired of the calling, to wit, packing & the Saw [?] of retalliation [sic] was sweet And agreeable took it in Mind to go to there towns for horses (I think about may or June 1778). I started in Company with Nehemiah Pore we went on to Harodsburg & was joined by Jno Hoggin, Jno Sovens [?], Saml. Pickings, & And. Johnson. . . . We then crosssed the Ohio upon Rafts, about 14 Miles from the Ohio we fell upon the sign of some Indians, about 3 oclock PM we came to their camp they had just left; we dogg'd them on about one hour by sun we came in hearing of them we went down that night & view there camps & found their number too great to attack them upon Equal Footing. I concluded to lay by untill Just before day and take them by surprise but in the course of the night we were challenged by their Dogs. An old fellow calld the long King got up & set them on Which forcd us to fire We killed two & wounded two & killd a dog there was 25 Indians we got Seven Horses & them of a good Quallity [sic] Then we Returned hom after a Journey of 14 days The name of the Long King & the number of Indians we got from Boon who was then a prisoner with them.> Later discussing another similar raid he says, <We were all painted like & drest like Indians.> 9CC26-

File: 9CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/21/2017 4:35:03 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24316
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24316


1810

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Bowman campaign, 1779 William Whitley, Narrative of a Kentucky pioneer, written ca. 1810: He raised a company, met Bowman at the mouth of Licking. Had, altogether, about 300 men. He was appointed a "pilot." <We went on to the Towns Without ever being Discovered We surounded the Town & In going a round there was an Indian was in the fields I suppose to keep out the stock and discovered us as he made to the Towns he was shot by Hugh Ross & Killd he gave several screams with which the Warriers came out & the whites Fired on them which commencd the action on both sides We fired on both sides all night by Intervals Untill day light Then the firing becam General from all Quartes. We soon got possession of one half of the Towns an Old negro woman came out and informd Col. Bowman that Simon Girty was within a few Miles with 500 Warriers. Upon this Information Bowman Ordered a retreat. We lost 9 men & 2 wounded. Those killd was Elish Bilty [?] & John Moore & seven others. George Clark my bro in law John [Samuel?] Porter wounded we Burnt half the Town Took a great Quantity of plunder & about 300 horses There was nine Indians killd amonst whom was the Commander the Blackfish. That same day we were attacked by the Savages again, & we killd one within about 7 or Eight miles of the Towns Nothing more particular we marched 2 days & nights without sleep & part of the 3d night. We returned home -- a short Expedition.> 9CC33

File: 9CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/21/2017 4:37:03 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24317
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24317


1810

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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William Whitley, Narrative of a Kentucky pioneer, written ca. 1810: <In the year 1780 July 9th General George R. Clark raisd a Company of about 1000 or 1100 Men. Col. Beng Logan next in Command. We met at the Mouth of Lickin. About the time we left Bryants Station a man by name [blank] Ran off a[nd] gave the Indians information we marched Very hard after finding he was gone until we got to the Towns They had vacated Old Chilicotha Town. We Burnt the Town & cut down there corn. We then went on to Pickaway Town where the indians had embodyed [?] & gave Battle We had 15 or 16 Killd & Several wounded There was about 16 or 17 Sculps got (I was here appointed pilot in the Expedition) Amongst the rest we Killd an Owqen Coger [? cousin] of General Clark's He stated he was coming to us when he got shot he had been a prisoner with the Indians & livd several Hours after being shot. Here we Distroyed about 500 Acres of corn. The Indians had a Very strong [mss torn, word unclear] fort but they did not go in it in time of the action In time of the action they some Way caught Capt Hickman (If I mistake not his name) prisoner & then Burnt him As we were informed by the American Prisnors [sic] We Defeated the Indians & drove them from the Towns.> 9CC33-35

File: 9CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/21/2017 4:38:38 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24318
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24318


1782

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John Floyd to William Preston, 8/12/1782: <You will see by the inclosed letter that we have a few more of the yellow militia to deal with, and that of our nearest neighbours too.> 17CC142

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:07:34 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24497
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24497


1782-10-19

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John Floyd to William Preston, Beargrass KY, 10/19/1782: The late attacks have <roused the Kentuckians also to make another effort to reduce the Shawanese. I shall march from here on this Tour the day after tomorrow; We Rendezvous at the mouth of Licking the first of Novr. We shall be able to bring about one thousand men to action, besides leaving a guard on the Ohio. . . . Our little country has received a prodigious shock from the savages since my last to you: Col. Trigg with 11 officers & 50 men from Lincoln, Col. John Todd & 13 privates from Fayette, fell the 19th of August at the lower lick on Licking in a very unequal conflict with the Enemy.> <Without . . . uncommon exertions amongst ourselves the Country must fall a sacrifice to the Enemy the next season. We now draw out every man that is able to bear arms.> 17CC143-144

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:09:05 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24498
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24498


1783

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John Floyd to William Preston, Beargrass KY, 3/28/1783: <I Sincerely thank you for your very friendly adonition concerning my personal safety; & I mean always to take your advice when it is in my power; but I have sometimes found it absolutely necessary to desend below my station in a command, in order to preserve the country in which I have my little Family. Your anxiety for my welfare is more I am afraid than I deserve but I shall remember it with gratitude.> <We have endeavored to stick to surveying but have been so often interrupted by the Savages that we have made but little progress.> Mentions a friend -- William Buchanan -- badly wounded and left by his own men for dead: <I have long expected something like this to be my own lott; & if the war is continued much longer I can hardly escape, tho' I am now determined to be more cautious than I have been heretofore yet every man in this country must be more or less exposed to danger.> [Floyd was killed by Indians on 4/12/1783 a short distance from his station at Beargrass.] 17CC147-149

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:11:11 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24499
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24499


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Nathaniel Hart [Sr], undated memos: <I claim 1400 acres of land on the head of Silver Creek including my two Fields By settlement & preemption. The money was sent down for the warrant by Daniel Boone, & lost when he was robbed. He is now to bring the warrant, and I am to lose the money Boone was robbed of, Except he recovers it by suit.> <I claim some part of a preemption & settlement on the Panter Creek which I obtained in favor of Wm. Stagg, who was himself a prisoner at Detroyt when the claim was proved. I sent the money for the warrant by Daniel Boone, which was also lost, & Boone is now to bring a warrant for it which I am to be accountable to him for. And I expect that Stagg will consent when he returns to let me have 1000 acres of it, but that will be discretionary in him.> <I hold 3000 acres of land which was located by Daniel Boone on State warrants. His memorandum will show where it lies. On the north side Licking 15 miles No East of Upper Blue Licks.> 17CC149-150

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:13:14 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24500
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24500


1780

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Nathaniel Hart [Sr] undated memo: <The price of corn at Boonesborough at that time [LCD: 3/1780] was 200$ per Bushel. . . .> 17CC150

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:14:10 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24501
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24501


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane note: <W[illiam] P. H[art] remarked that his father [Nathaniel Hart Sr.] had little confidence in his [Daniel Boone's] honesty and integrity. When I suggested that he had not the evidence of rascality which arose from success, he replied that Boone was no surveyor -- he did his surveying with the eye, and by stepping off the distances -- at the angles thus taken.> 17CC158

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:15:09 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24502
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24502


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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BOONEMSS to Col. Richard Henderson, 4/1/1775: <April the first, 1775. <Dear Colonel, <After my compliments to you, I shall acquaint you of our misfortune. On March the 25th, a party of Indians fired on my company about half an hour before day, and killed Mr. Twitty and his negro, and wounded Mr. Walker very deeply but I hope he will recover. On March the 28th, as we were hunting for provisions, we found Samuel Tate's son, who gave us an account that the Indians fired on their camp [Draper: "Perpahs on Tate's Creek, between Silver Creek and Boonesborough, and so named in consequence of this attack on Tate's camp upon its waters."] on the 27th day. My brother and I went down and found two men killed and SCULPED, Thomas McDowell and Jeremiah McFeeters. I have sent a man down to all the lower companies [Draper: "These companies were doubtless Harrod's at Harrodstown and Boiling Spring, the McAfees on Salt River, and perhaps McClelland's at the Royal Spring on Elkhorn, and Hinkson's on Licking.] in order to gather them all to the mouth of Otter Creek. My advice to you Sir, is, to come or send as soon as possible. Your company is desired greatly, for the people are very uneasy, but are willing to stay and venture their lives with you; and now is the time to FLUSTERATE their [the Indians?] intentions, and keep the country whilst we are in it. If we give way to them now, it will ever be the case. <This day we start from the battle ground, for the mouth of Otter Creek, where we shall immediately erect a fort, which will be done before you can come or send; then we can send ten men to meet you, if you send for them. <I am, Sir, your most obedient, <Daniel Boone. <N.B. -- We stood on the ground and guarded our baggage till day, and lost nothing. We have about fifteen miles to CANTUCK, at Otter Creek.> 3B179-80 and 17CC166-167; another copy in BOONENTS, COLLINS

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:16:33 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24503
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24503


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Nathaniel Hart [Jr], memo written on the back of a copy of Floyd to Preston, 1/1775 [a letter I don't have]: <Boone was on his way from the treaty ground, when he wrote the enclosed letter [BOONEMSS 4/1/1775]. The treaty was not completed until March, 1775. Boone came ahead of Col. Henderson.> 17CC170

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:17:43 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24504
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24504


1779-10-30

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John Floyd to William Preston, Harrodsburg KY, 10/30/1779: <My wife [Jenny] brought out the little boy without any of my assistance, and neither of them were any trouble on the way. I lost neither horse nor cow, but my trouble in driving them here was too much. I am this morning gathering up my affairs to set out for Beargrass in high spirits. The commissioners are here, and I procured my certificate yesterday for 1400 acres at Woodstock, and was immediately offered six fine young Virginia born negroes for it. You never saw such keenness as is here about land. I am vexed that I am forced to send your warrants back to be renewed before I can get them surveyed -- do send them out again as soon as possible. . . . The court moves to the falls next week, and I am desirous to be there in order to get places for Capt. [Rowland] Madison & Mr. Johnson. I see many selling their claims here and I think they will do the same there. . . . Corn is 30 dollars per bushel.> 17CC184-185

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:19:15 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24505
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24505


1779-11-26

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John Floyd to William Preston, Beargrass KY, 11/26/1779: <I arrived here the 8th inst. with all my family and stock, safe and hearty. I have this day got a fine cabbin raised, and hope in a few days to have a shelter something better than a tent which we have laid in almost ten weeks. I should not have been quite so tedious in building, but the first tree Bob cut down on the place lodged and slipped back on the stump and tore off his right foot, or at least all the skin and flesh from his ancle [sic] down. I have nothing to dress it, and am persuaded it must rot off what is left. I have no view now but to grub and maul, which I think I can do with the greatest cheerfulness on so fine a tract of land. Had I not better take the six negroes for Woodstock to work this? I am writing by fire light and I fear you cannot read it. The commissioners are sitting at the falls; when I hear how they settle preemptions I shall try to purchase for Capt. Madison. I have no bread provided yet, but I hope to get some corn from Boonsborough by water. It cant be bought here for 50 dollars per bushel. I have the greatest plenty of meat. Salt 200 dollars or 10 days work. L300 was given for Knox's 1400 acres on this Creek, which he claimed by settlement &c. and the land really poor. Popular Grove pleases me as well as before. Many are the cabins on it, and I found 11 on mine. . . . The falls is sickly, and the land act drives them off by hundreds. I have had no time to attend the commissioners here. . . . I am in a dangerous situation -- only five men, and the Indians killed or took a man from Bullitt's Lick and wounded another since I came here. My company all disappointed me in coming out, but I have no doubt of settlers enough from the falls as many are preparing to join me here.> 17CC186-187

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:20:16 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24506
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24506


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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From Nathaniel Hart [Sr.], Transylvania Company Account Book, 1775-1777: Michael Stoner, account opened 4/29/1775. 8/11/1775: <Cr. by 70 days work in making road to Cantucky.> 1/10/1776: <Cr. By six days ranging under Jesse Benton.> 17CC191

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:22:15 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24507
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24507


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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From Nathaniel Hart [Sr.], Transylvania Company Account Book, 1775-1777: Samuel Tate, account opened 4/29/1775. 8/8/1775: <Cr. By Canoe brought up for Rd. Henderson. . . . Cr. By Meat & hunting for Jno. Luttrell.> 17CC191

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:23:17 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24508
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24508


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Comments of Nathaniel Hart [Jr.], a boy at Boonesborough in the 1780s, to John D. Shane: <Col. Harrod was not a religious man. He sometimes got to drinking and gambling, and in these spells would sometimes lose large amounts. Old Jno. Reed, Judge Green's grandfather, won L600 from him in one night, by what was called the "3 plot one." There was a suit about it. . . . Col. Harrod was unable to write, perhaps not able to read.> Hart told an anecdote in which Harrod pretended to read a letter, but held it upside down. Harrod, like most of his men, came to KY a bachelor; in 1779 he married a widow woman, Mr. McDaniel, whose father, husband, and brother, had been killed by the Indians. They had one child, a red-head, <which was imputed to a Mahon and not to Col. Harrod. Indeed, this was acknowledged by Mrs. Harrod. Col. Harrod gave Mahon 200 acres of land, in which Mrs. Harrod afterwards calimed her dower, which was thought rascally, after her acknowledgement of their intercourse.> 17CC192

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:25:00 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24509
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24509


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Comments of Nathaniel Hart [Jr.], a boy at Boonesborough in the 1780s, to John D. Shane: The girls did not see the Indians <till they popped up by the side of them, in the canoe. They took the 1st to be Simon, a yellow man, who staid at the Fort: and one of them exclaimed, "Law Simon! How you [scared -- word smudged by mark out on other side of page] me!" Immediately after, two other indians popped up, and they saw who Simon was then.> 17CC192

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:26:44 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24510
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24510


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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From Nathaniel Hart [Sr.], Transylvania Company Account Book, 1775-1777: Account opened 6/26/1775. 7/27/2775: <Dr to 1 peck of salt, delivered at Block-House.> The Block-House was 28 miles west of Abingdon. <Cr. By hunting for Henderson, Hart, & Luttrell L3/0/0. <By part of an Elk-skin 3s <By John Williams, for shoeing horses 7s <By John Luttrell, for shoeing horse on Nelson's work 8d> Nathaniel Hart [Jr.] told John D. Shane that Squire Boone was employed shoeing horses at Boonesborough in 1775-76. 17CC194

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:29:16 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24511
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24511


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Comments of Nathaniel Hart [Jr.] to John D. Shane: <I was personally acquainted with him [DB]. He has given the best account of himself. He lived in North Carolina, near the Red-House in Casewell County [sic]. It is disputed whether he was a Virginian. Some say he was a Pennsylvanian. When he returned from this country, on his first trip, his wife met him weeping. Supposing that he was dead, she had become pregnant. To which he made some such reply as that the race would be continued. She continued, that it was by his brother. "So much the better," says he, "its all in the family." Boone's daughter (Susy Boone) [was] a notorious prostitute. Said every Kentuckian ought to try her gait, since she was the first white woman in Ky.> 17CC195

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:31:43 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24512
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24512


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Comments of Nathaniel Hart [Jr.] to John D. Shane: McGary was one of the most <low-lived men as ever lived. McGary, 'twas said, would raise a bastard child, and then seduce her.> 17CC195

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:33:28 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24513
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24513


1782

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Comments of Nathaniel Hart [Jr.] to John D. Shane: During the siege of Bryan's Station in 8/1782 <He, with 6 others, went into the Fort under a heavy fire from the Indians. The men in the fort, suspecting who they were, threw open the doors as they came.> 17CC197

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:35:19 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24514
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24514


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Comments of Nathaniel Hart [Jr.] to John D. Shane: <A good many of those men [who worked on the road] went off, and sold their improvements, and never came to the country again.> 17CC197

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:37:31 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24515
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24515


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Long Siege Comments of Nathaniel Hart [Jr.] to John D. Shane: Richard Callaway <swore he would kill the first man who proposed a surrender.> 17CC198

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:39:08 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24516
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24516


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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From Nathaniel Hart [Sr.], Transylvania Company Account Book, 1775-1777: William Crabtree, account opened 4/24/1775. Nathaniel Hart [Jr.] commented to John D. Shane: <Never heard of Crabtree in this country after he came to it.> But NB the Isaac Crabtree involved in the Wallenridge massacre and the killing of a Cherokee on Watagua, and the Crabtree among the roadmakers and defenders of Boonesborough -- related? 17CC202

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:40:46 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24517
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24517


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Comments of Nathaniel Hart [Jr.] to John D. Shane: Thomas Brooks Moved from Boonesborough to Limestone. <He is said to have offered a man a guinea to fight him. The man is said to have taken it, and to have given him a great whipping.> 17CC203

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:41:53 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24518
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24518


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Comments of Nathaniel Hart [Jr.] to John D. Shane: "Hynes" <was a free-negro: and as good a soldier as any we had. Secured a fine tract of Land, called Hynes bent, 5 miles below Boonsboro. He was a respectable negro; and owned horses, stock, &c. He was killed by the Indians.> 17CC203

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:43:07 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24519
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24519


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Comments of Nathaniel Hart [Jr] to John D. Shane: Upon <Boone's return in '70 . . . [he] brought intelligence, which it is supposed stirred up the enterprise of Henderson & co. None of them had seen the country which they purchased. They took it entirely upon Boone's representation; he gave the boundaries. Hence the origin of the Company is to be attributed to Boon's representations.> 17CC204

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:44:17 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24520
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24520


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Comments of Nathaniel Hart [Jr] to John D. Shane: He <was a self-made man, a lawyer, like Patrick Henry. He died of Intemperance.> 17CC204

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:45:11 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24521
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24521


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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List of names from Nathaniel Hart [Sr.], Transylvania Company Account Book, 1775-1777: James Aldridge William Barton David Burney Richard Burke Squire Boone Daniel Boone Jesse Benton Edward Bradley William Baird James Berrey Anthony Bledsoe John Brown Joshua Barton, Sr. Major Wm. Beesley G. John Blount John Bonde Jacob Beaufman William Blevens Thomas Brooks William Cocke Samuel Coubern Richard Callaway John Cowan William Crabtree Flanders Callaway Thomas Carlin William Cooper Tilman Creddlebaugh Azariah Davis William Dill James Corchester John Daugherty Thomas Dagley James Easley Daniel Easley John Farrar John Floyd David Findly William Frazer Dominick Flanigan James Gilmore David Gass Daniel Goodman James Gallaway John Gordon James Harrod Samuel Henderson Richard Henderson Nathaniel Hart Nathaniel Henderson Richard Hogan William Hagg William Hays Thomas Hart Nathaniel Hill William Hendrie William Hawkin William Hudson Richard Harrison Leonard Helms Hymes Hinkston James Jett James Jones James King John King Moses Kirkpatrick John Kennady Thomas Lovdal[?] John Luttrell Aaron Lewis James Lea James Leeper John Laird William Moore James Matthews William McWhinney Hugh McGary John Mann Joel Matthews John Martin David McGee John McMillan Francis McConnell Elijah Nunn Edward Nelson Alexander Neeley Waller Overtow Page Portwood George Poff Benjamin Pettit Robert Paris Thomas Pettit Samuel Picking John Pillow Thomas Quirk Pemberton Rollins Isaac Rollstone Peter Renfroe Charles Robertson Nathaniel Randolph Michael Stoner Moses Stanley Thomas Slaughter Julius Saunders Willis Spawn Matthew Sullivan William B. Smith William Stagg Samuel Tate Isaac Thrasher Barnett Tatum Oswell Towns Richard Thomas John Todd Benjamin Vanclief Ralph William Joel Walker John Granville William William Whitley John Wilson Hugh Wilson William Wilson Charles Williams 17CC189-190

File: 17CC1.DR2




    Created: 6/27/2017 11:46:28 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24522
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24522


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Nathaniel Hart [Jr], a boy at Boonesborough in the 1780s, comments to John D. Shane: His father engaged in a brief encounter with Indians along the Wilderness Road; Indians fled, leaving their budgets. Inside he found, among other things, <a soup bowl made of cane-splits, and so close that it would hold soup, a very piece of workmanship; a piece of wire which was twisted so as to have a spring to it, and with which they drew their beards; looking-glasses; &c.> 17CC206

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:50:20 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24523
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24523


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Nathaniel Hart [Jr], a boy at Boonesborough in the 1780s, comments to John D. Shane: <All the bread we had on first coming to the fort (Boonesboro) was made in a mortar, standing in the middle of the fort, in which the grain was beaten with a pestle, moved by a long sweep, and at opposite ends, up and down. . . . The next improvement was a hand-mill. The runners made of limestone, about a foot or 18 inches across, and 4 or 5 inches thick. They were made light, so as to be turned by the hand. The lower, was fastened into a gurn; upon this, the upper one was turned by means of a little handle. The gurn took the place of the mortar, and was kept in constant motion, always going, day & night, as this was necessary, in order to the supply of the fort.> 17CC206

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:54:01 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24524
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24524


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Nathaniel Hart [Jr], a boy at Boonesborough in the 1780s, comments to John D. Shane: The Bryans were <very active in opposing something like a fee-bill law in '72 or '73. An open resistance being made, Gov. martin issued a proclamation under which Capt Hart [his father] served, and they were subdued. They were now obliged to take the oath of allegiance. They were called regulators. In '75 when the Revolution broke out, they had scruples of conscience, from having taken this oath, and the whole family came out to the West. Many of them, however, returned, on the restoration of peace. They were men of strong minds, though of not much education.> 17CC208

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:56:19 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24526
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24526


1780

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John Floyd to William Preston, Bear Grass KY, 1/19/1780: <When I attempted to write in Dec. the Ink froze in the pen and it is no better yet, as the Snow has never melted off the south side of the cabbin since the first of last month. I think it cannot be as cold at the Meadows as here but it is certainly an uncommon winter as the cane seems to be all dead by the hard frosts.> 17CC120

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/27/2017 11:56:25 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24496
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24496


1787

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Treaty of 1787 Col. Logan's reply to the speech of Captain Johnny, 1: <I now speak to the head warriors and chiefs of the Snawane nation. Friends and Brothers. I hope we have met here in peace -- and in the first place; to consider the tedious and bloody war we have been engaged in with each other. You may well remember, that ten years ago, we were all governed by one king, over the great waters. But it hath so happened, that our farher the king, and the great men of Congress of the United States, commenced a war, as your father the king engaged you on his part, and the Congress engaged us on their part. And you and us living nearly in one country, it hath been our fortune to attack each other, and have spilt much blood in our land, many of our people have fell into your hands, and some of your people have fell into our hands. <Brothers. You may see plainly, how your father over the water, that engaged you in so long and bloody a war, hath treated you that altho' you lost many brave warriors, yet when he got beat by the great men of the United States, he made a peace, and gave your country away, & said nothing about you, but left you to the discretion of the Americans, to treat you as they pleased. <Brothers. You, and all the red people may plainly see, when your father & all his forces, together with all your, could not comquer the Americans, that it will be in vain for you (the red people) to continue a war yourselves alone, it is true, you may kill a few old man and old women, in idfferent parts of the country, but this will do you no service, but harm; for we then can go to all the towns in your country, and destroy all your living. <Brothers. Let us not think of those bloody designs any longer, let us live at peace and prevent your old father the king from laughing at us, when we are fighting & destroying one another, and think he will get our country for his own people.> continued

File: 18CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/29/2017 6:12:25 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24535
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24535


1787

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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People
None.
Treaty of 1787 Col. Logan's reply to the speech of Captain Johnny, 2: <Brothers. There is a great many designing men in this country, and some may encourage you to go to war, because they know if you do, that you will be drove out of the country, and then they can go and live where you do, and laugh how they have fooled you. This will surely be the case, & it is you and us must fight the battle. When your country will lie waste, then the Americans will sell it, but if you will live at peace, and keep possession of it, I expect the people of the United States in America, will not take it from you, so you can be a happy people, & live in your own land. As to the prisoners, I am sorry you have not got the young Prince, but he lives very well. I hope this is not the last time we are to see each other, or to exchange prisoners. Our desire is to have our prisoners, whose names we gave in to you, and after they are exchanged, they that have prisoners with you, must purchase them from you as they can. The names of those prisoners that we gave you, their people were at the taking of the prisoners from you, they shewed themselves like men, and warriors, for that reason we gave them the preference. When I do any business of this kind I call on the great man above, to judge men, that I dao all things right. I have considered your request in returning the young Pickaway woman and your getting the young Prince, it appears to me it was their fortune to be both taken at one time -- they were equal to me, and I, not knowing you wished one more than and ther, it has been her fortune to be brought here, now for me to send her back, and bring the young Prince away from his mother, is giving me a great deal of trouble, and I think the great man above will not think it justice, and for that reason I cannot do it; but you may be assured, your Prince will be well treated, and he shall be delivered at the next exchange, and you need not be at any trouble, only send the prisoners to Limestone, where Mr. Jacob Boone will receive them, and sen yours to you. I have no more to say to you, only advise you to go home and live at peace; and I will assure you no army shall march against you from Kentucke. <I am not authorized to treat any farther with you -- only wish a friendly trade could be carried on between us. I hope what has been said, will be agreeable to you, and you and I will set our names thereto.> Signed: Benjamin Logan, Captain Johnny, Pemenaway, Mauernocho, Lathensecak; witnesses: Isaac Ruddell, John Crow, Daniel Boone. Copied by John Shane from the KENTUCKY GAZETTE 8/25/1787. 18CC8-9

File: 18CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/29/2017 6:13:15 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24536
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24536


1788

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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"Agricola" to KENTUCKY GAZETTE 3/8/1788. Very pleased that Filson has announced his new academy; plans sound great. <But, here, Sir, we labour under an unhappy disadvantage. In my neighbourhood all are illiterate, and unaccustomed to high flowery language or abstract reasonings. Your sentiments are, many of them, so new; your stile is so lofty; your periods are so lengthy, & crowded with such a variety of matter, your conclusions are often so remote from their premises, and relatives quite out of sight of their antecedents, that we are totally lost in the maze, and the longest live of our understandings are not able to fathom the depths of such erudition.> <What peculiar charm have NORTHERN teachers to inspire virtue, suppress vice, and explode all party spirit that southern teachers do not posess?> 18CC15-17

File: 18CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/29/2017 6:16:27 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24537
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24537


1788

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Announcement of his new academy, 1/19/1788: <The public has been informed that a Seminary is proposed in Lexington. In a consultation of the respectable inhabitants upon that subject, there appeared a proper spirit of encouragement: every gentleman present was suitably impressed with the importance of the plan, and seriously wished the accomplishment. Many valuable advantages will probably arise from this institution, as the situation will be popular & healthy, in the center of a fertile country, where accommodations for students may be had at the lowest rates. The teachers are determined to pay the strictest attention to their pupils, and hope their success will merit encouragement. With the discipline of northern teachers, to suppress every species of vice and immorality, and give the greatest encouragement to the spirit & practice of virtue; party spirit wil be exploded, and to instruct in the general system of Christianity only, considered as their indispensible duty.> Some might think the country a better place for a school, but there are good arguments for the city: <this is obvious from a view of a country student walking out of school, he carelessly hulks his body along in clownish gestures, pays no respect to a genteel movement, from a consciousness that no eye beholds him, fears not the contempt or ridicule which must be consequent upon such a conduct in a respectable town.> KENTUCKY GAZETTE 1/19/1788 18CC130-132

File: 18CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/29/2017 6:18:12 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24538
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24538


1788

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Reply to "Agricola": <You have taken the liverty to animadvert upon the publication of the intended seminary, proposing a few silly and impertinent questions, which I shall take no notice of. YOur officious performance Reflects no reputation, indicating a spirit of altercation, which in every attitude I view with contempt. As you have been so personal with me, you will please to leave your proper name with the Printer and oblige -- John Filson.> KENTUCKY GAZETTE 4/19/1788 18CC133

File: 18CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/29/2017 6:20:09 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24539
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24539


1788

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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"Agricola" replies to Filson's reply: <Sir, You have taken the liverty to animadvert upon the (viz. my) publication of the intended seminary, proposing a silly and impertinent question, which I shall take no notice of. Your officious performance reflects no reputation, indicating a spirit of altercation, which in every attitude, I view with contempt.> KENTUCKY GAZETTE 5/17/1788 18CC133

File: 18CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/29/2017 6:23:41 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24540
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24540


1787

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Treaty of 1787 Speech by Captain Johnny of the Shawnees, 8/20/1787: <We have sent for Logan to let him know our opinions. He shall soon know our opinion from our very hearts. I heard your words by which I wasy informed not to be afraid to come in and exchange for my prisoners. I was not afraid, but our people is scattered so far apart that it took me a great deal of trouble, to which I made all industry I could to get all the prisoners I could from our young Brothers, for which I was two months out at the Wabash towns amongst the rest of our young Brothers, which I found out their opinion, all those that had prisoners said they would not give them up to their brothers the big-knife, which was one half the Towns, those that had none, plead to take pity on the women and children, to give them up to get their prisoners from the white people. When I was there, I looked back where I lived, where our old towns was, I looked to be alone, or like a man among children. I could by no means get prisoners from the others. I heard our brothers word and believed it, and meant to come in myself. All my town is for peace, the one half of the Picaway town, and the half of Chilocotha Town, the half of Cespico town also, and the half of Wacatomica, of which all say, let us take pity on our women and children, and agree to make a peace with our brother, the big-knife, which our brother, the big-knife have always said was in our power, if we want peace we shall have peace, to which we are agreed, to come back, to where our old town was burnt, and live like brothers. These other Indians that are for war, they will be always out on the Wabash, and will make a distinction between ourselves, to let our brother big-knife know we are for real peace. Here will be five little towns of us that will be for peace, & will trade to our brother big knife, and use all industry we can to get as many prisoners as we can. Our women has talked to us to take pity on them, and to make a peace, that we may live in peace and plenty. When we heard their speech, we took pity on them, all that is now for peace. These others that are for war, took no pity on their women and children. We want to let our women and children live in peace and plenty. Now we took it on ourselves to be as poor people, on account as the rest of our brothers would take no pity on us to get our prisoners, but we hope through time, we will be able to redress them all -- then we will live in peace and plenty like brothers. All our young main chiefs are for peace. Of them other Towns there is none but some wild young fellows that will be out on the Wabash, that will be for war. We cannot do anything with them.> Copied by John Shane from the KENTUCKY GAZETTE, 8/25/1787. 18CC7

File: 18CC1.DR2



    Created: 6/29/2017 6:25:07 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24534
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24534


1787

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Treaty of 1787 Speech by Captain Johnny of the Shawnees, 8/20/1787 1: <We have sent for Logan to let him know our opinions. He shall soon know our opinion from our very hearts. I heard your words by which I wasy informed not to be afraid to come in and exchange for my prisoners. I was not afraid, but our people is scattered so far apart that it took me a great deal of trouble, to which I made all industry I could to get all the prisoners I could from our young Brothers, for which I was two months out at the Wabash towns amongst the rest of our young Brothers, which I found out their opinion, all those that had prisoners said they would not give them up to their brothers the big-knife, which was one half the Towns, those that had none, plead to take pity on the women and children, to give them up to get their prisoners from the white people. When I was there, I looked back where I lived, where our old towns was, I looked to be alone, or like a man among children. I could by no means get prisoners from the others. I heard our brothers word and believed it, and meant to come in myself.> continued

File: 18CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/29/2017 6:28:24 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24541
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24541


1787

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Treaty of 1787 Speech by Captain Johnny of the Shawnees, 8/20/1787 2: <All my town is for peace, the one half of the Picaway town, and the half of Chilocotha Town, the half of Cespico town also, and the half of Wacatomica, of which all say, let us take pity on our women and children, and agree to make a peace with our brother, the big-knife, which our brother, the big-knife have always said was in our power, if we want peace we shall have peace, to which we are agreed, to come back, to where our old town was burnt, and live like brothers. These other Indians that are for war, they will be always out on the Wabash, and will make a distinction between ourselves, to let our brother big-knife know we are for real peace. Here will be five little towns of us that will be for peace, & will trade to our brother big knife, and use all industry we can to get as many prisoners as we can. Our women has talked to us to take pity on them, and to make a peace, that we may live in peace and plenty. When we heard their speech, we took pity on them, all that is now for peace. These others that are for war, took no pity on their women and children. We want to let our women and children live in peace and plenty. Now we took it on ourselves to be as poor people, on account as the rest of our brothers would take no pity on us to get our prisoners, but we hope through time, we will be able to redress them all -- then we will live in peace and plenty like brothers. All our young main chiefs are for peace. Of them other Towns there is none but some wild young fellows that will be out on the Wabash, that will be for war. We cannot do anything with them.> Copied by John Shane from the KENTUCKY GAZETTE, 8/25/1787. 18CC7

File: 18CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/29/2017 6:29:59 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24542
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24542


1787

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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People
None.
Treaty of 1787 Col. Logan's reply to the speech of Captain Johnny, 1: <I now speak to the head warriors and chiefs of the Snawane nation. Friends and Brothers. I hope we have met here in peace -- and in the first place; to consider the tedious and bloody war we have been engaged in with each other. You may well remember, that ten years ago, we were all governed by one king, over the great waters. But it hath so happened, that our farher the king, and the great men of Congress of the United States, commenced a war, as your father the king engaged you on his part, and the Congress engaged us on their part. And you and us living nearly in one country, it hath been our fortune to attack each other, and have spilt much blood in our land, many of our people have fell into your hands, and some of your people have fell into our hands. <Brothers. You may see plainly, how your father over the water, that engaged you in so long and bloody a war, hath treated you that altho' you lost many brave warriors, yet when he got beat by the great men of the United States, he made a peace, and gave your country away, & said nothing about you, but left you to the discretion of the Americans, to treat you as they pleased. <Brothers. You, and all the red people may plainly see, when your father & all his forces, together with all your, could not comquer the Americans, that it will be in vain for you (the red people) to continue a war yourselves alone, it is true, you may kill a few old man and old women, in idfferent parts of the country, but this will do you no service, but harm; for we then can go to all the towns in your country, and destroy all your living. <Brothers. Let us not think of those bloody designs any longer, let us live at peace and prevent your old father the king from laughing at us, when we are fighting & destroying one another, and think he will get our country for his own people.> continued

File: 18CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/29/2017 6:31:36 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24543
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24543


1787

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
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People
None.
Treaty of 1787 Col. Logan's reply to the speech of Captain Johnny, 2: <Brothers. There is a great many designing men in this country, and some may encourage you to go to war, because they know if you do, that you will be drove out of the country, and then they can go and live where you do, and laugh how they have fooled you. This will surely be the case, & it is you and us must fight the battle. When your country will lie waste, then the Americans will sell it, but if you will live at peace, and keep possession of it, I expect the people of the United States in America, will not take it from you, so you can be a happy people, & live in your own land. As to the prisoners, I am sorry you have not got the young Prince, but he lives very well. I hope this is not the last time we are to see each other, or to exchange prisoners.> continued

File: 18CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/29/2017 6:33:59 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24544
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24544


1787

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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People
None.
Treaty of 1787 Col. Logan's reply to the speech of Captain Johnny, 3: <Our desire is to have our prisoners, whose names we gave in to you, and after they are exchanged, they that have prisoners with you, must purchase them from you as they can. The names of those prisoners that we gave you, their people were at the taking of the prisoners from you, they shewed themselves like men, and warriors, for that reason we gave them the preference. When I do any business of this kind I call on the great man above, to judge men, that I dao all things right. I have considered your request in returning the young Pickaway woman and your getting the young Prince, it appears to me it was their fortune to be both taken at one time -- they were equal to me, and I, not knowing you wished one more than and ther, it has been her fortune to be brought here, now for me to send her back, and bring the young Prince away from his mother, is giving me a great deal of trouble, and I think the great man above will not think it justice, and for that reason I cannot do it; but you may be assured, your Prince will be well treated, and he shall be delivered at the next exchange, and you need not be at any trouble, only send the prisoners to Limestone, where Mr. Jacob Boone will receive them, and sen yours to you. I have no more to say to you, only advise you to go home and live at peace; and I will assure you no army shall march against you from Kentucke. <I am not authorized to treat any farther with you -- only wish a friendly trade could be carried on between us. I hope what has been said, will be agreeable to you, and you and I will set our names thereto.> Signed: Benjamin Logan, Captain Johnny, Pemenaway, Mauernocho, Lathensecak; witnesses: Isaac Ruddell, John Crow, Daniel Boone. Copied by John Shane from the KENTUCKY GAZETTE 8/25/1787. 18CC8-9

File: 18CC2.DR2



    Created: 6/29/2017 6:35:26 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-24545
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-24545


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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BCAPTIVITY2 John Shane statement of Septimus Schull, grandson of Daniel Boone, written for his children, ca. 1833: <Boone was taken, at the time he was making salt, at the Lower Blue Licks. He surrendered his men, on condition that they should not be made to run the gauntlet. They stacked their arms, and then the indians made Boone run. He made no treaty for himself. He butted down the big indian and got through. . . . At Detroit the other prisoners were exchanged, but the indians had refused to part with Boone. The English gave him a horse and saddle, and told the indians they must let no one take them from him. Boone made his escape from captivity, and got home the very day of Squire Boone's getting back from N.C.> 11CC52

File: 11CC1.DR1



    Created: 9/14/2017 3:10:14 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-28803
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-28803


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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OLDBOONE John Shane interview of Mr. Wigginton, ca. 1843-49: Lived at Cross-Plains in 1788, where <he rented land of Samuel Boon, son of Sammy Boon, Dan'l Boon's brother, but never saw old Boon.> 11CC24

File: 11CC1.DR1



    Created: 9/14/2017 3:10:49 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-28804
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-28804


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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BCAPTIVITY2 John D. Shane interview with Mrs. Samuel Scott, ca. 1843-49: <While Boone was prisoner, Mrs. Boone, and her daughter and son in law, spent a day or two there [at Moore's Fort on the Clinch] on their way in to Carolina.> 11CC226

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 9/14/2017 3:21:52 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-28805
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-28805


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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John D. Shane interview with William Clinkinbeard, ca: 1843-49, 2: <Had to cross a little prairie before we came to the 2d town (Pickaway, on Mad river) little better than 1/4 mile from the town. I was pioneer to cut a road for the cannon, that day. When they got in sight of P. they divided. Clarke ordered Logan to surround the town, in order that if any were there, they might not escape. There was another town right up in the forks of Mad river. This town was below the forks. Logan included the upper town in his circuit, & so never got to us till it was all over. While we went thro' that prairie, the indians fired upon us from their cabins. Could see them come out of their cabins as unconcerned as I would go out of my door, and shoot. Held their guns too high. Could hear them biz! biz! over us. Clark had 2 cannona. He met us at the woods. The Battle lasted about 2 hours. The indians than gave way. We never found 1 of their dead. We killed a white-man dressed fine in indian dress. Cousin to Genl. Clark. Had been wounded, & was making his way in to our camp, and was shot. Had gone to live with the indians; when, I don't know. We lost 12 men, & had some wounded. Buried our dead in the cabins, & burnt the cabins over them. Heard afterwards that the indians dug them all up. All was as one town, called the P[ickaway] town. I reckon there were 3 columns of us that went out about a mile from the P. town the 1st night, & lay without fire all night. If the indians came on the camp, we were to attack them on their rear. But the inaidns never came back after we drove them from that thicket. We couldn't pack roasting ears, & we had no provision to pack, & so we couldn't go farther; & had to return. Returned the way we had come: Reckon we had a 1000 men. . . . We crossed on Clark's boats. No plunder in 1780 but the horses. We couldn't carry their skins & furs, & so burned them up. We went there in a mighty hurry. Travelled nearly all night the last night, without any fire, & next morning got to the Old Chillicothe town by 10 o'clock. They never built up the Old Chillicothe or Pickaway towns again.> 11CC66

File: 11CC2.DR2



    Created: 9/14/2017 3:22:17 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-28806
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-28806


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series CC, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Nathaniel Hart [Jr], a boy at Boonesborough in the 1780s, comments to John D. Shane: <The women could read the character of a man with invariable certainty. If he lacked courage, they seemed to be able to discover it, at a glance. And if a man was found to be a coward, he stood a poor chance to get his washing, or mending, or anything done.> 17CC207

File: 17CC1.DR2



    Created: 9/14/2017 3:42:43 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22301-28807
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22301-28807














    

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