Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

1791-12-13

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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12/13/1791: DB to Gov. Henry Lee, an alternate, longer, but cleaned-up version: <Sir <For Kanhaway county 68 privates: <Leonard Cooper, Captn. at Point Pleasant 17 men. <Joel Dawe, ensign, at Bellville 17 men. <John Young, Leutenant, at Elk, 17 men. <John Morris Jr., Ensign, at the Boat Yards, 17 men. <Two spies or scouts will be necessary at the Point, to search the banks of the river at the crossing places; more would be wanting if they could be allowed. Those spies must be composed of the inhabitants who well know the woods and waters from the Point to Bellville, sixty miles, no inhabitants. From Elk to the Boat Yards 20 miles, all inhabited. <As some person must carry out the amunition to Red Stone, if your Excellency should have thought me a proper person, I would undertake it on condition I have the appointment to victual the company at Kanhaway, so that I could take down the flour as I passed that place. <I am your Excellency's most obiedient humble servant, <Danl. Boone.> 13S21

File: 13S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 12:32:43 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24122
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24122


1791-12-12

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Amunition sent forward by DB, appointed 12/12/1791to provide supplies for Capt. Caperton's company for Greenbriar and Kenhawa counties. 13S22

File: 13S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 12:34:26 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24123
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24123


1793

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Col. George Clendinen to ?, Kenhawa, 1/31/1793: <On the failure of Col. Daniel Boone, I was compelled to make some arrangements for the support of Lieut. Cooper's detachment of Capt. Caperton's company, stationed at the mouth of Kenhawa, or they must have been disbanded.> On advising with Col. Thomas Lewis <I found there was no preson in the county that could do the business with as great as Mr. Allyn Pryor, having formed connections & credit with all the flour manufacturers as high up the Ohio as Fort Pitt,> and hence appointed him. LCD memo: <Hence I infer, that Col. Boone's "failure" arose probably from the fact that he had not the credit, & Va most likely did not advance means to procure supplies, wh. had to be obtained at a great distance above. Boone wanted money to go back from Richmond early in January 1792 via Fort Pitt, I infer, to boy flour -- at all events he wanted pay in advance for conducting the public amunition to Ft. Pitt, & perhaps that he wihed to buy flour with.> In 1793 Pryor, DB's sucessor as supplier, wrote of his great difficulty in procuring flour: water low, mills can't grind, river very low, difficult to get even empty canoes along. LCD: <Hence may infer some of Col. Boone's difficulties which caused his "failure."> 13S59-60,77

File: 13S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 12:35:54 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24124
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24124


1782

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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6/25/1782: <On recommendation, Daniel Boone is appointed Sheriff of Fayette Couunty.> Draper's notes from the VA Archives, 13S150

File: 13S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 12:37:12 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24125
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24125


1793-12-24

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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12/24/1793: $25 to DB for curing and attending Andrew Fleming, a soldier in Lt. Mann's company; refered to the auditor for settlement in the usual way. Draper's notes from the VA Archives, 13S152

File: 13S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 12:39:45 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24126
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24126


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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session 10/15/1787-6/8/1788; DB, with other members from KY district had leave, 11/19/1787 to bring in a bill establishing ferries in KY. In Dec. DB voted in the majority to approve a bill repealling any acts in force "repugnant to the treaty of peace between the United States and the King of Great Britian;" the point of this was to remove any impediment to the collection of debts; DB also voted for an amendment that suspended the operation of this act until Britian complied with the treaty by surrendering the western forts. 13S186-87

File: 13S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 12:41:22 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24127
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24127


1776

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Harrodsburg Memorial 6/15/1776; 2: <We, therefore, are not willing to obey those, or the authority they have assumed, or indeed so acknowledge any power or prerogative which is not derived from the Convention of Virginia, whose subjects we desire to be considered. Virginia, we conceive, can claim this country with the greatest justice and propriety; it is within the limits of their charter; they fought and gbled for it, and had it not been for the memorable battle at the Great Kanaway, those vast regions had yet continued inaccessible. Nor can we conceive how it is practicable for those men who stile themselves absolute proprietors to settle this country at so great a distance from all the Colonies, and in the neighborhood of some enemy Indians. But should our infant settlement become the object of your deliberations, and be taken under your protection and direction, unto whom we jointly conceive that we belong, every obstacle would be removed, population increase, and of consequence a barrier to the interior parts of Virginia from the Indians. A new source of wealth would then be opened, as trade and navigation under the auspices of Virginia would flourish in this western world. And therefore, willing to acquit our conscience, and not entail slavery upon our posterity by submitting to the pretentions and impositions of the pretended Proprietors, we the inhabitants of the north and the south sides of Kentucke river, having assembled together after preparatory notice on the eighth day of June, 1776, and continued to poll till ye. 15th of the said instant, in order to elect two gentlemen to serve for us in Convention, and by a majority have chosen Captain John Gabriel Jones and Captain George Rogers Clark, and hope your Honorable the Convention will receive them as our delegates from this the Western parts of Fincastle county. And as we sincerely concur in the measures established by the Continental Congress & Colony of Virginia; and willing to the utmost of our abilities to support the present landable laudable cause by raising our quota of men, and hear a proportionable share of the expense that will necessarily accrue in the support of our common liberty.> 14S4-6 continued

File: 14S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 3:42:56 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24178
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24178


1776

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Harrodsburg Memorial 6/15/1776; 2: <And that good order may be observed, we proceeded to elect a Committee consisting of twenty-one members, as already done in West Augusta, and which precedent we rely upon to justify our proceedings to the world; for without law or authority, vice here could take its full scope, having no laws to restrain, or power to control. <Upon the whole, we cheerfully submit to the authority and jurisdiction of this House, not doubting but you will take us under your protection, and give us such directions by our representatives as you, in your great wisdom, may think best. And your petitioners, as in duty bound, &c. <Harrodsburg, June ye 15th, 1775. Signed by order of the inhabitants, <Abraham Hite, Jr., clerk.> 14S6

File: 14S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 3:44:19 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24179
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24179


1776

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Harrodsburg Memorial 6/20/1776; second version, 1: <To the Honorable the Convention of Virginia: <The humble petition of the committee of West Fincastle, of the colony of Virginia, being on the north and south sides of the River Kentucke (or Louisa). Present, John Gabriel Jones, Esqr. Chrirman, John Bowman, John Cowen, William Bennet, Joseph Bowman, John Crittenden, Isaac Hite, George Rogers Clark, Silan Garlan, Hugh McGary, Andrew McConnell, James Harrod, William McConnell, and John Maxwell, gentn. <The inhabitants of this frontier part of Virginia, who are equally desirous of contributint to the untmost of their power to the support of the present laudable cause of American Freedom, and willing to convince and to prove to the world, that tho' they live remote from the Seat of Government, that they feel in the most sensible manner for their suffering brethren, and that they most ardently desire to be looked upon as a part of this Colony, notwithstanding the base proceedings of a detestable, wicked and corrupt Ministry, to prevent any more counties to be laid off, without the inhabitants would be so pusillanimous as to give up their right of appointing proper persons to represent them (in Assembly) or in Convention: And as we further conceive, that as the Proclamation of his Majesty for not settling in the Western parts of this Colony, is not founded upon law, it cannot have any force, and if we submit to that Proclamation, and continue not to lay off new counties on the frontiers that they may send representatives to the Convention, it is leaving an opening to the wicked and diabolical designs of the Ministry, as then this immense and fertile country would afford an assylum to those whose principles are inimical to American Liberty.> 14S6-8 continued

File: 14S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 3:45:44 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24180
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24180


1776

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Harrodsburg Memorial 6/20/1776; second version, 2: <And if new counties are not laid off, as Fincastle county now reaches and already settled upwards of three hundred miles from East to west, it is impossible that two delegates can be sufficient to represent such a repspectable body of people, or that such a number of inhabitants should be bound to obey without being heard; and as those very people would most cheerfully cooperate in every measure tending to the public peace and American Freedom, they have delegated two gentlemen who were chosen by the free voice of the people and which election was held for eight days at Harodsburg (on the western waters of Fincastle on Kentucke) after the preparatory notice of five weeks given to the inhabitants; and on the poll being closed, Captn. John Gabriel Jones and Captain George Rogers Clark having the majority were chosen; and not doubting the acceptance of them as our representatives by the Honorable the Convention, to serve in that capacity, as we conceive the precedent established in West Augusta will justify our proceedings. And we cannot but observe how inpolitic it would be to suffer such a respectable body of prime riflemen to remain even in a state of neutrality, when at this time a certain set of men from North Carolina, stiling themselves Proprietors, & claiming an absolute right to these very lands, taking upon theselves the Legislative authority, commissioning officers both civil and military, having also opened a Land Office, surveyors General & deputies appointed and act, conveyances made, and land sold at an exhorbitant price, with many other unconstitutional practices, tending to disturb the minds of those who are well-disposed to the wholesome Government of Virginia, and creating factions and divisions amongst ourselves, as we have not hitherto been represented in Convention. And as at this time of general danger, we cannot take too much precaution to prevent the inroads of the Savages, & prevent the effusion of innocent blood, we, the Committee, after receiving a message from the chiefs of the Delawares who are now settled near the mouth of the Waubash, informing us that a treaty was to be held at O'Post by the English and Kickapoo Indians, and that they would attend to know the purpose of the same, and if their brothers, the Long Knives would send a man they could rely on, they would, on their return, inform him of the same, as they were apprehensive the Kickapoos would strike their brothers, the Long Knives. Therefore we thought it most prudent, and shall send immediately a certain James Harrod and Garret Rudergrass to converse with them on the same.> 14S8-11 continued

File: 14S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 3:47:08 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24181
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24181


1776

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Harrodsburg Memorial 6/20/1776; second version, 3: <And as it is the request of the inhabitants that we should point out a number of men capable and most acquainted with the laws of this Colony to act as civil magistrates, a list of the same we have enclosed; and for other matters relative to this country, we conceive that Captain Jones and Captain Clark, our delegates, will be able to inform the Honorable the Convention, not doubting but they will listen to an just petitions, and take us under their jurisdiction. <And your petitioners as in duty bound, &c. <Signed by order of the Committee, Harrodsburg, June 20th, 1776 <Jno Gabl. Jones, Chairman <Abraham Hite, Junr. Clerk> 14S11-12

File: 14S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 3:47:46 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24182
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24182


1777-11-25

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Petition of DB and others concerning salt for KY; 11/25/1777; 1: <To the Honorable House of Delegates for the Commonwealth of Virginia. <The petition of the inhabitants of the county of Kentucky humbly sheweth: <That your petitioners are and have for some time past been almost destitute of the necessary article of salt. That by reason of the incursions of the different nations of Indians this year past, we have been prevented from making what quantities would be necessary for ourselves and families as we formerly did, for small parties would be in great danger of being cut off, and larger ones could not be spared from the defence of the families. That as bountiful Nature hath plentifully furnished this country with salt springs where at a small expense salt might be made in abundance, many of which are claimed by persons resident in this State, who have never been at any pains or expense to erect manufactories at them, which if done would be very beneficial to not only adjacent settlers but also interior inhabitants of this Commonwealth. <Now your petitioners humbly pray, that if the claimants do not immediately erect salt manufactories at the different springs claimed by them, that the Honorable House would take it into their consideration, and order that the said springs should be made public property and be manufactured by Government, by which means Government would be profited, and your petitioners have speedy relief. <And your petitioners in duty bound shall ever pray.> 14S13-14

File: 14S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 3:49:28 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24183
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24183


1777-11-25

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Petition of DB and others concerning salt for KY; 11/25/1777; 2: Signed by the following Samuel Campbell James Brown Henry Paulding Azariah Davis David Kerr Bartholomew Fenton James Craig Henry Higgins Benjamin Logan James Dogester James Daugester [sic] Jr. Cornelius Yager Joseph Moore Benjamin Pettit Jonas Manifee Evender Gordon Julius Sanders George Cave James Waters Henry Creamer Patrick Callaghan John Wilkes Wm. Poage John Kennedy George Clark Joseph Kennedy Daniel Boone Johathan Ketcham John Roberts Caleb Callaway Wm. Hancock William Beckley Jno. Bowman Levi Todd Hugh McGary Wm. Bush Richard Gogans Thomas Denton John Denton Evan Hinton Augus Cameron Henry Prather John Holder David Jones William Hays John Martin Samuel Vanpook Samuel Brown William Love John Oliver William Manifee James Duncken David Glen Martin Hammon J. Dardine James Russell John Moore Archibald McCarver George King Jeremiah Brown Samuel Ingram Wilson McKinney William Whitley Samuel Henderson John King Daniel Wilcoxon Bartlit Searcy Oznel Townsin Richard Searcy Reuben Searcy John Preston Benjamin Cutbrarth William Van Cleave Pemberton Rawlings Thomas Brooks William Criddlebough Thos. Luttrell Wm. McGee Benjamin Pelan Richd. Callaway James Forbis William Bryan William Hogan Samuel Bryan Samuel Bryan [sic] Henry Henline Nicholas Mantzar James Callaway Chesley Callaway Samuel Elliot 14S14

File: 14S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 3:50:23 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24184
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24184


1777-11-06

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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11/6/1777: Petition of Richard Spperson formerly of North Carolina, & Catlit Jones of Virginia, that they were employed to go & serve as soldiers in protecting the inhabitants of Kentucky against the Indians -- in which service both were wounded, & rendered incapable of getting a living -- & pray for relief. [not clear whether or not this is quoted] <Certified by me Daniel Boone, Capt.> Endorsed: <Inhabitants of Kentucky, Nov. 6, 1777, refd. to Claims -- reasonable: L10 present relief, & L5 per annum for life allowed R. Spperson, & L20 present, & L10 pr. annum allowed Catlit Jones.> LCD memo: they must have been wounded around Boonesborough.

File: 14S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 3:52:14 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24185
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24185


1778-11-28

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Long Seige. Petition of Nathaniel Henderson concerning the death of his slave [London?]. <To the Honorable the General Assembly of Virginia: <The humble petition of Nathaniel Henderson sheweth: That on or about the eleventh day of September last, in defending Fort Boone in the county of Kentucky against an attempt of the Indians, your petitioner had a valuable negro fellow killed: That the said negro was ordered by the commanding officer to take a gun, and place himself in a dangerous post, & to keep watch and fire on the Indians, which he accordingly did and was killed. That if the said negro had been suffered to remain within his cabin, he could not have been hurt; That the loss of so valuable a slave, together with the many other losses sustained by your petitioner in that country, idstresses him very much. Therefore hopes, that the Assembly will order a recompense, & that the value of the said slave may be paid to your petitioner. <Wmsburg, Nov 21st, 1778 <Nathaniel Henderson> <The deposition of Capt. Wm Buchanan of lawful age, being first sworn on the Holy Evangelists of Almighty God, esposes & says: That in the month of September last, Fort Boone was attacked by a party of Indians to the number of about three hundred & forty, at which time there were not more than sixty men in the Fort, including the garrison soldiers, and all the settlers; that arms & amunition were given to the negro men in said Fort, and stationed by the commanding officer in such a manner so as to make the best defence possible; that a certain negro man, the property of Nathaniel Henderson (who was then absent) had taken post on the outside of the Fort, as dierected by the commander, and in consequence thereof, the said negro fellow was killed by the Indians. The deponent further says, that the said negro was very likely, about twenty four years of age, & in his opinion worth upwards of six hundred pounds. & further saith not. <Wmsburg, Nov. 28th, 1778 <W. Buchanan> Endorsed on reverse: "Rejected." 14S18-19

File: 14S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 3:54:05 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24186
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24186


1779-10-16

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Petition of the Inhabitants of Boone's Fort, 10/16/1779; 1: <To the Honorable House of Assembly for the State of Virginia: <The petition of the distressed inhabitants of Boone's Fort humbly sheweth: That whereas the late act of Assembly has reserved in this county of Kentuckky six hundred & forty acres of land for the use of a town, that is not to be entered or surveyed by any private individual until a time representation of our case is laid before you, the Honorable House of Assembly, the better to enable you the Honorable House of Assembly to be competent juges of the cause we your petitioners are now laying before you, we your petitioners, think it expedient at this time to set forth to your honorable body, the plan & for that the Fort & township was first settled on; & also the methods that have been used by some of those gentlemen that first pretended a claim to this country by a purchase from the Cherokee Indians; & also the names of every person killed & taken belonging to this said Fort since the time of its being first settled, with the dates as near as can be calculated at this time, which we hope will enable you to jugde who has suffered in settling this place. <In the first place after Richard Henderson & company had made purchase from the Indians, they applied to Daniel Boone who was to be their pilot to this country; they further desired to know the most convenient place for a town on the Kentuckky river; said Boone directed them to this place, letting them know the length & bredth of the low grounds as near as he could. Upon his information, it was resolved that this was the spot they would place the town on; and in coming to the place the Company agreed to lay it off into two acre tending lots, which wer to be given up the next year for the use of a town, and town commons, tho' at the same time this should entitle everyman to draw a free lot in town, and also entitle him to his bounty land, as tho' he had made corn on his own entry, as the Proprietor's Proclamation ran thus -- that Every man that made corn in this country in the year 1775 should be entitled to five hundred acres of land. At this time, all of the men who raised corn here the first year, there are now but three at this fort. After the people who had made corn here the first year had gone in to the inhabitants, & times began to grow somewhat difficult, the said Col. Richard Henderson had the fence that was made by the people broke, & took the rails & fenced in betwixt twenty & thirty acres of the most convenient ground next [to] the fort, which has been held under said Henderson ever since, except the value of one or two acres that was taken for gardens, for people in sd. Fort.> 14S20-22 continued

File: 14S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 3:56:04 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24187
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24187


1779-10-16

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Petition of the Inhabitants of Boone's Fort, 10/16/1779; 2: <We your petitioners, think it a grand imposition that sd. Henderson should hold such a quantity of ground, whilst some of us, your petitioners, have been under the necessity of clearing ground at the risk of our lives and tending our crops round sd. Henderson's slaves. <In the second place John Luttrell, one of the gentlemen proprietors, entered on the S.W. side of said township, and improved on the land first allowed by said Proprietors for a town. In the third place, Nathaniel Hart, another of the Said Proprietors, entered the upper half of the town land which was cleared & fenced by the people who tended corn the first year. There may perhaps be one hundred acres within the fence, and the one half of theat cleared -- this sd. Nathaniel Hard finding his entry under said Proprietors would not entitle him to the land, said Hart came out last spring to this cuntry & warmly recommended to the inhabitants of this Fort to lay off a town, which some of the inhabitants agreed to in some measure, they thought it would be well for every man to know his own ground, as the land convenient was held by two or three men. Without the least notice given for an election for Trustees, the drum beat to arms, & these names read over by one of these Trustees, to wit: Richard Callaway, Nathaniel Hart, George Madin, James Estill, & Robert Cartwright, & these questions were asked -- gentlemen, have any of you any objections to these gentlemen being Trustees for this town? To which little or no answer was made -- our silence taken for consent.> 14S22-24 continued

File: 14S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 3:57:05 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24188
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24188


1779-10-16

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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LANDS Petition of the Inhabitants of Boone's Fort, 10/16/1779; 3: <They proceeded to business in the first place they reserved five hundred acres of land for the use of town & town commons, two hundred acres on the south side of the Kentuckky, & three hundred on the north side, which three hundred on the north side is not of the least advantage to this town by reason of a large steep hill that binds all that side of the river opposite to this town, & the hill so steep that it will be with great difficulty to get timber down from any place on that side. What could be the motive of these men to reserve land on that inconvenient side, we are at a loss to know, except some private views incited this sd. Nathaniel Hard in order to obtain the upper half of this town land, which said Hart unjustly claims, as circumstances seem to make it appear. In the first place, it could not be supposed, had we been left to out choice, that we would have chosen men that were entire strangers to us, as three of these men were, and not even settlers in the country, & especially men that were deeply interested as Capt. Hart was. The terms that the lots were let upon, was entirely out of the power of several of them that suffered most for them, & especially widows, who, in justice, ought to have the greatest indulgence; but there was not the least distinction made for they that had been here but two days had the same privilege to draw a lot as they who first settled, so that they complied with the terms which were, that every lot holder should build upon his lot one house, twenty by sixteen, with hewed or sawed logs, with a shingled or clap-board roof, with a brick, stone, or mud chimney, by the first day of Befruary next; & those who did not comply with these terms were to forfeit their lots, which must certainly be the case with several of us, Your petitioners, who have not left so much as one horse even to draw timber.> 14S24-26 continued

File: 14S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 4:08:37 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24189
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24189


1779-10-16

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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LANDS Petition of the Inhabitants of Boone's Fort, 10/16/1779; 4: <Upon information that the late Act of Assembly entitled the inhabitants of this township to six hundred & forty acres of land, we your petitioners assembled ourselves, called upon Col. Richard Callaway, being on the Trustees in the first appointment & desired that a fair election should be held, and that he would still serve as a Trustee, but he utterly refused to serve any other way than by the first appointment, & seemed much disaffected at our proceedings. However, as it is impossible for some of us, your petitioners, to subsiste with our families unless we have some convenient piece of ground allowed us, at this township, we pray that the said six hundred & forty acres of land be established for the use of this said township by the name of Boonesborough, & that you appoint James Estill, Capt. David Gass, Capt. John Holder, John South, Pemberton Rawlings, Stephen Hancock, & John Martin Trustees for the same, being unanimously unamiously chosen for that purpose. <We your petitioners, further pray, that every actual settler at this township may be entitled to draw a free lot, & in the limitation of three years make such improvement as before directed -- the lots to consist of half acre in-lot, & five acre out-lot, as the Indians are so frequently amongst us that we cannot settle any other way than in Forts or townships at this time; & where as, several single men from convincing circumstances have resided with us with no other motive than to give their assistance, that we might not become a prey to our enemies, which was nearly the case with all the assistance we had, in September, 1778, when the Indians laid close siege eleven days to our fort. We, your petitioners, pray that every such single man be entitled to a lot upon the like terms, upon applying to the Trustees for the same. We, your petitioners, pray, that the said six hundred & forty acres of land allowed to the inhabitants of this said township be laid upon the south side of the Kentuckky river, and that the lines may be directed by the late Trustees elected. as the land at this township lies much incommoded by hills, and that we your petitioners may have the privilege of running the land as may be most convenient for the use & benefit of sd. township, as there is not claim prior to the township claim, & we your petitioners, as in duty bound will ever pray.> 14S26-28 continued

File: 14S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 4:09:14 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24190
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24190


1779-10-16

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Petition of the Inhabitants of Boone's Fort, 10/16/1779; 5: Signed by the following: William Hancock John Bullock Joseph Doniphan Joseph Proctor Nathaniel Bullock Reuben Proctor Michael Bedinger Edward Nelson James Berry Jesse Copher Nicholas Proctor John South, Senr. Nicholas Proctor, Jr. Jesse Hedges Samuel Estill John Flewly William Patterson John Callaway Walter Welch Benjm. White Jacob Starns Ambrose Coffey John South Benjamin Dunneway John Harbeston James Soster Flanders Callaway James Briant Edmond Fair Edward Harrod Peter Harper Thos. Noell John Kelly Joshua Perieso 14S28-29 continued

File: 14S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 4:10:04 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24191
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24191


1779-10-16

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Petition of the Inhabitants of Boone's Fort, 10/16/1779; 6: List of the men killed or taken from here: KILLED 3/25/1775 William Twitty & Wm MCWhinney 1776 Wm. Beasley Daniel Goodman Alexr. Neely Joseph Kelley 1777 John Cross Samuel McMullen George Linch Jacob Baughman 1778 Joseph Drake Jacob Johnstone 1779 David Bundan Joshua Barton Frederick Starns Joseph Starns Michael Myers Thomas South Richard Hines John Dumferd John Baugh TAKEN 1775 Samuel Sanders 1776 'Mima Boone Elizabeth Callaway Frances Callaway Majr. Beasley 1777 [LCD:1778] Daniel Boone Bartlet Searcy Nathl. Bullock Jesse Coker [Copher] Wm Hancock James Callaway 'Cajah Callaway Ansel Goodman John Holley John Dunn Wm Staggs Wm Tracey George Hendricks Andrew Johnson Benjm. Kelly Wm Umphreys Daniel Asberry James Robertson Richd. Wade Thos Foot Jas. Mankins John Morton Jonathan Petson Wm Brooks Saml Brooks Joesph Jackson Richd. Searcy 1779 Joab Barton Ambrose White Moses McElwain 14S29-30

File: 14S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 4:10:46 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24192
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24192


1779-10-14

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Petition of the Inhabitants of Boonesborough, 10/14/1779; 1: <To the Honorable House of Assembly for the State of Virginia: <The petition of the distressed inhabitants of the county of Kentucky, humbly sheweth: <That whereas we, your distressed petitioners, sicituate in this remote part, exposed to all the barbarous ravages of inhuman savages, whose savage disposition being animated by the rewards of Governor Hamiliton, has enabled them to hold up a constant war these four years, which term has reduced many of us so low that we have scarce cattle amongst us to supply our small families, and many of us that brought good stocks of both horses & cows, now at this juncture have not left so much as one cow for the support of our families, which to our great disadvantage may plainly appear to every spectator. We have thought proper to present you with a just estimation of our loses in settling and defending this extensive country, which we hope will contribute much to the benefit of the common charge, by virtue of the late Act of Assembly, in opening & establishing a Land Office, tho' at the same time, we, your distressed petitioners, will many of us be entirely deprived of the opportunity of getting so much as one hundred acres of land, notwithstanding the loss of our property, & so many of our lives, hwich we have expended in defense of this country, except we get speedy redress by this our petition: This must be the unhappy event, that we must lie under the disagreeable necessity of going down the Mississippi to the Spanish protection, or becoming tenants to private gentlemen who have men employed at this juncture in this country at one hundred pounds per thousand for running round the lands, which is too rough a medicine ever to be digested by any set of people that have suffered as we have. For the Honorable House of Assembly, in whom rests our most sacred rights & privileges, justice at this time laid by calls your attention. We, your petitioners, hope that the extensive distance of our situation will not create a negligence of this nature, but rather a serious reflection on our inabilities.> 14S31-33 continued

File: 14S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 4:11:52 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24193
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24193


1779-10-14

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Petition of the Inhabitants of Boonesborough, 10/14/1779; 2: <We think it expedient to shew you the reasons why some of us who first settled in the country will be deprived of getting amends for our losses & troubles: First, that many of our inhabitants, both married & single, have been taken by the Indians & carried to Detroit; others killed and their wives & children left in this destitute situation, not being able as yet even to support their indigent families, some of whom never marked or even chose a piece of land in the country. We your petitioners, think four hundred acres too small a compensation, which will be all we have in our power to procure. Secondly, those who have settled since the year 1777, who have suffered equally as much as they that first settled, who could only lose their all, are now deprived of the opportunity of securing any land, except four hundred acres, & that at the State price which is far from many of our capacities to be able to comply with, the terms proposed to us by Act of Assembly, by our being reduced so im coming to the country, & losing what we had after we got to it by the Indians. Thirdly, those who have been in the country before the year 1778, & only raised a small cabin, perhaps never staid three weeks in the country, never lost to the amount of one shilling's worth, yet they are entitled to their choice of one thousand acres at State price. If no alteration be made, it had been well for us if we had all been such cutswater [LCD: ?] & never come to settle in the country until there had been a peace. We have long waited on the opening of a Land Office, hoping each sufferer to receive some compensation in land for his loss, trouble & risk, and we, your petitioners, are still in hopes that when this our petition comes under your consideration, & mature reflection is cast upon the whole, that you will find that our loss is at this juncture to the great advantage of this state. On a reflection of yr. justice & mercy, we congratulate ourselves that a good cause never suffers in the hands of just men -- we cheerfully refer the hole of our grievances, to do, as you, in your wiwsdom, may think right; & we, your petitioners, as in duty bound, shall ever pray.> 14S33-35 continued

File: 14S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 4:12:45 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24194
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24194


1779-10-14

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Petition of the Inhabitants of Boonesborough, 10/14/1779; 3: Signed by: James Estill David Gass John South, Sr. STephen Hancock Pemberton Rawlings Joseph Doniphan John Holder Flanders Callaway James Doster John Kelly Charles Curd Saml. Estill Gr. Michael Bedinger John Bullock Nat. Bullock John Callaway Wm. McGee John South Jesse Conaway John Davis John Harriston Margaret Drake Catherine Boffman Edward Nelson Charles Lockart Reuben Searcy Moses Nelson William Cradlebaugh David McGee Benjamin Dunaway Elizabeth Horn Daniel Wilcockson Edward Nelson Joshua Peniso Jacob Starns Jesse Hodges John martin Ambrose Coffee Nicholas Proctor Michael Stoner Thos. Noell Jesse Coker Edward Harrod James Berry James Briant Peter Hackett William Peterson Reuben Proctor William Hancock Samuel South Charles Gatliff Edmund Farr Walter Welch John Kelly Nicholas Proctor, Jr. John South Jr. 14S35-36

File: 14S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 4:14:32 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24195
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24195


1781-12-14

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Petition of DB and others for better government in KY, read 12/14/1781: claim that they <are situated so remotely from the seat of Government, and so entirely detached from the other inhabited parts of the State, that very few of the benefits of Government can be extended to them under the present plan of administering the same. That they settled in those counties under the encauragements held out by the Convention or General Assembly, purchased their lands of the State, consider themselves as equally entitled with other citizens to the attention of your Honble House, and wish to remain under the same Government, being sensible of the advantages which will result to the State in general by continuing the connection. They, therefore, humbly pray, that your Honble. House will take their case into consideration, and make such regulations for their relief, as shall be thought just & reasonable.> SIGNED John Crittenden, George Slaughter, Jno. Rogers, John May, Thos. Swearingen, Daniel Boone, Willis Green. These men [representatives?] ordered to bring in a bill for better administration in the Western country; brought in and passed 5/1782. 14S47-48

File: 14S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 4:18:48 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24196
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24196


1782

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Petition of DB and others for better government in KY; 6/1/1782. Included also John Holder "and a large number of others of KY." Presented to the VA Legislature. <Va. neglecting their former prayer for better Government, wd. seem as if they were abandoned: Plead for better Govt. they wish to be under Virginia, until "your Honorable House make a request to Congress for a new State, & we are recd. into the Union.> LCD memo: <While Boone was pleading for good wholesome govt. other potions of Ky were more intent on self, & were petitioning for lands & land rights.> 14S49

File: 14S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 4:19:28 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24197
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24197


1776

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Harrodsburg Memorial 6/15/1776; 1: <To the Honorable the Converntion of Virginia <The humble petition of the inhabitants of Kentucke (or Louisa) River, on the western parts of Fincastle county. <Humbly sheweth that many of your petitioners became adventurers in this part of the Colony in the year 1774, in order to provide a subsistance for themselves and their posterity, but were soon obliged by our savage enemy to abandon this enterprize. And in the year following, after the country had been discovered and explored, many more became adventurers, some of wheom claimed lands by vitrue of warrants granted by Lord Dunmore, agreeable to the Royal Proclamation in the year 1763, and others by pre-occupancy, agreeably to the entry laws of Virginia. And in the mean time a company of men from North Carolina purchases, or pretended to purchase, from the Cherokee Indians, all that tract of land from the southern most waters of Cumberland River to the banks of Louisa or Kentucke river, including also the lands on which inhabitants live in Powell's Valley. By virtue of which purchase they stile themselves the true and absolute proprietors of the New Indapendent Province (as they call Transylvania) they are endeavoring to erect, and in consequence of their usurped authority, officers both civil and military are appointed, writs of election issued, Assemblies convened, a land office opened, conveyances made, lands sold at an exhorbitant price, and a system of policy introduced which does not at all harmonize with that lately adopted by the United Colonies; but on the contrary, for ought yet appears, this fertile country will afford a safe assylum to those whose principles are inimical to American Freedom. But your petitioners have the greatest reason to question the validity of those men's purchase, being well informed that the Chreokees never extended their claims north of Cumberland River, nor would warrant any lands on the other side. Besides, it is now well known, that the Indians of the Six Nations claimed & ceded those very lands to the Crown of Great Britian at a treaty held at Fort Stanwix in November, 1768.> 14S2-4 continued

File: 14S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 4:21:40 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24177
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24177


1786

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Richard Butler and Samuel H. Parsons to the President of Congress, Mouth of Great Miami, 2/1/1786: Sending the text of the Treaty of Great Miami, and their impressions of the state of the western country. <From the local situation of the Shawanoes, and the ascendincy they have over the other Indian nations, we are of opinion their friendship is of more importance to the weal of the citizens of the United States than that of any other tribe of Indians in the Western Teritory.> <We have reason to believe that too great a number of our own citizens on the frontier of our country are as little disposed to peace with the Indians as our neighbours [the British] are anxiously endeavoring to prevent it. . . . We think it is our duty to inform you your Excellency, that the inhabitants of the District of Kentucky have given us great trouble, and occasioned much public expense. It hath been with difficulty we have restrained them from violence on the persons of the Indians whilst attending the Treaty. In sundry instances, they have plundered them of their horses, and in the setttlements publickly avow the propriety of their conduct with impunity. Some few horses have been returned by the vigilance of Col. Boone, but so great was the opposition to his measures amongst the people that he was obliged to desist from further pursuit, & us to put up with the loss thereof, not thinking ourselves warranted to use force to obtain our property in a country the inhabitants say the laws are sufficient to protect the rights of the citizens & friends of the U.S., but unfortunately the honest and industrious part of the people of that country are at present too few to retrain the licentiousness of their neighbours. The people who had intruded & settled on the lands of the United States on the North West side of the Ohio river have been removed according to the orders of Congress; many of them have again returned; others are daily going over & rebuilding their houses & clearing the fields for spring crops.> 15S4,7-8

File: 15S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 6:52:02 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24234
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24234


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Col. William Preston, 1/31/1775: wrote about this <large purchase by on Col. Henderson of North Carolina from the Cherokees. I hear that Henderson tolks with great freedom & indecency of the Govr. of Va., sets the government at defiance & says if he once had five hundred good fellows settled in that country he would not value Virginia; that the officers & soldiers who have lands surveyed there must hold under him. . . . There are now at Wataga eighty Indians, & upwards of seven hundred more are to attend the treaty.> 15S100

File: 15S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 6:55:25 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24235
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24235


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Col. William Preston to ?, 4/9/1775: <Henderson, I hear, has made the purchase & got a conveyance of the great and valuable country below the Kentucky from the Cherokees. He & abt 300 adventurers are gone out to take possession, who, it is said, intend to set up an independent government & form a code of laws for themselves. How this may be, I can't say; but I am afraid the steps taken by the Government have been too late. Before the purchase was made, had the Governor interfered, it is believed the Indians would not have sold. About twelve or thirteen hundred of them met at the Treaty, & I hear near one half of them went off much displeased, as they shared no part of the goods given by the Company.> 15S99-100

File: 15S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 6:56:59 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24236
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24236


1863

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Mrs. Eliza C. Thornton, youngest surviving child of Simon Kenton, White county IN, 7/15/1863: 1775 in KY Kenton discovered the track of a man; for several days each pursued the other's tracks -- finally both were "treed." Intently watched each other; relating this to his daughter, Kenton said he finally thought to himself, "it could be only death any how," and called out voceriferously "Who are you?" "White man -- friend," the other replied. She thinks it was DB; they warmly embraced each other, so glad to find the other a friend, not an enemy. 17S94

File: 17S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 6:59:56 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24237
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24237


1863

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with William Grant, son of John Grant, a nephew of DB's, Cass county IN, 7/23/1863: He saw DB several times in 1798 around the mouth of the Little Sandy, carrying his gun and hunting buffalo. He wore a white hunting shirt, fringed; it was warm weather. Fair skinned, quiet disposition; did not talk much, but he was very pleasant. This the year before he removed to MO. Says DB <got displeased about his Kentucky land losses, & went to Missouri, & got a Spanish grant.> Says DB once was the guard of a man who had stolen money at the mouth of Little Sandy; informant's grandfather, Davis Ruth, and DB consulted on what to do with the man. Finally they gave him a choice: to be taken before a Justice court and tried, or to be whipped at once and set free. The man gave up the stolen money and chose the whipping. Mr Ruth was too old (84 years) to administer the punishment, so it fell to DB; he did not whip him much before letting him go. DB was a good surgeon for gun-shot wounds. 17S120

File: 17S1.DR1



    Created: 6/14/2017 7:01:34 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24238
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24238


1840

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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LCD memo of ca 1840: Some two or three brother of the name of Bryant [sic] were Tory leaders up the Yadkin. They joined the Scotch camp and were in McLeod's defeat. One of them fled some 40 miles to the ferry over Cape Fear river near the present town of Fayetteville; the ferryman refused to take him over, and Bryant [sic] fell upon him, and both pitched into the river, waist-deep, and the ferryman, though the smaller of the two, held Bryant [sic] under the water, and drowned him. The other one or two pretty much kept themselves safe under British protection. In the autumn of 1779 they led 500 Tories from the Yadkin to join the British; were pursued by Col. John Preslay [?] with 300 men, drove them to the garrison above the Cheran [?] Hills. 28S141-42

File: 28S1.DR1



    Created: 6/15/2017 11:11:41 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24249
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24249


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Henry Rutherford, Lauderdale county TN, ca. 1843-44: Col. Samuel Bryan and his six brothers of the Bryan settlement, 25 miles above Salisbury on the Yadkin, were noted Tories. One was drowned. Samuel was taken prisoner and confined in Salisbury jail for a long time and finally tried; was pretty wealthy. Thomas Bryan did much mischief during the war. 29S71

File: 29S1.DR1



    Created: 6/15/2017 11:16:17 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24251
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24251


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Henry Rutherford, Lauderdale county TN, ca. 1843-44: Joe Robertson, an old weaver, used to say that he had been on hunting trips with Daniel Boone to French Lick; there were a few French hunters there. Was also a salt manufacture there. 29S72

File: 29S1.DR1



    Created: 6/15/2017 11:18:30 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24252
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24252


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Mr. [?] Gossett of Tippah county MS, ca. 1841-43: Informant visited DB in 9/1816; he was lively in conversation and full of anecdotes. His hair was white, his face ruddy, a medium sized man. Because of the warm weather, DB had laid aside his hunting shirt. He told of a hunting trip through the MO country prior to his settling there, in company with a young hunter. They separated, and the young man came across a Yehoo [not in OED], shot and wounded it, and was in turn attacked and killed by the enraged wounded animal. DB, hearing the report, came up, leveled his gun and dispatched the dangerous animal. It had six toes on each foot, was eight feet high; walked erect. DB regretted not being able to take long hunts any longer; looked forward to one more hunting expedition the next fall, but his friends and kin were opposed to his going. He spoke affectionately of <his dear old Kentucky; Kentucky was the best, & Missouri the second best country he had ever seen.> In 9/1815 DB had gone up the Gasconade 500 miles on a trapping expedition. His son Nathan and his daughter Jemima, as well as his grandchildren had prevailed upon his not to go, but to no purpose. He was accompanied by some 8-10 neighbors. He carefully greased and fixed his dozen traps. 31S325

File: 31S1.DR1



    Created: 6/15/2017 12:02:19 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24268
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24268


1844-11

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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LCD memo from 11/1844: DB's MO graveyard is overgrown with a thicket of briars several feet high and almost impenetrable. There is a rough unlettered stone at Boone's grave. 31S384

File: 31S1.DR1



    Created: 6/15/2017 12:03:23 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24269
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24269


1868-10-10

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Noble Callaway, son of Micajah Callaway; Salem IN, 10/10/1868: 'Cage Callaway blamed Boone some for his captivity. The men had constructed a cabin at the Blue Licks and some of them thought they could have defended themselves there. Father was a prisoner for five years and five months. Was taken to the Falls of the Ohio to be exchanged, but there was no Indian to exchange for him. He had promised the Indians to return with them; the whites at the Falls asked if he wanted to return; "No!" he told them, so they helped him to escape. He was 6'2" and weighed over 200 pounds. Brother of Flanders Callaway. Cage was only 17 when captured. 25S125

File: 25S1.DR1



    Created: 6/15/2017 12:39:25 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24277
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24277


1868-10-10

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Noble Callaway, son of Micajah Callaway; Salem IN, 10/10/1868: His father, who was a captive in Chillicothe, said the Shawnees returned from unsuccessfully pursuing Boone saying that he was lost, running in circles. 25S126

File: 25S1.DR1



    Created: 6/15/2017 12:41:26 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24278
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24278


1868-11-10

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with John Hawkins Callaway, son of Micajah Callaway; Salem IN, 11/10/1868: Some of the men wanted to fight, but his father said it probably would have been rash. He didn't blame Boone. They had a hard time getting to the Shawnee towns. 14 days travel. Snow 2 or 3 feet deep. Very little food. Indians divided what they had, but everyone suffered. <Callaway said that if the men had but had their guns three days after their surrender, they would have fought with desperation to regain their liberty.> On reaching the towns the Indians had a great time; divided the prisoners among the towns. At night the Indians would drive a bent stick like a half hoop into the ground, fastening down each prisoners ankles as if they were in stocks. His feet got badly frozen and in his old age he always wore moccisins to "favor his feet." Callaway was once taken on an Indian war party; attacked Martin's and Ruddell's forts. Was compelled to witness the burning of several prisoners; Indians would take a whole day torturing some poor fellow to death, keep him circling around his stake, occasionally applying their torches to his body. They told Callaway if he should attempt to run away, such would be his fate. Taken as an interpreter to the Falls of the Ohio, not indended as an exchange; when he indicated to the Shawnee that he wanted to remain with the whites, they tried to induce him to remain with them, offering him horses and even a tract of land. 25S127-130

File: 25S1.DR1



    Created: 6/15/2017 12:42:49 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24279
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24279


1778

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
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None.
Gov. Patrick Henry to Col. William Christian, Williamsburg VA, 3/15/1778: <I don't believe all of Boone's party are lost.> LCD: infers from this that Col. Christian had written Henry that Boone and his party had been killed. 25S222

File: 25S1.DR1



    Created: 6/15/2017 12:48:46 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24280
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24280


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with James Callaway, son of Micajah Callaway; Jackson county IN, ca 1868: Says his father said <they were treated so badly that they regretted they had not fought & resisted till they died.> But doesn't remember his father blaming Boone for surrendering. 25S258-59

File: 25S1.DR1



    Created: 6/15/2017 12:50:08 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24281
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24281


1844

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with John Touner, an early KY settler; east TN, 8/1844: In 7/1779 he accompanied DB & his family, along with a few other "adventurers" to KY, passing through Moccasin Gap, Wallen's Creek to Cumberland Gap, then the old trail to Boonesborough. <Both Boone & his wife said on that trip, that the very day she reached her friends of Yadkin, Boone reached Boonesboro from his captivity -- July, 1778. Boone now settled his new station.> 32S237

File: 32S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 4:00:44 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24305
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24305


1844

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
People
None.
Interview with Col. William Martin; [TN], 9/12/1844: <It was of a Sunday evening that the two MIss Callaways & Miss Boone went over in the canoe to the opposite shore of the Kentucky after flowers or grapes. The Indians were overtaken the second night -- bits of the clothes of the girls occasionally found; when the Indians after a while discovered this they threatened the girls, if they should do so again, they would kill them; the Indians treated them kindly. The second day of the pursuit, at night, the Indians pursued down a large branch, & suddenly the trail changed its course up a small tributary branch; Boone said he was fully persuaded from the sudden change in the course of the rout, that the Indians had gone up to camp. Moved on cautiiously a short distance & discovered the camp, concluded to approach it as near as they could, & not fire until within shooting distance -- one of the company imprudently fired too soon -- on which the girls made with all speed towards their deliverers, as they knew full well they were such -- the others fired, the Indians broke & run, leaving evidence of one being wounded. Thinks 8 was the number of the pursuers -- Boone -- Col. Callaway & Col. Holder, among them. Flanders Callaway was with the party that went to head the Indians -- or intercept them on the way to the Blue Licks -- No recollection about night pursuit with torches. These facts Col. Martin learned from Flanders Callaway & Richd. Callaway of Franklin Co: Tenn.> 32S273

File: 32S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 4:03:20 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24306
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24306


1844

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Col. George Smith, Sumner county TN, 1844: He heard the following story from Col. Mansco: About 1771 <Mansco and some hunting companions, near the junction of Big Bone [?] and Green rivers, heard a singular noise at some distance; Mansco crept carefully towards it, while the others remained behind; & he found a man lying upon a deer skin spread on the ground, flat upon his back, & singing at the top of his voice! It was Daniel Boone. Boone, at another time was alone, in winter, & a snowy time -- lay himself down & covered his blanket over him -- a party of Indians discovered the solitary hunter, raised the snow-covered blanket, & one of the Indians exclaimed "Ah! wide mouth, have I got you now?" -- He was taken prisoner, but escaped in a few days: This according to Col. Mansco, occured near where Jonesboro, Tenn. now is. Gen Danl. Smith [George Smith's father] represented Boone as a very happy tempered man.> 32S481

File: 32S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 4:07:15 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24307
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24307


1860

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Capt. Peter Lee, Ohio, 1860: DB settled at Limestone in the fall of 1786 and lived in a cabin directly on the bank below the mouth of the creek. Was a very kind and hospitable man. In 1787 [sic] he left and moved to Kenhawa. 9S225

File: 9S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 4:40:33 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24319
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24319


1858

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Mrs. Annah Boone Nicholson, daughter of Jacob Boone of Maysville, Maysville KY, 8/18/1858: Sometime prior to 1785 DB visited his old PA home and induced Jacob, Ovid, and Thomas Boone to settle in KY to better his condition. They sold their possessions and wagoned to the Ohio, from where they descended to DB's residence in Limestone, arriving 5/11/1786. 7S33-34

File: 7S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 4:43:57 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24320
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24320


1858

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Mrs. Annah Boone Nicholson, daughter of Jacob Boone of Maysville, Maysville KY, 8/18/1858: She remembers the treaty concluding this campaign at Limestone (she was 4 years old). Was an exchange of prisoners. Mrs. Sharp, who had been a captive of some two years, was one. Indians signaled across the river, and DB with Mr. Sharp and others went over. They found Mrs. Sharp, <mounted a-straddle, with nothing on her head, & dressed in leggings & petticoat stroud. She seemed broken in spirits, & paid but little attention to the whites; though recognized her husband, who was deeply moved: She was taken to Jacob Boone's, got soap & went to the river, above the creek, among the willows, out of sight, & washing herself, & put on clean clothes brought by her husband who also brought clothing for his little girl; but for wome earson unknown to Mrs. Nicholson, the little girl was not brought it.> About 75 Indians camped near the Boones; had a dance near DB's warehouse which was built of old boat gunwales and planks. DB gave them a cow, which they shot down and cut up in pieces, each one skinning his own piece. Blue Jacket there; he pledged to DB not to take any of the Limestone people prisoner; and later when a Samuel Blackburn, from nearby, was captured, Blue Jacket made sure he was released. 7S35-38

File: 7S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 4:46:25 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24321
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24321


1858

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
People
None.
Interview with Mrs. Annah Boone Nicholson, daughter of Jacob Boone of Maysville, Maysville KY, 8/18/1858: Very sure that DB never revisited KY, at least never came to Maysville. 7S44

File: 7S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 4:47:16 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24322
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24322


1858

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Mrs. Annah Boone Nicholson, daughter of Jacob Boone of Maysville, Maysville KY, 8/18/1858: <Such was the result of the war spirit which pervaded all classes at that day> in the 1790s that a school master at Limestone named Ross, whenever a scholar played truant, would deputize a squardron of boys, armed them with paw-paw bushes, and sent them out military fashion to bring in the deliquent. 7S44

File: 7S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 4:49:11 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24323
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24323


1858

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Mrs. Sabina Ellis, daughter of William Brooks, ca. 8/1858: Her father was one of the captives. When DB appeared at the Salt Lick, he said: <Don't fire, boys, these are friendly Indians.> All laid their arms aside but Brooks, who held his until he saw he was all alone in retaining his weapon. It was an hour before the men fully understood that they were prisoners of war. The Indians heavily packed the prisoners. Brooks refused to take such a large load until DB persuaded him that he would otherwise be killed, then divided the load with him to make it lighter. Food very scarce on the march; Indians gave what they had to the prisoners; then several days without any; Indians finally killed a deer, cut it up, and roasted all, even the "paunch." He was made to run the gauntlet. He knocked down two or three Indians at the outset by zigzagging, and thus only got two light blows. The young Indians wanted to "rim and bore his ears, & he fought & foiled them." An old Indian came and adopted him into his family in place of his deceased son, admiring his bravery. Young Indians were taking prisoners into the water, and making sport by dunking them till almost drowned; Brooks was a strong swimmer, and went in; they attempted to duck him and Brooks got them under him and held them down; several more came to the rescue, and he treated them the same way. After that they were glad to leave him alone. They called him "The Big Sturgeon." Was three years with the Indians and two more with the British. Indians gave him considerable freedom, but finally sold him at Detroit. Was put in irons in Montreal and cruelly treated, much worse by the British than by the Indians. Finally officers who discovered he was a Mason like them let him go. Finally he was exchanged and made his way back to Boonesborough. Never blamed DB for surrendering; agreed with his strategy. 7S45-52

File: 7S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 4:52:27 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24324
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24324


1858

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
People
None.
Interview with Mrs. Jane Rains, Maysville, ca. 8/1858: Her brother Alexander Edwards shot himself in the leg at the rendezvous; DB offered to extract the bullet, but her brother was too scared. He died in four or five days. At the Limestone treaty many of the white captives, especially the children, wept to be separated from their Indian families. DB gave the Indians several beeves during the treaty council. 7S52-57

File: 7S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 4:54:42 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24325
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24325


1858

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Andrew Wood, Mt. Olivet KY, 8/22/1858: At the Limestone DB so pleased the Indians with his generosity, that they promised not to ever let any Limestone people be hurt; and actually kept their promise in at least one instance. 7S114

File: 7S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 4:55:37 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24326
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24326


1863

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with DeMoville Talbott, grandson of Wm Kenton Sr., Ohio, 8/15/1863: Relates a tradition that Clark's men rushed on the Indians so regardless of danger that they Indians said they acted like mad men, and thus the river got its name: Mad River. 18S71

File: 18S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 4:58:19 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24327
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24327


1863

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Mrs. Rachel Stiles Kibby, moved with husband to St. Charles MO from CT via Ohio in 1802, 8/22/1863: Saw DB for a time in St. Charles, he there 2-3 months being treated for a very bad case of scrofula; boarded while there; treated by Dr. Wilson, an eastern MD who said the disease originated from having eaten meat so much without bread. Disease kept him from hunting; was discontented and unhappy if he missed any hunting season. Had some negroes to work his farm. 18S93

File: 18S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 5:01:13 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24328
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24328


1863

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Peter Smith, an early KY settler, Bourbon county KY, 8/27/1863: Saw DB in Fayette county KY in 1793 when he stayed all night with the family [Peter was 10 years old]; dressed in hunting shirt and moccasins. Described DB as <a sort of pony-built man." 18S113

File: 18S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 5:06:55 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24329
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24329


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Mrs. Ann Lewis Harper, daughter of William and Easter Whitley, a KY pioneer at Boonesborough, Midway KY, Says her mother met DB when he was about to remove to MO and asked him: "Col. Boone, are you never going to settle down and quit moving?" He said while he could fall trees for firewood into his yard, he would be contended to remain -- when he could no longer do so, he must remove where he could. 18S196

File: 18S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 5:08:38 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24330
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24330


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with William Nelson, whose grandfather Edward Nelson was a Boonesborough pioneer, Boonesboro KY, 9/8-9/1863: Long Seige His grandfather told him that William Cradlebaugh threw buffalo bones over the pickets at the Indians digging the mine. They cussed at him and said the people in the fort must be running out of amunition if they had to throw bones. 18S231

File: 18S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 5:10:50 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24331
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24331


1863

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with William Nelson, whose grandfather Edward Nelson was a Boonesborough pioneer, Boonesboro KY, 9/8-9/1863: Says his grandfather was out hunting across the river from the fort during the winter of 1778 with a young man named James Waters who had just come from the settlements. The young man made some boasts about wanting to meet and fight the Indians. Nelson answered that there were plenty around, and he might get his wish sooner than he would like. Just then shots ran out and Waters was hit; he was so terrified that he ran for the fort, and reaching the river, jumped into the icy current, but drowned before reaching the other shore. 18S233

File: 18S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 5:12:26 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24332
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24332


1863

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with William Nelson, whose grandfather Edward Nelson was a Boonesborough pioneer, Boonesboro KY, 9/8-9/1863: Grandfather told him that about the winter of 1778 a French trader came up the Kentucky river and stopped at Boonesborough; he <drove a good trade with the inhabitants. This visit was quite an era in the history of the fort.> 18S233

File: 18S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 5:14:38 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24333
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24333


1863

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with William Nelson, whose grandfather Edward Nelson was a Boonesborough pioneer, Boonesboro KY, 9/8-9/1863: Grandfather told him that <when the first corn raised at Boonesboro was fit for roasting, THAT was a great time of rejoicing.> 18S233

File: 18S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 5:15:36 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24334
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24334


1863

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Guffey Peyton, son of Yelventon Peyton who came to Boonesborough in 1775, Madison county KY, 9/10/1863 Bowman Campaign of '79: His father along; was among the men trapped in the Indian cabin, being fired on by the Shawnees from the council-house. Was next to a "little Dutchman" who kept peeping through the port-holes; Peyton warned him that he would be shot, but the German kept it up: <Finally received a shot which spattered his brains.> They had gotten up close under the cover of a dense fog, but when the sun came up, the fog disappeared. They retreated: he <got a puncheon, held it on behind him with one hand, & his rifle in the other -- & scampered off, & several balls hit the puncheon, but he escaped & rejoined the others.> Afterwards some called him Puncheon Peyton. 18S242,256

File: 18S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 5:19:53 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24335
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24335


1863

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Lewis Bryan, oldest son of Daniel Bryan, Lexington KY, 9/13/1863: Saw DB in MO in 1808, 1809, & 1810. Conveyed the letter to Judge Coburn in 1809 that is in Collins' KENTUCKY. DB wrote and sent it from his home on Femme Osage. DB did not hunt during 1809 because his eyesight was ailing. 18S278

File: 18S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 5:21:30 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24336
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24336


1863

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Lewis Bryan, oldest son of Daniel Bryan, Lexington KY, 9/13/1863: When DB was left alone in KY <for the sake of the pleasure of hearing a human voice, Daniel Boone would frequently talk aloud, so as to enjoy the echo. 18S279-80

File: 18S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 5:22:45 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24337
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24337


1863

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with George Edwards, his father came to Limestone in 1786, Brown county OH, 9/21/1863: Limestone treaty, 1787: From his father: Frenchman and his squaw were among the prisoners Logan had taken in 1786; they were sent to the Shawnee towns to arrange for an exchange of prisoners. Quite a large number of Shawnees gathered across the river where Aberdeen is now. Had war dances: the Indians <hideously painted in their grandest war style, with an Indian beating music with a stick on a pair of old saddle-bags.> Reported "an affecting scene:" a very pretty white woman, who had been taken in KY on the Wilderness Road, and had since been married to a Shawnee warrior; her father came for her; the couple parted with affectionate embraces and great weeping. They had no children. One man recognized a mare that had been stolen from Kenton's Station; Capt. Calvin declared he would retrieve that horse if he had to scalp every Indian there. <Boone and Kenton saw trouble brewing, and bought the mare of its Indian claimant for a keg of whiskey, returned her to the needy widow, & thus allayed the rising storm.> 19S82-83

File: 19S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 5:45:52 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24345
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24345


1863

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with George Edwards, his father came to Limestone in 1786, Brown county OH, 9/21/1863: <Boone was quiet, of few words and to the point.> 19S83

File: 19S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 5:47:24 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24346
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24346


1863

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Francis Preston, his father moved to Limestone in 1787, North Fork KY, 9/27/1863: Visited DB in MO shortly before his death. Mentioned having met Simon Kenton at the Blue Licks in 1775; each strongly suspected the other -- DB thought he'd found a British spy from Detroit [in 1775?], Kenton feared DB might know something of the murder he thought he'd committed back home. They did not remain long together. 19S137

File: 19S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 5:49:14 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24347
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24347


1863

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Mrs. Elizabeth Scott, daughter of Thomas Brooks of Limestone, Highland county OH, 9/30/1863: Her father saw DB moving to MO; he and his family were camped in the woods, a little above Aberdeen; DB and party came in on pack-horses; tin cups and cooking utensils tied up; they stayed one night in the family camp. 19S164

File: 19S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 5:50:35 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24348
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24348


1863

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Mrs. Elizabeth Scott, daughter of Thomas Brooks of Limestone, Highland county OH, 9/30/1863: Remembers her uncle William Brooks saying that <he would carry the marks of his manacles when a prisoner with the British to his grave.> Was very sick in prison; he was refused water by the woman nurse. <He cried for it, & he resolved he would have some at any risk as he felt that he shd. die for want of it: Watching the nurse, he saw bring in some water for the night, & where she put it -- in the night, as soon as she was asleep, he rolled out of his berth, & crept along as well as he could to the water, & indulged himself to his heart's content. The next morning he began to get better, & soon recovered.> 19S165

File: 19S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 5:54:13 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24349
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24349


1863-10-01

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Col. Thomas Rogers, father moved to KY in 1785, Greenfield OH, 10/1/1863: When a boy of 12, in 1797, went on a hunting trip with his father William Rogers. Met DB, Nathan Boone, and a son-in-law (thinks by the name of Henderson [?]) at May's Lick. They were on foot with their guns. DB was dressed in a linen hunting shirt, the color of leaves, and moccasins. They had been over the country, high up the Sandy, and had met with very little success -- it had been a very dry fall; were now returning down the Ohio and landed at Maysville. Complained of the poor hunting. DB talked about the time he had killed abundant buffalo and bear, had plenty of meat and skins, high up the Sandy; made a boat out of a couple of long hickory poles shaped in a hoop, to which he fastened buffalo hide, making it "bag down like the half of an egg, then ribbed it with poles like a basket," had to manage carefully, but got his plunder down river. <Col. Boone was quite cheerful, talkative, & anecdotal. Went with him to his cabin, a one story small cabin, small clearing, perhaps 8 or 9 acres. He said he wd. have to move soon, so he cd fall trees for wood into his yard. Deliberate in speech, contemplative.> 19S168-69

File: 19S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 5:56:43 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24350
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24350


1863-10-02

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Edward Bryan, came with his parents to KY in 1788 when 6, Highland county OH, 10/2/1863: Knew DB when he lived awhile on the north branch of McBride's Run, west side of Hinkson. Lived in log cabin, had a small improvement. Had a bad case of rhematism; on certain occasions he was unable to carry his own gun, and his wife went with him on hunts for that purpose. Sometimes he could not life his foot without difficulty. Even then he could kill more deer than his neighbors, he knew their haunts and habits so well. 19S170

File: 19S1.DR1



    Created: 6/21/2017 5:58:33 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24351
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24351


1812

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Resolutions of the KY Legislature in behalf of DB: <The committee to whom was referred the memorial of Daniel Boone, beg leave to recommend the following resolutions to be adopted. <The Legislature of Kentucky, taking into view the many eminent services rendered by Col. Daniel Boone, in exploring and settling the Western Country, frm which great advantages have resulted, not only to this State, but to his country in general, and that from circumstances over which he had not control, he is now reduced to poverty, not having so far as appears an acre of land, out of the vast territory he has been a great instrument in peopling. <Believing also, that it is unjust as it is impolitic, that useful enterprise, and eminent services should go unrewarded by a Government wherein merit confers the only distinction -- And having sufficient reason to believe, that a grant of ten thousand acres of land which he claims in Upper Louisiana, would have been confirmed to him by the Spanish Government, had not the said Territory passed by cession into the hands of the General Government: Wherefore, <Resolved By the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky -- That our Senators and Representatives in Congress, be requested to make use of their exertions to procure a grant of land in said Teritory, to said Boone; either the said ten thousand acres to which he appears to have an equitable claim from the grounds set forth to this Legislature by way of confirmation, or to such other quantity, and in such place as shall be deemed most advisable by way of donation. <2. Resolved -- That copies of these resolutions be transmitted by the Governor, to our Senators and Representatives in Congress, together with copies of the memorial of said Boone to this Legislature, for their further information. <John Simpson, Speaker of the House of Representaives. <Gabriel Slaughter, Speaker of the Senate. <Approved, February 8th, 1812. <Charles Scott, Governor.> 16S149-150

File: 16S1.DR1



    Created: 6/27/2017 9:42:06 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24472
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24472


1813

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Report of the Congressional Select Committee to whom was referred the petition of DB; 1/29/1813; 1: This report made by Mr. Hempstead from the select committee: <That this petition was first presented to this House on the 8th day of January 1810, and referred to a select committee, and a report made thereon on the 1st of Febuary, 1810: that said report has never been finally acted upon by this House, and as it contains a statement of facts, which, as far as they go, this committee find correct, they have made the same a part of this report: -- "That (if not antecedent) about the commencement of the Revolutionary struggle, the petitioner Daniel Boone, of an enterprising spirit, and having a desire of the most ardent kind for exploring that part of the United States called the wilderness of the West, after passing several hundred miles over immense mountains, and through gloomy forests, over a country entirely uninhabited, and where the footsteps of civilized man were entirely unknown, discovered, and with a few daring and enterprising companions, established with a hardihood incalculably perilous, a settlement of civilized population among the savage haunts of that extensive wilderness, the (now) populous State of Kentucky; that in defending and maintaining the new world, to which his enterprising genius had led him, incalculable difficulties had to be encountered, and against a cruel, daring, relentless, and insidious enemy, aided by the British and Canadian French, from Upper Canada, he experienced all the vicissitudes of savage warfare, until the peace of 1783, and during that long and bloody contest, several of his family fell victims fo Savage barbarity. <It appears that the petitioner was actually engaged during the whole of the Revolutionary contest, against the enemies of the United States, although not officially canned on by the Government of his country, and that he contributed in an eminent degree, by exploring, planting a settlement, and by his unremitted exertions in defending that infant country from savage cruelties, to the early march of western population, which has been so particularly beneficial to the United States.> 16S150-152 continued

File: 16S1.DR1



    Created: 6/27/2017 9:43:49 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24473
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24473


1813

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Report of the Congressional Select Committee to whom was referred the petition of DB; 1/29/1813; 2: <"That the petitioner is old, and from the hardships necessarily encountered in the arduous undertaking, has become infirm; that agriculture is his only dependence to procure sustenance for himself and family, from adverse fortune; and the Commissioners of land claims, having refused to confirm the claim of the petitioner to a small portion of land, to which he had thought he had secured a title, under the Spanish Government, in consequence of his having failed to comply with some of the legal requisites not within his contemplation, although he was an actual resident, within the country, all the time contemplated by the law of Congress, he does not possess one acre of extensive country which was by him so ably defended, after having exhausted his constitution and health, in its discovery, promoting its settlement and protection. The petitioner disclaims all pretentions of any legal claim on his country, but throws himself upon its grateful benevolence, and requests that a portion of land might be granted him by Congress, in the Teritory of Missouri, as a resting place, after his numberless toils and perils." <The committee in addition to the foregoing circumstances, have also considered the memorial of the said Daniel Boone to the Legislature of the State of Kentucky, with the resolution thereon, to them referred. If any doubts were before entertained of the numerous misfortunes with which the petitioner has been afflicted, the sanction given to the Memorial, by the Legislature of the State in which most of the circumstances transpired, most unquestionably obviates them, and in the opinion of the committee, go far in recommending to the consideration of the House, the case of an aged, infirm, and worn-out man, whose best days have been usefully devoted to the settlement and prosperity of the Western Country; and whose only remaining earthly hope is, that the benevolent interposition of the national Legislature in his behalf, may, in his extreme old age, gladden his drooping heart, and raise him from poverty and distress.> 16S152-154 continued

File: 16S1.DR1



    Created: 6/27/2017 9:45:08 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24474
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24474


1813

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Report of the Congressional Select Committee to whom was referred the petition of DB; 1/29/1813; 3: <The committee after examining the whole circumstances, the merit and situation of the said petitioner, beg leave to recommend the following resolution: <Resolved, That the prayer of the petitioner is reasonable and ought to be granted. <Endorsed: "REsolution of the Leg. of Ky respecting a petition of Danl. Boone, &c. 4th March, 1812, referred to comtee. on Public Lands. Jan. 19th 1813, refd. to Mr. Hempstead, Mr. Grundy, & Mr. Johnson. 29th Jan. 1813, report made, & committed to comtee. of the whole. FEb 4th 1813, comtee. of the whole discharged & refd. to the comtee. on the Pulic Lands.> 16S154-155 MEMORIALS Petition of the Heirs of DB to Congress, 4/11/1836, 1: <The petition of the undersigned heirs and representatives of Colonel Daniel Boone, deceased, respectfully represent: That the said Daniel Boone entered the Service of his country at a very early period, when under the Colonial Government, was in the service of the State of Virginia, & held commissions from the Executive of that State as Major and susequently as a Colonel. That his military services have been rendered without any compensation from his country. <In 1774, under the orders of Lord Viscount Dunmore, then Governor of Virginia, he was appointed to the command of three garrisons during the memorable campaign against the Shawanese; & after the change of government, he entered the service of the State of Virginia, & subsequently attained the rank of Colonel, having passed through all the interior gradations, in which capacity he distinguished himself as most active, zealous & useful. The battles in which he fought with the Indians during a period of thirteen years, the privations and difficulties he had to undergo, are too notorious to need further illustration. The United States having assumed to pay for the State of Virginia the claims of the officers & soldiers of the the Virginia line for their services during the war, the heirs of those officers are now enjoying its bounty. Col. Boone having participated in those services in conjunction with Genl. George Rogers Clark, Colonels Todd, Trigg and others whose claims have been, as your petitioners understand, allowed and liquidated by the General Government -- they cannot discover if right & justice be consulted, any good reason why the same liberality should not be extended to the heirs of Col. Daniel Boone. The services of Col. Boone to his country have been (with out detracting an atom from the first claims of those brave & worth officers of the Virginia line) equal to those of any officer of that line, although he was not of that line. Still yhour petitioners pray that Congress will take the Subject under consideration, and pass a special act to allow the heirs of Colonel Daniel Boone the same compensation in every respect, as they have already allowed to the heirs of the officers of the Virginia line of the same rank. The fact of his never having received a dollar from his country for the services which he rendered either in land or money, nor any compensation for the great amount of property which was either stolen or captured by the Indians, may not be generally known -- nevertheless, it is strickly true, the number of valuable horses taken or captured by the Indians amount to forty head, besides a number of cattle.> 16S155-158 continued

File: 16S1.DR1



    Created: 6/27/2017 9:46:51 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24475
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24475


1836

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Petition of the Heirs of DB to Congress, 1836, 2: <Had Colonel Boone devoted that portion of his life which was consumed in the service of his country (and of which his country is now enjoying the benefit) to other pursuits, having in view the accumulation of property, his descendants would in all probability have been left in a very different situation from that in which they are now placed. <Relying upon the justice and liberality of Congress, the undersigned confidently expect, that the relief for which they have applied will be extended to them, and, as in duty bound, they will ever pray, &c.> Signed by the following: Daniel M. Boone Nathan Boone Children of Jesse B. Boone, decd: Harriet M. Baber, Panthea G. Boggs, Minerva S. Warner, Alfonso Boone, James Madison Boone, Van D. Boone, Emily Henderson, A.G. Boone Children of Susay Hays, decd: Boone Hays, William Hays, Children of Jemima Callaway, decd: Boone Callaway, Larkin Callaway Children of Lavina Scholl: Joseph Scholl, Jesse B. Scholl, Septinius Scholl, Marcus Scholl Children of Rebecca Goe: Nathan Goe, Tarleton Goe. 16S159-160 continued

File: 16S1.DR1



    Created: 6/27/2017 9:49:26 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24476
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24476


1837-12-14

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Petition of the Heirs of DB to Congress, 1836, 3: 12/14/1837, on motion of Mr. Harrison, the petition was refered to a select committee of Harrison, Hopkins, Southgate, Sawyer, and Dunn. Conclusion of select committee, 7/2/1838: <The important services rendered by Colonel Boon [sic], and the sacrifices of his private property, are parts of the history of the country; and your committee consider that, although the case of Colonel Boone may not have heretofore been provided for by any general law, yet, such were his distinguished services throughout the revolutionary war, that they have come to the conclusion that his case forms a just exception to the general principle, and they report a bill.> [Bill No. 872] 16S160-161

File: 16S1.DR1



    Created: 6/27/2017 9:50:03 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24477
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24477


1785

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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4/20/1785 offers Congress his services as a surveyor of any lands that may be obtained as a result of the treaty council to be held at Vincennes next June. 16S130

File: 16S1.DR1



    Created: 6/27/2017 10:00:16 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24471
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24471


1866-10-14

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Mrs. Louisa Aldridge, daughter of William Brooks, Washington KY, 10/14/1866: William Brooks three years in captivity. <Always spoke well of Col. Boone's conduct on that occasion. Had scars on his wrists and ankles, made by being ironed by the British when in captivity, which remained till his death. He refused to pack for the Indians when first taken a kettle -- threw it down; when they patted him on the head, & called him a "warrior."> After captivity, returned to VA, married, back to KY, settling near Maysville. 20S146

File: 20S1.DR1



    Created: 6/29/2017 8:57:52 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24593
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24593


1866-10-14

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Mrs. Louisa Aldridge, daughter of William Brooks, Washington KY, 10/14/1866: After he returned from captivity, had married, and settled near Maysville (Limestone), Brooks had a negro slave named Will. <Will had a wife and children, but contracted an attachment for some Dinah at a station four miles from Brooks', located where Orangeburg now is, & he would frequently go to visit her. To break off these visits, Capt. Brooks got John Gunsaulus to go & scare Will. So, disguising himself as an Indian, he intercepted Will on one of his perigrinations, in the woods, about midway between Brooks and the little settlement wither he was wending his way.> Gunsaulus surprised Will, led him to think he was being attacked by "a powerful large Indian," chased him to the station, where the people were in on the joke, and refused him entrance, claiming that <there were Indians all around in every direction, and they dare not, on any account, open the gate, lest the savages should rush in & slaughter them all.> Will tore off for Kenton's Station, leading Gunsaulus on a twelve mile run, before getting into safety. <Old Will was at length safe in one of the best stations in the country, and recounted his adventure & wonderful escape with great gusto. Will's good old wife never had further cause to complain of his visits to the Orangeburg beauty. Will died at a good old age, about 1840.> 20S147-49

File: 20S1.DR1



    Created: 6/29/2017 9:00:42 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24594
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24594


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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From the Hinde mss [sic], located in Marshall IL, [LCD later acquired; 4Y]: Benjamin Kelley Adopted into the family of Tecumseh. Was with DB on the Shawnee saltmaking expedition to Scioto. <While manufacturing salt, a company of Indians returned from Greenbriar county, Virginia, & stopped with them, it being on the war path. Boone repeatedly cast a jealous eye upon them. The Indians had been defeated in an attack on a fort on Greenbriar, but the fact was unknown to Boone, who had agreed to take Kelly with him when he should attempt his escape. The whole company started for Old Chillicothe, situated about three miles above Xenia. . . . But after leaving the Salt Lick, and before they reached Paint Creek, Boone, mounted on his pony, fell back, and making, as the Indians thought, too long a delay, they went back in pursuit of him; but he had fled, and left his pony, as it would not travel fast enough -- reached Boonesborough as stated -- fortified it against an attack, but the Indians did not come on until sometime afterwards.> Traveled a distance of some 150 miles in two days and a night [sic]; <Such feats of valor and enterprise can now scarcely be credited.> 20S253-54

File: 20S1.DR1



    Created: 6/29/2017 9:02:18 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24595
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24595


1866-10-17

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with William Cassidy, son of Capt. Michael Cassidy of Cassidy's Station, Flemingsburg KY, 10/17/1866: An Indian cornered in the high grass, shooting at the militiamen. One whiteman ran off bawling "God damn you, don't shoot me!" stumbled over a log. [Was this the Big Jim affair told by Nathan Boone?] 20S192

File: 20S1.DR1



    Created: 6/29/2017 9:03:32 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24596
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24596


1866-10-16

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Francis Cassidy, son of Michael Cassidy of Cassidy's Station, Flemingsburg KY, 10/16/1866: Remembers reading in the paper that DB visited a locality within a mile or two of Winchester KY to establish a corner (after his remove to MO). <Reaching there in the evening, he was so confident he could very nearly identify the corner, though the changes from its primeval condition were great, that he went out by moonlight, & located the spot within a rod of where the corner ash tree stood which was now gone -- & others proved that the tree stood there.> DB visited his father and stayed several days, seeing about old land claims; thinks he also visited a second time. Might have been as early as 1805; Francis Cassidy was born in 1798, and when DB came to house he was only <a chunk of a boy.> 20S200-201

File: 20S1.DR1



    Created: 6/29/2017 9:06:46 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24597
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24597


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Fielding Belt, came to KY with his family in 1794 when 12 yrs old, Upper Blue Licks KY, 10/18/1866 Saw DB after he settled in Fleming, about 1799; was alone, going to the Upper Blue Licks; dressed in hunting shirt, with rifle, horn, and shot pouch. 20S204

File: 20S1.DR1



    Created: 6/29/2017 9:07:46 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24598
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24598


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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From the Hinde mss [sic], located in Marshall IL, [LCD later acquired; 4Y]: Mr. Thomas Spotswood Hinde meets DB: <It was while I was on a paw-paw tramp I first saw Daniel Boone. I saw a tall, raw-boned man, with a hunting shirt on, a rifle on his shoulder, a shot-pouch at his side -- perhaps a tomahawk & csalping knife alwo. He was leading a horse pretty well packed. Following after was a little old woman seated on a horse, also packed, with a sun bonnet on -- both horses with bells. On inquiry I found it was old Colonel Boone. I presume from the date, 1797, that he was on his way to Missouri.> 20S254-55

File: 20S1.DR1



    Created: 6/29/2017 9:09:03 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24599
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24599


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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From the Hinde mss [sic], located in Marshall IL, [LCD later acquired; 4Y]: Thomas Spotswood Hine said (2/1845) that Peck gave him an account of DB's last visit to KY. <Having made a good hunt, he made good sales of his peltry & furs & meat. Visiting his old friends for the last time -- he had kept no books or accounts -- & gave notice to all to whom he was owing anything to come forward and receive it. And when they stated what was their due, he paid it off to the last cent, and bid his old region and friends a final adieu.> 20S255

File: 20S1.DR1



    Created: 6/29/2017 9:13:45 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24600
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24600


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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From the Hinde mss [sic], located in Marshall IL, [LCD later acquired; 4Y]: According to Thomas Spotswood Hine: DB enjoyed excellent health until his death; was <active and stirring about his farm and sugar-camp; but out during the hunting season ascending the Missouri three hundred miles to find the buffalo.> 20S255-256

File: 20S1.DR1



    Created: 6/29/2017 9:16:05 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24601
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24601


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Judge Frederick Hyatt, who came to MO with his uncle William Reed, settled at Boone's Lick 1811, Florissant MO, 5/23/1868: Saw DB in the spring and fall of 1812 and again in 1813 at Boone's Lick. He was up river with a hunting and trapping party in a pirogue; stopped at Boone's Lick a few days both going and returning; out 6-8 weeks. <Col. Boone was then a little stooped.> 22S145

File: 22S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 6:40:01 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24700
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24700


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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People
None.
Interview with Judge Frederick Hyatt, who came to MO with his uncle William Reed, settled at Boone's Lick 1811, Florissant MO, 5/23/1868: Indian Philips: tall spare man; at one time among the Shawnees; with them marauded along the Ohio river in the 1790s; was at Chillicothe when Kenton a prisoner, and whipped him with his ramrod; in MO whites could scare Philips badly by telling him Kenton was in the country; was some 50 years old in 1814. 22S130

File: 22S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 6:40:57 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24701
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24701


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Judge Frederick Hyatt, who came to MO with his uncle William Reed, settled at Boone's Lick 1811, Florissant MO, 5/23/1868: Stephen Hancock <He had in old Colonial times taken an oath to support the King; & on his way to Kentucky, he refused, with perhaps others, to take the new U.S. oath, & was suffered to omit it. [?] He said he gave one half of his Kentucky land to some one to pay the entry & surveying fees -- very common at that early day. In Missouri he had good stock, plenty of grain, was prudent and saving.> 22S146

File: 22S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 6:42:05 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24702
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24702


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Mrs. Elizabeth Musick, daughter of John Sullins who came to MO 1800, near Florrisant MO, 5/1868: Old [Jimmy] Rogers An early Shawnee captive; talked broken English. Was a small man. His village was at Owen's Station, now Bridgeton [across and upriver from St. Charles, downriver from Femme Osage], at a fine spring. Mostly these were Shawnees, but also some Delawares and Miamies. Rogers principal chief; living there in 1800, left about 1803; lived one year on Hefee [?] creek, then moved to Burbeuse creek. Friendly during the War of 1812-15. <They had their dances, when living at Owen's Station, sometimes a drunken spree, when a death would occasionally occur. The squaws made baskets and moccasins & sold them to the whites. The Indians were kind.> Had a squaw and several children. <One of the daughters, the oldest, had a house built for her and she lived separately from the rest of the family in some show of white style, and dressed finely. Her father promised half a bushel of silver to the white man who would marry her. Rogers was reputed wealthy. The daughter was finally married to a white man, & he dying, she married another; but neither, it is believed, got the promised dowry, Old Rogers saying he would wait & see if they proved worthy husbands, for it might be that they would desert her if they should get the money.> Sons Lewis and Jim were grown men in 1800. <Lewis used to relate amusingly his efforts to get a white wife -- quite a handsome girl who seemed to court his attentions. But in this case the course of true love did not run smooth. "Ah," said Lewis, "she was mighty nice, pretty dress -- she wanted to know when I come again -- I tell it her, but didn't go then -- me thought me go when she no expecting me -- did so, & found her dirty, every thing all scattered around -- ashes on hearth; then think it best I'll not marrit [sic] her, and did not go any more."> 22S168-170

File: 22S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 6:43:37 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24703
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24703


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Mrs. Elizabeth Musick, daughter of John Sullins who came to MO 1800, near Florrisant MO, 5/1868: Joab Barton Captured as a boy; had a squaw and one child; lived among Roger's band of Shawnees. Regarded as rich. Abandoned the Indians for the white settlements, married a white woman and had his Indian daughter raised by the whites and educated, and married a white man and did well. Very sensible, smart, good looking; ears rimmed. Soon acquired white customs, plenty of cattle, money, two negroes. Small and dark complexioned; <Retained Indian habits to the last.> 22S170

File: 22S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 6:44:22 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24704
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24704


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Stephen Hempstead, came to MO in 1808 to join his brother Edward who came earlier, Callaway county MO, 6/6-8/1868: He visited DB in the early fall of 1808, when the paw paws were ripe; DB and wife residing with Nathan; also spent some of his time at daughter Jemima's, who resided at the mouth of Charette creek with husband Flanders Callaway. The day before DB had been out hunting with Nathan's son James, and they had shot a paroquet from the top of a tall tree, wounded it in the tip of the wing, brought it home alive and presented it to Hempstead. That day DB out squirrel hunting, brought in some game. 1809 DB had a skin disease affecting all the outer scarp [sic], scaling off, and his eyes were red. Treated by Dr. Moseley residing at St. Charles; DB with wife <and a black woman cook> went to stay at St. Charles, engaged a vacant house and were loaned furniture and utensils by Hempstead and others. Remained several wkks until recovered. Lived across from Hempstead. 22S181-82

File: 22S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 6:45:48 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24705
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24705


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Stephen Hempstead, came to MO in 1808 to join his brother Edward who came earlier, Callaway county MO, 6/6-8/1868: With Squire isolated in camp because of heavy rains. Squire, impatient and disgruntled, to DB: "I believe you would be satisfied to remain here forever." DB: "You would do better not to fret about it, but try to content yourself with what we can not help." After the waters subsided they went to the river bottom and saw where the high water had driven off the Indians: "See what fretted you so much was really the means of Providence for our salvation -- but for the storm we should have run into the very jaws of our enemies." 22S182-3

File: 22S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 6:47:08 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24706
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24706


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Stephen Hempstead, came to MO in 1808 to join his brother Edward who came earlier, Callaway county MO, 6/6-8/1868: Callaways wanted to land on the opposite shore, but Jemima resisted; Callaways jested that she was simply afraid of the "yellow boys." <While thus pleasantly bandying words> the canoe drifted toward the shore and an Indian jumped from the bushes into the water and seized the canoe tug, pulling it to shore. At the rescue: <Betsey Callaway had the other two children's head in her lap, & had fallen asleep from weariness, & Betsey shedding tears from the hopelessness of their situation, & sort of running her fingers gently through the sleeping girls hair.> DB and party come up, see Indians making fire, etc. DB <with his quick eye saw the silent weeping of Betsey Callaway, & it so touched his feelings, that his first thought was, to fire on the Indians; but knowing it was not prudent to do so, he quietly withdrew, & soon brought up the others, & fired n the Indians -- killing one Indians -- when the others made a rush towards the rigls, as if more intent to kill the prisoners than to screen themselves -- but the moment of the guns fired Betsey Callaway jumped up, & ran with a girl holding to either hands, towards whence the firing proceeded, & the Indians, one of whom was wounded at the first fire, now failing to wreak their vengence on the girls, tried to escape, but were killed.> 22S183-186

File: 22S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 6:48:16 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24707
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24707


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Stephen Hempstead, came to MO in 1808 to join his brother Edward who came earlier, Callaway county MO, 6/6-8/1868: DB remembered being tied with a rope and being led to drink like a horse; and being jerked back from the water to annoy him. He did everything to gain their confidence. Finally they let him hunt, measuring out the power and ball; when he returned with game, he would give them the unused amunition. He resolved from the first to run away, and would shoot two deer with one shot, and secret his extra amunition. Thus he managed to store up for his escape. He left when an <irrepressible desire possessed him to start.> 22S186-187

File: 22S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 6:49:10 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24708
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24708


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Stephen Hempstead, came to MO in 1808 to join his brother Edward who came earlier, Callaway county MO, 6/6-8/1868: In MO would spent the winter hunting with Flanders Callaway, Derry, and another negro; up the Osage, the Gasconade, Lemine; went every fall; quite successful, selling loads of furs at St. Louis. Saw him land at St. Charles in 1810 or 1811 with a canoe load of furs, on his way to sell them in St. Louis. Not disturbed by Indians; hunted in a neutral region. Both Nathan and Flanders tried to persuade him not to go out on long hunts in which he was exposed to the harsh winter. <But he had an unconquerable dsire to go as the hunting season approached -- & loved to live in the wild woods, & live on game of his own killing & cooking. They thought he was too old for such exposures, but he was unhappy to remain at home & would go.> 22S188-189

File: 22S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 6:50:35 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24709
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24709


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Stephen Hempstead, came to MO in 1808 to join his brother Edward who came earlier, Callaway county MO, 6/6-8/1868: Mild and equable. She quiet and pleasant. 22S189

File: 22S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 6:51:37 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24710
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24710


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Louis DeNoya, born St. Louis, Callaway county MO, 6/6/1868: Saw DB and Flanders Callaway up the Osage 100 miles trapping beaver in the fall of 1808. Very successful. Had to keep a fireless camp, no shooting, to avoid Indians. 22S212

File: 22S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 6:52:49 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24711
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24711


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Capt. Samuel Boone, son of George Boone, brother of DB, Williamsborg MO, 6/12-13/ 1868: Informant was visited by DB at his home on Prairie Fork of Loutre in 8/1820. DB had been at his son Jesse's, who lived only a mile off. Stayed about a week; they walked about, talked over his old adventures; very interesting. <Even the black people would listen with eager eyes & open ears to his narratives. He appeared quite smart and pert, was very inquisitive, wishing to know all about every matter brought to his attention. He spoke of his efforts in life to do to others as he would wish them to do to him -- wronging no man -- had paid his just debts -- been charitable to the poor, & trusted in the mercy of God. He said he had taken many a nice nap in his coffin. At length, Col. Boone started with his nephew, my informant, in the latter's wagon to Charette, to Flanders Callaway's, about forty miles, & night overtaking them, they camped . . . . Spread down some bed clothes on the grass, had a pleasant summer night. A heavy dew fell upon the sleepers: Horses were tied up to the wagon & fed -- & had brought food along. The next morning Col. Boone complained of head ache -- & so Sl. Boone left him ailing at Callaway's at Charette.> 22S259-260

File: 22S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 6:54:14 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24712
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24712


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Samuel Mosby Grant, grandson of William Grant and Elizabeth Boone, sister of DB, Williamsburg MO, 6/11-12/1868: Grandfather married Betsey Boone in 1750; at wedding a "Dutchman" said to him: <"Well, Billy, Betsey will make you a good wife if you will take her down at the first loaf," that is, she was a beautiful woman & rather proud, & needed kind subduing.> They came to KY in 1779 with DB. 22S234

File: 22S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 6:55:46 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24713
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24713


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Samuel Mosby Grant, grandson of William Grant and Elizabeth Boone, sister of DB, Williamsburg MO, 6/11-12/1868: Visited DB in 6/1816; found him sprightly and erect; seemed to enjoy life, very cheerful, in fine health. Living with Nathan; just returned from a long hunt up the MO. 22S235

File: 22S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 6:57:20 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24714
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24714


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Mrs. Erretta Burt, grandmother was Susan Boone Hays, greatgranddaughter of DB, MO, ca 1868: <Often saw her ancestor Col. Dl. Boone, often sat on his lap: He used to sing to her, & was fond of little children. . . . Saw his coffin, he was then rubbing it with a red silk handkerchief. The first was a poor one, & he did not like it, & he had a good black walnut one made as he wished it.> 22S240-241

File: 22S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:00:34 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24715
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24715


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Capt. Samuel Boone, son of George Boone, brother of DB, Williamsborg MO, 6/12-13/ 1868: Samuel Bryan came to KY to visit with his father; visited DB and family; then came to his father's house to stay because George Boone married a sister of Samuel's [like DB and Ned?]; says Samuel Bryan had gone to England about some claims from the British government. Only other Bryan to take the British side was Samuel's brother Thomas. Samuel <was entirely broken up by the war.> 22S244-45

File: 22S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:01:51 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24716
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24716


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Capt. Samuel Boone, son of George Boone, brother of DB, Williamsborg MO, 6/12-13/ 1868: McGary yelled out: <"All who are not cowards, follow me, & I'll show where the yellow dogs are." We are no cowards, retorted the others, but the contagion was irresistable -- the taunt of cowardice was unpalitable [sic] to a Kentuckian, & stung [sic?] them on to recklessness.> <Col. B. always deplored Israel's death.> 22S264-265

File: 22S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:02:32 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24717
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24717


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with John Scholl, son of Peter and Mary Boone Scholl, she daughter of Edward Boone, DB's brother; Informant first visited MO in 1808; saw DB; living with wife at home of Daniel Morgan; in a double house, entry between, DB and Rebecca occupying one part. DB took many short hunts; doesn't know about long ones. DB spoke to him about his ill-treatment in KY <how by altering the laws, & by the quirks of the lawyers, he lost all his lands there -- & but for a friends [sic] there, he should never ever think of Ky.> 22S273

File: 22S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:04:47 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24718
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24718


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with John Scholl, son of Peter and Mary Boone Scholl, she daughter of Edward Boone, DB's brother; Williamsburg, Callaway county MO, 6/13-14/1868: Philip Goe a great drunkard, very dissipated; wasted all his property, then drank himself to death in Bourbon county KY. Rebecca, his wife, had consumption, soon followed her husband. 22S273

File: 22S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:06:06 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24719
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24719


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Samuel Cole, Cooper county MO, 6/18-19/1868: Saw DB many times in MO; his last long hunt shortly before War of 1812; had a dangerous encounter with a bear; after than DB declared he ought not to venture out alone at his age. <Mr. Cole says he had subbed Col. Boone's body many an hour of a kind of scrofulous, dry scales, & the Col. would relate his old narratives & adventures to him in return for rubbing him. He was then living with Nathan Boone, for it was in 1815, just after Jas. Callaway was killed that Mrs. W.. T. Cole & family went down & lived on Nathan Boone's farm that year & raised a crop there to recruit from the disasters of the war. In the door yard was a nice black walnut tree, under the spreading shade of which Col. Boone, in the warm season, had his couch, a blanket or dressed skin & pillow, a chair when he preferred it, & spent much of his leisure time there. He did not, as remembered, attempt then to hunt himself; but would be rejoiced when informant, then a youth, would kill a deer at a deer lick, up a little branch putting into the Femme Osage, on the south side of the creek, & about a mile & a quarter from N. Boone's, who lived on the north side of the creek. On all such occasions, Col. Boone would receive a generous share of the venison -- his favority meat. He used to read books some.> 23S82-83

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:08:20 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24720
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24720


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Samuel Cole, Cooper county MO, 6/18-19/1868: <The squaws in the spring took him out into their cornpatches to hoe corn, & he would recklessly hoe up about as much as he would clear, & the squaws became disgusted with his work & would utter words of contempt, equivalent to "fool" -- & finally finding him incorrigible, dismissed him from that service, thus gaining the very end he sought.> 23S87

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:09:51 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24721
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24721


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with James Cole, brother Samuel Cole, Cooper county MO, 6/19/1868: Went hunting and trapping with DB when a boy of 10 or so, in 1811; killed bear, deer, turkeys for the salt-petre makers at the mouth of Big Piney Fork on the Gasconade (Isaac Van Bibber, Stephen Cole [Sr.?], Thomas Massey) and tended to his traps. 16 traps. Brought back 63 bear skins, six otter, 156 beaver, large number of deer skins. Frequently met Osage hunting parties, all friendly. At the conclusion, furs and salt petre put into three pirogues dug out of large cotton woods; fastened together; floated down the Gasconade. DB took his horses and traps by land to mouth of Gasconade on MO, there met boats; rendezvoused there with Nathan in a keel boat. DB returned hom on horseback. 23S100-102

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:11:17 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24722
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24722


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with James Cole, brother Samuel, Cooper county MO, 6/19/1868: Fall of 1812 DB took a hunting trip with James Cole along; Iowa Indians troublesome; had to hide out, so very little success hunting or trapping. 23S103

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:13:40 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24723
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24723


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Mrs. Frances Campbell, daughter of Sarshal Cooper, Howard county MO, ca. 1868: DB, Michael Stoner, James Bridges went up MO trapping in pirogues in ca. fall of 1810. Returned with a great quantity of furs. James Bridges made his home for much of the time with the Coopers; had been maried when young but had separated from his wife. On the trip Stoner said to Bridges: "I wish to ask you a question, & wish you to promise me to reply frankly to it." "Well, what is it?" "Tell me your resons for separating from your wife." "Well, do you think you can keep a secret?" "Yes, I think I can." "And I think I can too," <quietly retorted Bridges, & than ended the conversation.> 23S107-108

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:15:34 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24724
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24724


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Mrs. Susan Callaway Howell, daughter of Flanders and Jemima Boone Callaway, St. Charles MO, 7/12/1868: Before the seige, 1777? Children sent out of the fort to gather wood for breakfast fires; they scurry back to the fort telling of seeing Indians at the fence corners, but reports dismissed as a way of getting out of the chore. Flanders and two other men went to the corncrib to gather corn; Flanders and one other left their guns, with instructions to the sentenel to bring them in if there was trouble, and brought corn in; Indians fired at the sentenel, and he fled to the fort, leaving the two guns. Flanders: "I must have my gun, even at the risk of my life, & I'll go for it." other man: "if you go for yours, I will for mine." They stripped to breechclouts and ran for the crib; snatched their guns; ran back; much firing on them, balls whizzing all around their feed. Flanders stubbed his toe and fell, the women from the fort exclaiming "Flanders Callaway is killed!" But jumping up he called out, "I'm not hurt, and scrambled into the fort. 23S226-227

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:17:40 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24725
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24725


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Daniel Boone, son of Daniel Morgan Boone, Westport MO, 6/24/1868: <Used to hear his father D. M. Boone say that when very young, a mere youth, he used to be taken out by Col. Dl. Boone on hunting trips, & camp: & while yet a youth, he & Tice Van Bibber used to hunt and supply meat for the fort at Point Pleasant, & had several narrow escapes from the Indians who chased them.> 23S163-64

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:20:08 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24726
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24726


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Charles Tucker, a Shawnee, Shawnee KS, 6/26-27/1868: Says the Shawnee who migrated to Missouri did so because they were weary of warfare with the Americans; wished to settle in a region in which they could live at peace. Blackfish in Shawnee -- Paheatapeseka; was one of three brothers, one died young, the other a warrior. After the return of white captives, Shawnee women used to steal into KY to visit their former adopted children whom they had raised. 23S172-177

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:21:48 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24727
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24727


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with John Jones, moved to MO in 1799, Franklin county MO, 7/7/1868: Indian Philips -- his first name was Charles. Jimmy Rogers daughter named Nancy; like son Lewis was quite fair, but son Jim very dark. This puzzeled the chief, who would say: "Jim, he all Indian." Promised a bushel of dollars to the white man who would marry Nancy, provided he would "work it well and hunt it well." Two white men married her, but neighter got the promised dollars. 23S210,218

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:22:51 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24728
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24728


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Mrs. Susan Callaway Howell, daughter of Flanders and Jemima Boone Callaway, St. Charles MO, 7/12/1868: Flanders went out trapping every fall and winter. DB went with him before the War of 1812. Because the Indians so respected and feared the Chouteau's, when bothered by them in camp, Flanders would point to his initials on the pelts and say "Chouteau," and the Indians would leave him and his furs alone, although they would steal his horses, etc. 23S220-221

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:24:01 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24729
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24729


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Mrs. Susan Callaway Howell, daughter of Flanders and Jemima Boone Callaway, St. Charles MO, 7/12/1868: She had a son in 1/1817; DB <holding the little fellow in his lap, asked the privilege of naming him -- this was cheerfully accorded. "Call him, then, Amazon -- after the largest & noblest river in the world." He was so named, & is now at Red Mountain Bluff, in perhaps Idaho Territory. Don't remember what called Col. Boone's attention to the Amazon river -- probably had been reading about it.> 23S221

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:25:14 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24730
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24730


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Mrs. Susan Callaway Howell, daughter of Flanders and Jemima Boone Callaway, St. Charles MO, 7/12/1868: Long Seige. DB hit with a ball in the neck; came to Jemima to take a look; <had her take off his stock [a close fitting neck cloth, wound about the collar fitting the shirt to the neck] & see the extent of it -- felt it smart, & thought it was slight flesh wound; but when he loosened & removed the stock, the blood spirted out so as to alarm Mrs. Callaway; but it was bandaged & checked, & Col. Boone was persuaded to remain partially quiet awhile, by lying down on a bed in his cabin.> <The Indians at length, not hearing Col. Boone's well known voice, called out with a rough curse -- "we know we have killed Captain Boone; for we haven't heard anything from him for a long time." "No, you have not, I am here, ready for you red rascals," Boone would respond.> 23S223

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:26:00 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24731
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24731


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Mrs. Susan Callaway Howell, daughter of Flanders and Jemima Boone Callaway, St. Charles MO, 7/12/1868: <The Indians had taken a small negro, & raised him, Pompey.> He thrust his head up over the embankment and was shot and killed. 23S223

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:26:33 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24732
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24732


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Mrs. Susan Callaway Howell, daughter of Flanders and Jemima Boone Callaway, St. Charles MO, 7/12/1868: Indians wanted to DB to show them his daughter, whom he had told them about during his captivity. To humor and delay the negotiations further, he argued with them about this for a time; finally had Jemima step into the open gate; Richard Callaway there to protect her. Some Indians ran up, wanted to touch her, perhaps to spirit her away and use her to extort surrender of the fort; but Callaway lowered his cocked rifle and with curses warned them to back off. 23S224

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:27:12 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24733
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24733


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Mrs. Susan Callaway Howell, daughter of Flanders and Jemima Boone Callaway, St. Charles MO, 7/12/1868: At word of the girl's kidnapping, DB, who was taking a Sunday nap in his bed, snatched his pantallons, putting them on as he ran. The rescue: Girls were sitting on a log, two younger girls crying and lying in Betsey's lap. Gun fire, Jemima exclaimed: "That's daddy's gun!" One of the rescuers: "Let us all have a good cry for joy." Jemima said that despite their appearance, their dresses cut short, etc., they were so excited they felt no sense of shame. 23S229-31

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:27:49 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24734
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24734


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Mrs. Susan Callaway Howell, daughter of Flanders and Jemima Boone Callaway, St. Charles MO, 7/12/1868: Heard this story from her mother. Indians came in to the shed while DB working. "Ah, Capt. Boone, we have got you now; going to take you to Detroit; come down; we had you once, but you got away from us." DB said he must fix his tobacco, would come down soon; began amusing them by inquiring after his old Indian friends. After he escaped his old Shawnee friends cursed themselves as fools, Boone as a rascal. 23S231

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:28:50 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24735
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24735


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Mrs. Susan Callaway Howell, daughter of Flanders and Jemima Boone Callaway, St. Charles MO, 7/12/1868: At Chillicothe was first assigned to the squaws; had to watch Blackfish's two daughters Pinnepussy and Pannepussy; he got very much attached to them. His escape: Men break off to surround the game at the lick; Boone managed to delay and get behind by getting his kettles all twisted out of fix, hopping off to fix them; finally left with only his "old mamma." He cut the kettles and galloped off, the old squaw screaming after the warriors. 23S233

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:29:39 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24736
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24736


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with John H. Corseley, Mechanicsville, St. Charles county MO, ca. 1868: Says that in 3/1816 was 50 miles up the Gasconade and there saw DB and two or three others standing on the riverbank with his gun. Was on a trapping expedition. 23S238

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:30:34 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24737
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24737


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Elijah Bryan, born 1799, emigrated to MO with DB party in 1800, St. Charles county MO, 7/13/1868: DB <among the most powerful made men he ever knew, very straight, about 5 feet 6 to 8 inches: heavy made, thick thighs, & very small ankle. He was very industrious, in matters in which he was interested, very careful, good in providing for his family.> 23S243

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:31:48 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24738
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24738


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Elijah Bryan, born 1799, emigrated to MO with DB party in 1800, St. Charles county MO, 7/13/1868: Saw DB with Flanders Callaway going to trap in the fall of ca. 1810. Flanders took his negro Mose along; as he said, "to chew my venison for me;" since he was toothless, Mose would cut and pound the venison on a log so Callaway could eat it. 23S243

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:32:35 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24739
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24739


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Elijah Bryan, born 1799, emigrated to MO with DB party in 1800, St. Charles county MO, 7/13/1868: Fall 1805 DB with Nathan and Daniel Morgan went over MO to Gasconde, on return, about Christmas, tried to cross frozen MO; DB broke through ice up to his armpits; sons tried to save him, but he warned them off, ice too thin; he saved himself from near death. 23S244

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:33:16 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24740
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24740


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Elijah Bryan, born 1799, emigrated to MO with DB party in 1800, St. Charles county MO, 7/13/1868: Samuel Bryan was treated "meanly" by the British, despite his losses during the war. 23S245

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:33:46 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24741
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24741


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Elijah Bryan, born 1799, emigrated to MO with DB party in 1800, St. Charles county MO, 7/13/1868: William Hancock The night of his escape, his captor stayed up late talking to him; finally William pretended to fall asleep; Indian: "Billy's tired & gone to sleep, & I'll go to sleep too." 23S246

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:34:33 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24742
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24742


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Elijah Bryan, born 1799, emigrated to MO with DB party in 1800, St. Charles county MO, 7/13/1868: Blackfish gave DB to his wife to supervise. Set him to hoeing corn; DB hoed up both weeds and corn; the old squaw came to whip him, but he waved the hoe in threat, and pushed them over. Blackfish watched the scene in amusement: "My son, you need not work any more in the corn." 23S247

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:35:15 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24743
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24743


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Elijah Bryan, born 1799, emigrated to MO with DB party in 1800, St. Charles county MO, 7/13/1868: DB's Congress grant of 1000 acres <did him no good -- 500 went to Jas. Bridges to satisfy an old claim, he deeded it in May 1815.> This Bridges was the old pioneer and trapper. 23S249

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:35:58 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24744
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24744


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Mrs. Susan Callaway Howell, daughter of Flanders and Jemima Boone Callaway, and Elijah Bryan, both St. Charles MO, 7/12-13/1868: According to Mrs. Howell: DB was <in the habit not of relating an entire narrative of an event, but such part as might illustrate something under consideration -- commencing with "this reminds me of such a fact in point when I was a captive" &c. Mr. Bryan agreed: When he was a boy he suffered a snakebite, there was no doctor around, and DB took care of him, and while attending to him <would tell many a pioneer or Indian incident having a bearing upon his case, & this to interest and amuse his young patient.> 23S248

File: 23S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 7:37:20 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24745
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24745


1868-10

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with John Arrowsmith, Mt. Pleasant IA, grandson of Simon Kenton; 10/17-19/1868: Kenton told him that he was travelling leisurely along in 1775 and discovered a person approaching <apparently, as he thought, an Indian -- so nearly dressed like one.> Both simultaneously "treed" as a matter of self-preservation, within shooting distance. This somewhere near the Blue Licks. Eyed and watched each other cautiously; finally one called out to the other; they conversed at distance, and one proposed they meet in the middle, leaving weapons behind. 24S86

File: 24S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 8:02:03 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24761
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24761


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with James Long, moved as a boy of about 10 to MO in 1797, Bon Homme settlement; St. Louis county MO, ca 1868: Says that honey bees appeared in MO about 1800. <The simple-hearted French people would take a tumbler or cup & run & try to catch a couple, under the impression that from a single pair they could easily multiply the number till they should have all they wanted.> Bees followed the Americans into the country, and they were soon found in plenty in the woods. 24S155-156

File: 24S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 8:02:55 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24762
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24762


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with James Long, moved as a boy of about 10 to MO in 1797, Bon Homme settlement; St. Louis county MO, ca 1868: Old Rogers band of Shawnee amounted to about 25 men. He had been captured very early, and had become "a perfect Indian." He had been involved in waylaying river men along the Ohio, playing the decoy, pretending to be an escaped prisoner, getting boats to land, and they participating in murder and robbery with his fellow warriors. Rogers used to say of his two boys: <"Lewis would speak to the paper, but the Indians would get Jim" -- that is, Lewis took to learnign quite readily, while Jim evinced himself a thorough Indian and averse to books and improvement.> In the fall of 1798 Rogers band wintered on Bon Homme, then went to the crossing of Berbeuse creek and remained there several years. He was an old rascal; had become wealthy; offered money to the white man who would marry his daughter. Another white man with this band, a large, heavy formed man, was named "Fish." Another white, Joab Barton; had quite an Indian appearance; but didn't live with Rogers band. Wore long black hair, dangling down behind like a woman. About 1799 married Abraham Musick's daughter; she was pretty; lived together for a time, but thinks they later separated. 24S164-65

File: 24S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 8:03:55 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24763
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24763


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Samuel Conway, born in MO 1799; St. Louis county, MO, ca 1868: Joab Barton married Miss Musick, a beautiful girl; he had come to MO with the Shawnees and looked much the Indian. Shawnee chief Rogers and his band was at the location of Owen's Station; moved about 1804. His two sons Lewis and Jim both volunteered and served with the Americans in the War of 1812. 24S168

File: 24S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 8:04:51 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24764
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24764


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Uel Musick, to MO with family in 1794; Franklin county MO, ca 1868: Chief Rogers, the white Shawnee, got his money, perhaps, by robbing river boatmen along the Ohio. Had been taken prisoner when a boy. Son Jim would not go to school; Rogers: "God damn, I think Indian make it Jim, won't go to school." Lewis went to KY and received a pretty fair common school education. 60 men in his band. Offered $1000 to the white man who would marry Nancy, his daughter; but when married, never paid. Joab Barton younger than Rogers; taken prisoner in KY when a boy [LCD: taken at or near Boonesborough in 1779]. He married a Miss A. Musick, by whom he had a son and daughter. 24S190-91

File: 24S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 8:05:40 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24765
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24765


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Mrs. Elizabeth McCourtney, born in MO 1794; Franklin county MO, 6/3-4/1868: Old James Rogers married to a halfbreed, sister to the man called Fish. Rogers said he used to decoy rivermen ashore along the Ohio, rob them. Told her father [James McCourntey, father-in-law?] that he once captured a white woman that way; his companions wanted to take her "for a wife," [that is to have sex with her]; and he ended the dispute by cutting off her breasts and making his companions each eat some, then killed her. McCourtney was so outraged at this cool recital of such a barbarous act that he chased Rogers with the intention of killing him, but he managed to get away. Rogers band did not exceed 40 men; lived at Owen's Station. When Americans assumed sovereignty, and there was rumor of taxes, they moved off. Daughter Nancy married an American and did not go when the band removed to Burbeuse. Two other daughters, all good looking. Nancy's husband a Mr. McGist. Of his two sons he would say: "Lewis white man; but Indian make it Jim -- he all Indian." Joab Barton may have lived among this band; he married Ann Music, very pretty. 24S200-202

File: 24S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 8:07:11 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24766
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24766


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Joseph Scholl, son of Joseph Scholl and Lavina Boone; Callaway county MO, 6/15-16/1868: DB used to say that Flanders Callaway was the best shot he ever knew under pressure in an Indian fight; he was cool and collected. He was medium size, swarthy, and had singularly black, keen eyes. 24S209

File: 24S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 8:08:25 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24767
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24767


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Joseph Scholl, son of Joseph Scholl and Lavina Boone; Callaway county MO, 6/15-16/1868: 'Cage Callaway told him that DB could have escaped much earlier, but remeined in the hope of getting Callaway away with him; but could not. When DB ascertained the eminance of an attack on Booneseborough, he at once escaped. Indians pursued, but returned saying "Boone is lost, we went so -- so," indicating a zigzag route on the ground with their fingers, indicating they thought he was bewildered and lost. When first taken to the Shawnee towns, he was given over to the squaws to wash all the white blood out of him; he resisted at first, thinking they were going to drown him [this, of course, is the story of James Smith]> 24S109-211

File: 24S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 8:09:25 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24768
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24768


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Joseph Scholl, son of Joseph Scholl and Lavina Boone; Callaway county MO, 6/15-16/1868: His uncle Abram Scholl, who was in the fight, told him that DB's wing fought longer than the other two. DB <rather blamed himself in some degree for the Blue Lick battle. He said that at the council preceding the crossing of the river, he said: "You see the Indians have shown themselves on the hills beyond the river, loiteringly, as if to invite pursuit -- there are the two ravines there, filled with brush & timber, for their protection: It is not wise for us to run heedlessly into the trap so artfully set for us. Now, I propose taking a party and reconnoitering in their rear, by going around for that purpose." This was opposed by some one, saying: "We came to fight Indians, & here they are," & then insinuated that perhaps Col. Boone was afraid to meet the Indians. This so nettled Col. Boone, that he retorted, "If you are determined to go & meet the enemy at this great disadvantage, go on; I can go as far in an Indian fight as any other man." His caution was misconstrued into cowardice, & he let his zeal get the better of his judgement.> Abram Scholl said that the buffalo would drink the brackish water of the Licking, then their appetites would be so sharpened they ate every green thing for a great distance around; hence there wa no cover where the battle was fought. Isreal Boone, because of his youth and sprightliness, could have easily made his escape; but he remained to protect his father. Abram saw him with the blood spouting out of his wound, indicating that he had been shot with a very large ball. 24S212-15

File: 24S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 8:10:04 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24769
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24769


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Joseph Scholl, son of Joseph Scholl and Lavina Boone; Callaway county MO, 6/15-16/1868: <It was related in early times in Missouri, that when the aged Indians first saw bees west of the MIssissippi, they wept, regarding it as the precursor of the coming of the hated white man into their country.> 24S216

File: 24S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 8:10:47 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24770
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24770


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Joseph Scholl, son of Joseph Scholl and Lavina Boone; Callaway county MO, 6/15-16/1868: Said that in time of Indian alarm in Limestone, people would come dashing into DB's store anxiously asking: "Where's Col. Boone?" An old negro called Abe would say: "Why de debil dont dey go to doing something, and not be asking all the while for Col. Boone." 24S217

File: 24S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 8:11:26 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24771
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24771


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
Interview with Joseph Scholl, son of Joseph Scholl and Lavina Boone; Callaway county MO, 6/15-16/1868: DB used to say that when in camp at night, he could, by laying his ear to the ground, hear the slightest treat of an Indian or animal around the camp. 25S217

File: 24S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 8:12:15 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24772
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24772


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Joseph Scholl, son of Joseph Scholl and Lavina Boone; Callaway county MO, 6/15-16/1868: DB used to say that a man needed only three things to be happy: a good gun, a good horse, and a good wife. 24S217

File: 24S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 8:12:59 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24773
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24773


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Joseph Scholl, son of Joseph Scholl and Lavina Boone; Callaway county MO, 6/15-16/1868: Mrs [Harriet Boone] Baber told him that she read Bryan's book to DB; he told her it <contained a historical basis, yet it was too highly colored and exaggerated, and he didn't like it.> 24S218

File: 24S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 8:13:39 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24774
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24774


1868

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Joseph Scholl, son of Joseph Scholl and Lavina Boone; Callaway county MO, 6/15-16/1868: DB and Daniel Morgan Boone went on a hunt in ca. 1804 up the MO. Rouding a grove of timber they came upon a party of Indians so near that they could not avoid going forward to meet them; acted friendly. Daniel Morgan had a fine new gun loaned him by Joseph Scholl Sr., and an Indian, seeing this, eagerly examined every part of it, and took it for himself, handing Daniel Morgan in return a rusty and nearly worthless old musket. As the Indians departed, Daniel Morgan asked his father for his gun, saying he was not about to loos this fine rifle without a fight. DB replied that they should feel thankful to be getting off with such a small loss. 24S219-220

File: 24S1.DR1



    Created: 6/30/2017 8:14:24 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-24775
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-24775


1787

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Limestone Treaty 1787 Speeches 1: Capt. Johnny, chief commander of the Shawnees, to Col. Logan: <We have sent for Logan to let him know our opinion. He shall soon know our opinion from our very hearts. I heard your words, by which I was informed not to be afraid to come in & exchange for my prisoners. I was not afraid, but our people is scattered so far apart that it took me a great deal of trouble, to which I made all the industry I could to get all the prisoners I could from our young brothers, for which I was two moons out on the Wabash towns amongst the rest of our younger brothers, which I found out their opinion. All those that had prisoners said, they would not give them up to their brothers the Big Knife, which was one half the town; those that had none, pled to take pity on the women and children, to give them up to get their prisoners from the white people. When I was there, I looked back where I lived, where our old towns were, I looked to be alone, or like a man among children. I could by no means get prisoners from the others. I heard one brothers word, and believed it, and meant to come in myself. All my town is for peace, the one half of the Picaway town, and the half of Chilacotha town, the half of Chespeco town also, and the half of Wacatomica, of which all say let us take pity on our women and children, and agree to make peace with our brother the Big Knife, which our brother the Big Knife has always said was in our power -- if we want peace, we shall have peace, to which we are agreed, to come back to where our old town was burn, & live like brothers.> continued

File: 33S1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:03:04 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-25098
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-25098


1787

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Limestone Treaty 1787 Speeches 2: <These other Indians that are for war, they will be always out on the Wabash, and w'll make a distinction between oursleves, to let our brother Big Knife know we are for real peace. Here will be five little towns of us that will be fore peace, and will trade to our brother Big Knife, and use all industry we can to get as many prisoners as we can. Our women have talked to us to take pity on them, and to make peace that we may live in peace and plenty. When we heard their speech, we took pity on them all that we now for peace. These others that are for war, took no pity on their women and children. We want to let our women & children live in peace & plenty. Now we took it on ourselves to be as poor people, on account as the rest of our brothers would take no pity on us to get our prisoners, but we hope through time we will be able to redeem them all; then we will live in peace & plenty like brothers. All our young main chierfs are for peace. Of those other towns, there are none but some wild young fellows that will be out on the Wabash, that will be for war; we cannot do any thing with them. Paper and time are scarce, for which I am hopes of being excused.> continued

File: 33S1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:04:13 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-25099
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-25099


1787

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Limestone Treaty 1787 Speeches 3: Response to Capt. Johnny by Col. Logan: <Friends & Brothers, <I hope we have met here in peace; & in the first place, to consider the tedious & bloody war we have been emgaged in with each other. You may well remember that ten years ago, we were all governed by one King, over the great waters. But it hath so happened, that our father the King, and the great men of Congress of the United States, commenced a war, and your father the King, engaged you on his part, and the Congress engaged us on their part. And you and us lived nearly in one country, it hath been our fortune to attack each other, and have spilt much blood in our land; many of our people have fell into your hands, and some of your people have fell into our hands. <Brothers, <You may see plainly, how your father over the water that engaged you in so long and bloody a war, hath treated you -- that altho' you lost many brave warriors, yet when he got best by the great men of the United States, he made a peace, and gave your country away, and said nothing about you, but left you to the discretion of the Americans to treat you as they pleased. <Brothers, <You and all the red people may plainly see when you father & all his forces, together with all yours, could not conquer the Americans, that it will be in vain for you (the red people to continue a war yourselves alone; it is time, you may kill a few old men and old women, in different parts of the country, but this wil do you no service, but harm; for we then can go to all the towns in your country, and destroy all your living.> continued

File: 33S1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:05:12 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-25100
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-25100


1787

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Limestone Treaty 1787 Speeches 4: <Brothers, <Let us not think of these bloody designs any longer; let us live at peace, and prevent your old father the King from laughing at us, when we are fighting and destroying one another, and think he will get our country for his own people. <Brothers, <There are a great many designing men in this country, and some may encourage you to go to war, because they know if you do, that you will be drove out of the country, and then they can go and live where you do, & laugh how they have fooled you. This will surely be the case, and it is you and us must fight the battle. When your country will lie waste, then the Americans will sell it, but if you will live at peace & keep possession of it, I expect the people of the United States in America will not take it from you, so you can be a happy people, & live in your own land.> continued

File: 33S1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:06:16 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-25101
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-25101


1787

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Limestone Treaty 1787 Speeches 5: <As to the prisoners, I am sorry you have not gotten Young Prince, but he lives very well. I hope this is not the last time we are to see each other, or to exchange prisoners. Our desire is, to have our prisoners, whose names we gave in to you, and after they are exchanged, they that have prisoners with you, must purchase them from you as they can. The names of those prisoners that we gave you, their people were at the taking of the prisoners from you; they showed themselves like men and women, for that reason we gave them the preference. When I do any business of this kind I call on the Great Man above, to judge me, that I do all things right. I have considered your request in returning the young Pickaway woman & your getting the young Prince; it appears to me it was their future to be both taken at one time, they were equal to me, & I not knowing you wished one more than another, it has been her fortuen to be brought here; now for me to send her back, and bring the young Prince away from his brother, is giving me a great deal of trouble, & I think the Great Man above will not think it justice, & for that reason I cannot do it; but you may be assured, your Prince will be well treated, and he shall be delivered at the next exchange, and you need not be at any trouble, only send the prisoners to Limestone, where Mr. Jacob Boone will receive them, and send yours to you. I have no more to say to you, only advise you, to go home and live at peace: and I will assure you, no army shall march against you from Kentucke. <I am not authorized to treat any farther with you, only wish a friendly trade could be carried on between us. I hope what has been said, will be agreeable to you, and you & I will set our names thereto. <Benjamin Logan, Commr. <Aug. 20, 1787 <Test -- <Isaac Ruddell <John Crow <Daniel Boone <Capt. Johnny, C.C.S.N. [Chief Commander Shawnnoe Nation] <Pemenawah <Manemsechoh <Lathousecoh> Louisville KENTUCKY GAZETTE, 8/25/1787 33S17-25

File: 33S1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:10:44 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-25102
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-25102


1793

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Yahoo: A correspondent from the south fork of Saluda writes <about an extraordinary animal lately found on the Bald Mountain, & other mountains in the Western Territory --: This animal is between twelve & fifteen feet high, & in shape resembling a human being, except the head which is in equal proportion to its body, & draws in somewhat like a terapin; its feet are like those of a negro, about two feet long & hairy, & are of a dark dun color; its eyes are exceedingly large, and open up and down its face; the hair of its head is about six inches long, stands straight like a negro's; its nose is like that of the human species, only large & inclined to what is called Roman. These animals are bold, & have lately attempted to kill several perons -- in which attempts some of them have been shot. Their principal resort is on the bald mountains, where they lie in wait for travellers; but some have been seen in this part of the country. The inhabitants of this place call it a Yahoo; the Indians, however, give it the name of Chickly-Cudly.> Louisville KENTUCKY GAZETTE, 5/23/1793 33S183

File: 33S1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:11:53 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-25103
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-25103


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Col. John Floyd to Col. William Preston, Holston, 4/15/1775: <My Dear Sir -- I have to inform you that I have just now met several persons lately from Powell's Valley, & that the Indians (what nations they can't tell) are determined that the country shall not be settled. Inclosed you have a true copy of a letter from Capt. Boone to Col. Henderson, wrote from a copy which I know to be Capt. Cocke's handwriting. I shall go on, though I declare it appears to me that my journey will be lost. I heard by one of Capt. Russell's neighbors that there was an express sent from Fort Blair to him to come out immediately, for that the Indians had destroyed 20 families which were going down the Ohio to settle; that they look on themselves to be in the mot imminent danger. Russell was set off on his way to the point before the express came, & did not get it this I only have from the second hand. I hear of many other things, but I will omit writing until I have a more certain account, & will let you know as soon as I can. I scarcely know what steps to take, though I think my company don't seem much intimidated yet. Henderson went from Powell's Valley 8th with about 36 [30?] men to try to join Boone, who had 20. There were numbers returning who had gone great part of the way out. My company are waiting, so that I can't write you all I would, but I will do it from time to time to time [sic] as any thing occurs. I am & ever will be, my dear sir, your most affectionate <Jn. Floyd.> [A copy of DB's letter to Henderson enclosed -- see 3B179-80] 33S264-265

File: 33S1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:13:08 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-25104
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-25104


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Col. John Floyd to Col. William Preston, 4/21/1775: <I am as far on my way to Kentucky as Powell's Valley & within twelve miles of Cumberland Gap, & shall proceed on my way tomorrow. . . . I can't hear of any damage being done since I [last] wrote you. . . . Captain Harrod with forty-two men had arrived at his last years settlement before the McAfee's left them parts; but he had heard nothing of the damage that was said to have been done by the Indians to the familys going down the Ohio, which I before mentioned to you. The people in general deem not to approve of the Governor's instructions with regard to settling the lands, nor with any that I have seen purchase from Henderson; they rather choose to settle as they have done on Holston. When they apply to Kenderson to purchase, he offers them Deeds made from those the Cherokees gave him, & demands their bonds for the moneys he says his title is already sufficient to make conveyances, & talks of having an office of his own to keep records, &c. When I go to the country I shall be better able to judge whether we can do business with so large a company; if I find I cannot, for want of provisions, I shall proceed in the same manner I did last year, & keep as private as possible if there should be any more disturbance with the savages. I imagine I must go into some party where the people do settle in order to lay off the quantity of land necessary to make trial agreeable to his Lordship's instructions: At any rate I cant think of returning before I have done all my business. As to officers' claims I laid off lots enough for the Governor to make a trial how it will be taken. I think there will be but small improvements made this year as many seem confused, & numbers leaving the country. I for my part cannot form any opinion whether it will be very dangerous or not, I am sometimes in hopes it has only been some stragling party of Indians who did the murder, & have left the country; at other times when I consider that the settlement of that land will ruin the hunting ground of the Tawas, Kickapoos & some other nations a little dred the consequence, but I shall in a few months if I live & have an opportunity the better able to inform you.> 33S267-270

File: 33S1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:15:45 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-25105
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-25105


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Col. John Floyd to Col. William Preston, Kentucky Levels, 5/30/1775: <You may yet number me among the living, tho' in a very remote corner of the world. . . . For my part I look down on the persons & settlers in so contemptible a manner that I will not repeat a single sentence. . . . My company are all settled near Green river in the southern waters of the Kentucky, & have erected a little town which they call St. Asaph, where they are making crops of corn. All the settlers have recd. Col. Henderson as proprietor of that side the river Kenticky which is called Transylvania Colony. He has called Boons-Borough (another little town) delegates from all the settlements in order to form some regulations among the people. They are eighteen in muber who have made laws for establishing courts of justice, rules for proceeding therein, also a militia law, an attachment law, a law for preserving the game, & for appointing civil & military officers, &c. The number of inhabitants I think does not exceed 300 in all that I can hear of on these waters. They have about 230 acres of corn growing.> 33S270-73

File: 33S1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:17:44 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-25106
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-25106


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Col. John Floyd to Col. William Preston, 7/28/1775: <I have this summer been very hard set to keep people from settling the officers land. If any one should settle on it, I am doubtful according to the face of affairs at this time, whether it could be determined in our time whether our rights were really good or no. It is not thro' any dislike I have to the country, for I am, I think more pleased this year with it than last. . . . I have such views [?] in raising large crops & stock &c. that I think I can make a fortune in a little time if I can purchase four or five slaves. I shall make a good deal this year by showing land to settlers & directing where they might settle off the surveyed land. I hope my profit if I get many of the warrants now in the office will not be much less than last.> 33S276-77

File: 33S1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:20:09 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-25107
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-25107


1775

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Col. John Floyd to Col. William Preston, Boonesborough, 8/10/1775: Henderson's <repeated kindness to me & his seeming willingness to oblige us both, makes me wish you acquainted. I sent this letter by him, as he hopes to see you before the commissioners go from Fincastle: He has given me up my claims at the Falls for only paying the fees &c, tho' desired I should not make it public. If he should suceed in his purchase, I can get the quantity of land you & I were talking about, at the most reasonable price.> 33S280

File: 33S1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:21:10 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-25108
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-25108


1775-10-06

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Col. John Floyd to Col. William Preston, Boonesborough, 10/6/1775: <I sometimes flatter myself that I have laid the foundation of a fortune sufficient to maintain a companion; that is, with a little of her assitance; but I don't know how it will go, for I am determined to live in this country. . . . The Bishop Todd is also in the very same case as I am, & desires his compliments to you, who will return with me next month. He talks also of getting some clunk of a girl to bring out here next spring, as we are pretty near neighbors, & our plantations improve pretty fast, considering our hirelings are not the most industrious men in the world.> 33S287-88

File: 33S1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:23:41 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-25109
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-25109


1776

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Col. John Floyd to Col. William Preston, Boonesborough, 5/19/1776: <The 1000 [acres] I surveyed for you in 1774 on Elkhorn has 66 acres of corn growing on it & all under a good fence. It is settled by the Bryans & other Tories to the number of 28 men; they talk good & say they don't design to keep forcible possession but would willing purchase the land. I have not been to their town, but have seen some of the company, & by the description of the place, the creek &c., it is certainly yours. My big spring is settled by a man who has his wife and family there, & has made large improvments & is determined, as I am told, to hold the land at the risk of his life. Hundreds are going all through that part of the country building cabins and making improvements; they say they were employed to do so by some of the leading men northward. It is the aredent wish of every person about to settle on the no. side the Kentucky, that the Convention of Virginia would think of & propose some mode of settling those lands: If some such thing is not done, & that very soon, I really fear there will be a civil war among the people. The uneasiness the most of the settlers on this side the river were under some time ago, was settled nearly in the following manner: That the proprietors would not ask any money for lands already sold till September next, in order to give them time to enquire into the validity of their titles, but in the mean time should go on with surveying &c. in order that the bounds of each person's claim might be ascertained, to give those who wanted to settle an opportunity of knowing where the vacant land was. I met Col. Henderson and Williams as I cam out at Cumberland on their return; they intend going immediately to the Virginia Convention, & from thence to the Congress, in order to see what encouragement they meet with respecting their land. Since they have been gone, I am told most of the men about Harrodsburg have reassumed their former resolution of not complying with any of the office rules whatever. Jack Jones, it is said, is at the head of the party & flourishes away prodigiously. All the people out of that neighborhood go on with entering and surveying as usual.> 33S293-295

File: 33S1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:24:54 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-25110
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-25110


1776

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Col. John Floyd to Col. William Preston, Woodstock, 5/27/1776: <The Devil to pay here about land -- pray try to get something done by the Convention with regard to selling those lands, or there'l be bloodshed soon. An election of delegates, I am told, is to be at Harrodsburg 1st of June, to send to Convention in Virga. They solicit people onl the no. side the Kentucky to come & vote, imagining (I suppose) by the people on that side joining them to be all represented as inhabitants of the extreme western parts of Fincastle, in the same manner as West Augusta. Hundreds of wretches come down the Ohio & build pens or cabins, return & sell them; the people come down & settle on the land they purchase; these same places are claimed by some one else, & then quarrels ensue. In short, they now begin to pay no kind of regard to the officers land more than any other. Many have come down here & not stayed more than 3 weeks, & have returned home with 20 cabins a piece, & so on. They make very free with my character, swearing I am engrossing the country & have no warrants for the land, & if I have, they will drive me & the officers, too, to hell.> 33S296-97

File: 33S1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:27:21 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-25111
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-25111


1776

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Col. John Floyd to Col. William Preston, Boonesborough, 6/8/1776: <I have been down to the Cave Spring & seen the person who is settled there: He appears very uneasy & desirious to purchase; his circumstances I don't know, though. I am told he is able to pay. I at the same time paid one McClellan a visit, who lives at the big spring: I went determined to drive him off, but on seeing his wife & three small children, who must have been distressed, I sold it for L300 to be on interest from that time if not punctually paid: I believe he is able enough. The other people who are settled on your land on Elkhorn I have notyet been able to see, but they talk of nothing unreasonable. No surveying of consequence goes on in Transylvania, except for foreigners, & I expect that set about Harrodsburg will soon endeavor to prevent that.> 33S298

File: 33S1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:27:59 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-25112
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-25112


1776

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Col. John Floyd to Col. William Preston, Boonesborough, 7/1/1776: <The surveyors are much abused by Delegate Jones about surveying. . . . That fellow has raised more confusion than all the people who ever came out besides. He exclaims against the officers, surveyors, & allsorts of men -- but the cabiners with whom he is closely connected: In short, they even threaten the lves of poor men who go to live on any of those claims; they have scared off several already who had made considerable improvements. This you may depend on, that if some regulation does not take place to prevent such practices, that this country in a little time will be depopulated. If that wretch should be taken any notice of at the Convention, it will be surprising indeed.> 33S299-300

File: 33S1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:28:42 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-25113
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-25113


1776

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Col. John Floyd to Col. William Preston, Boonesborough, 7/21/1776; 1: <The situation of our country is much altered since I wrote you last. The Indians seem determined to break up our settlement, & I really doubt unless it was possible to give us some assistance that the greatest part of the people must fall a prey to them. They have, I am satisfied, killed several which I, at this time, know not how to mention. Many are missing who some time ago went out about their business, who we can hear nothing of. Fresh sign of Indians is seen almost every day. I think I mentioned to you before of some damage they had done at Leesburg. <The seventh of this month they killed one Cooper on Licking creek; the fourteenth they killed a man whose name I dont know, at your salt spring on Licking creek. The same day they took out of a canoe, within sight of this place, Miss Betsey Callaway, her sister Frances, and a daughter of Daniel Boone's; the two last are about 13 or 14 years old, & the other grown. The affair happened late in the afternoon; they left the canoe on the opposite side of the river from us which prevented our getting over for some time to pursue them. We could not that night follow more than five miles before dark; next morning by day light we were on the tracks, but found they had totally prevented our following them, by walking some distance apart through the thickest cane they could find. We observed their course & on which side we had left their sign, & travelled upwards of thirty miles. We then imagined they would be less cautious in travelling, & made a turn in order to cross their trace; & had gone but a few miles till we found their tracks in a buffalo path, pursued & overtook them in going about ten miles, just as they were kindling a fire to cook. Our study had been more to get the prisoners without giving the Indians time to murder them after they discovered us, than to kill them. We discovered each other nearly at the same time; four of us fired, & all rushed on them, which prevented their carrying any thing away, except one shot gun without any amunition. Mr. Boone & myself had each a pretty fair shoot, just as they began to move off: I am well convinced I shot one through, & the one he shot dropped his gun, mine had none. The place was very thick with cane, & being so much eleated on recovering the three poor little heart-broken girls prevented our making any further search. We sent them off almost naked, some without their mockisons, & no one of them so much as a knife or tomahawk.> continued

File: 33S1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:29:59 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-25114
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-25114


1776

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
Col. John Floyd to Col. William Preston, Boonesborough, 7/21/1776; 2: <After the girls came to themselves enough to speak, they told us there were only five Indians, four Shawanees & one Cherokee; could all speak good English. They said they should take them to the Shawanee Towns: and the war club we got was like those I've seen from that nation. Several words of their language which they retained was knwon to be Shawanee. They also told them the Cherokees had killed and drove all the people from Watago & thereabouts; & that fourteen Cherokees were then on the Kentucky, waiting to do mischief. If the war becomes general, which there is now the greatest appearance of, our situation is truly alarming. We are baout finishing a large fort, and intend to try to keep possession of this place as long as possible. They are, I understand, doing the same at Harrodsburg, & also on Elkhorn at the Royal Spring. A settlement on Licking, known by the name of Hinkston's is broken up, nineteen of which are now here on their way in, himself among the rest, who all seem deaf to any thing we can say to dissuade them; ten at least, I understand, of our own people are going to join them, which will leave us with less than 30 men at this fort. I think more than 300 men have left the country since I came out, & not one has arrived except a few cabiners down the Ohio. <I want as much to return as any person can do, but if I leave the country now, there is scarcely one single man hereabouts but what will follow the example. When I think of the deplorable condition a few helpless families are likely to be in, I conclude to sell my life as dear as I can in their defence rather than to make an ignominious escape. <I am afraid it is in vain to sue for any relief from Virginia; yet the Convention encouraged the settlement of this country, and why should not the extreme parts of Fincastle be as justly entitled to protection as any other part of the colony. An expedition being carried on against those nations who are at open war with the people in general, might in a great measure relieve us, by drawing them off to defend their towns. <If any thing under Heaven can be done for us, I know of no person who would more willingly engage in forwarding us in assistance than yourself. I do at the request and in behalf of all the distressed women, children & other inhabitants of this place, implore the aid of every leading man who may have it in his power to give them any relief.> 33S300-305

File: 33S1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:30:57 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-25115
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-25115


1780

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Col. John Floyd to Col. William Preston, Harrodsburg, 2/20/1780: Hard Winter of 79-80; Floyd had just come to KY with his new family <Notwithstanding the severest winter that ever was known, I have only lost one cow, & she died since the warm weather: I lost two horses, but they strayed away last December; but poor Bob died about three weeks ago, after all I could do. He got frost bitten in camp before I could get him a cabin, & was reduced to a mere skeleton. I have no bread yet, but expect a small supply from my friend Col. Henderson at Boonesborough, who has greatly befriended me by sparing that which he may want himself, & only waits for high water to send it down with his own, on the way to the mouth of Green river where he is about to form a settlement. I shall not be able to do much surveying this spring, as the hard winter & the loss of my negro have prevented my getting one acre cleared on my place. We have but ten families with us yet, but I expect about fifteen in the whole, which I think will make us tolerably safe.> 33S316-18

File: 33S1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:32:10 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-25116
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-25116


1780

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Col. John Floyd to Col. William Preston, [6/1780]: <The savages have done no damage on this creek for some weeks past, but have frequently visited other parts of the country. Col. Slaughter has demanded 1400 militia from this country to go against the Towns, & to rendezvous at the Big Bone by the middle of July; but I doubt the men cannot be Col. Bowman, as such numbers are daily flocking to the interior parts of the country. . . . People [in] this [country] seem generally to have lost their health, but perhaps it is owning to the disagreeable way in which we are obliged to live crowded in forts, where the air seems to have lost all its purity & sweetness. Our poor little Billy has been exceedingly ill for several weeks & is reduced to a mere skelteton by a kind of flux which is common here & of which numbers die: His mother is almost disconsolate, & I myself am much afraid we shall lose the child; & if we do, I shall impute it to nothing but iving in dirt and filth.> 33S318-319

File: 33S1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:33:51 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-25117
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-25117


1780

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Thomas Hart to Nathaniel Hart, Grayfields NC, 8/3/1780: <I observe what you say respecting our losses by Daniel Boone. I had heard of the misfortune soon after it happened, but not of my being a partaker before now. I feel for the poor people who, perhaps, are to lose even their pre-emptions by it; but I must say I feel more for poor Boone whose character I am told suffers by it. Much degerated must the people of this age be, when amongst them are to be found men to censure & blast the character & reputation of a person so just and upright, and in whose breast is a seat of virtue too pure to admit of a thought so base and dishonorable. I have known Boone in times of old, when poverty and distress had him fast by the hand, & in these wretched circumstances I ever found him of a noble and generous soul, despising every thing mean; & therefore, I will freely grant him a discarge for whatever sums of mine he may have been possessed of at the time.> 33S324-325

File: 33S1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:35:28 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-25118
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-25118


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Nathaniel Hart [Jr.], son of Nathaniel Hart [Sr.]; Woodford county KY, no date: <When captured by Tarlton, appearing in his hunting shirt, & not suspecting his charcter, & seeing him sauntering carelessly about, was asked who he was? "A Virginia burgess from Kentucky," was Boone's reply; & his personal appearance & apparent careless indifference, led them to think him not more than halfwitted. They now attempted to alram his fears; but he very flatly told them, it made no odds to him -- he would go where he pleased. That night he escaped.> 33S337

File: 33S1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:36:42 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-25119
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-25119


1834

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Statement of Pleasant Henderson, brother of Richard Henderson, ca. 1834: <In the year 1774, my brother Richard Henderson (being induced to attempt a purchase of that country from the Cherokee Indians, through the suggestions & advice of the late Col. Daniel Boone, who then resided in Rowan county, North Carolina, & who had hunted in & explored it as early as '68 or 9) formed a company for the purpose of purchasing it, consisting of Richard Henderson aforesaid, & John Williams of Granville county, William Johnston, Thomas Hart, James Hogg, John Luttrell, & Nathaniel Hart of Orange county, whole sharers, & Leonard Hendly Bullock of Granville county, & David Hart of Orange half sharers -- making eight shares. I then resided with my brother Richard, & became personally acquainted with every member of the company. <In consequence, my brother went in the fall of the same year, 1774, to the Cherokee nation, to acertain if they would sell that country; they assented, & the price agreed on; & agreed to meet the company in March or February following in Treaty at Sycamore Shoals on the Wataga river, a branch of the Holston, now in the state of Tennessee. A celebrated chief called the Little Carpenter, a young Indian man & an Indian woman came with my brother on his return home, for the purpose of seeing & examining goods for which the purchase was made. <At the time & place aforesaid the Indians attended, 1200, it was said, in number, & the Treaty was concluded, the goods in payment delivered. This treaty took place in month of February, 1775. <In consequence Colonel Boone aforesaid, who was present & waiting the result of the Treaty, immediately, at the request of the company, went forward with a company making the rout, as he was previously acquainted with it from the circumstance of his having travelled it several times, & took possession on the western bank of the Kentucky river, (the northern boundary of the purchase, from its junction with the Ohio to its source) a little below the mouth of Otter creek, & commenced building a few houses. On the 20th of April my brother Richard arrived & took formal possession on behalf of the company of the purchase, under the old custom of "livery & leesen." The Indians having in conclusion of the Treaty appointed John Farrar, a cotemporary [sic] and acquaintance of mine, to perform the duty. The settlement of fort afterwards built was called Boonesborough, & the spot to this day retains its name.> 33S362-64

File: 33S1.DR1



    Created: 7/12/2017 5:38:03 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-25120
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-25120


1851-12-06

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with William M. Kenton, only surviving son of Simon Kenton, White county IN, 12/6/1851: Paint Creek Town expedition: Kenton and the other maurauders hid in a brush fence covered with pumpkin vines, so near to the Indian cabins that the Indian children came into the cornfield and passed within their reach. One of Kenton's companions wanted to kill some of them and take their scalps, but Kenton objected, saying they had come to reconnoiter the town and see if it could be attacked not to kill children, which would defeat their object. They then "returned to Boone's camp to report their discoveries," so DB probably not with Kenton at this moment. On the way back, a distance from the town, Kenton heard a horse bell, squatted down, and soon discovered an Indian approaching on horseback without a bridle; then another Indian running up behind, jumped up on the back of the horse, surprising the rider; both laughed. <Kenton drew up, and without really thinking what he was doing, or really intending to do it, fired and shot the front one off the horse, and both rolled off together, one mortally wounded with two balls through the body, and one ball went on through the other Indian's side and the other through his wrist; Kenton ran up and attempted to scalp the one wounded in the arm, when the other gave a struggle and kicked Kenton, who thinking othere Indians had come up, ran off, leaving his gun, and reported to Boone that he had killed two Indians and others were jumping on him. WMK recollects seeing this wounded Indian frequently visiting Gen. Kenton at Urbana during or soon after the war of 1812, who would quiz or joke Gen. K. about running away from a dead Indian. 5S102-104

File: 5S1.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 9:39:09 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27859
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27859


1851-12-06

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with William M. Kenton, only surviving son of Simon Kenton, White county IN, 12/6/1851: With Montgomery and Clark, Kenton went to make "reprisals of horses -- nearly all in Ky had been carried off by the Indians." At Old Town (at mouth of Massie's Creek above Xenia, Ohio -- Old Chillicothe) they took a "gang of horses," and got them safely to the Ohio above the mouth of the Little Miami. But because of high and rough water, could not get the horses to cross; waited a day or two, cautious about Indians, but when they did not come, stopped worrying about them. Then suddenly a party of 8-10 came upon them, killed Montgomery, [Clark got away], captured Kenton. Tied him upon the back of an unbroken colt; at Chillicothe had to run the gauntlet, was knocked down and severely beaten; sentenced to be burnt at Wapatonica, a general burning place for Shawnee prisoners; Blue Jacket one of his captors (in later years used to visit Kenton near Springfield); Girty appeared with a war party and captive woman and children from Monongahela, got Kenton released. Indians <washed him up [he had been blackened in preparation for burning], gve him moccasins; and wanted him to appear cheerful, as he looked to morose & dejected to suit the Indians since they had resolved on sparing him.> He with Girty; asked Girty if it did not hurt him, going in to their old neighborhoods to raid [they had both known the Kennedy family, the father of whom Girty's party had killed, and the wife and children brought in]; Girty thought and then said: "They were only Scotch-Irish." After this Kenton again condemned to be burned by a returning war party that complained Girty had too much influence; was tied down, tortured by a squaw who beat him and broke his arm; taken to Detroit, from where he escaped. 5S104-112

File: 5S1.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 9:39:51 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27860
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27860


1851-12-06

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
People
None.
Interview with William M. Kenton, only surviving son of Simon Kenton, White county IN, 12/6/1851: Kenton visited DB in about 1809; reached DB's just before evening. <As he entered the house, he was an armful of wood outside of the door. He made himself known to Mrs. Boone; in a few minutes another load of wood was thrown down outside the door, & Mrs. B. called out "Daniel, there's a gentleman here wishes to see you." No reply was made -- soon another and another turn of wood was brought up for the evening fire -- each time Mrs. B. calling upon him, but he making no reply. When he had got up the desired quantity of wood, he made his appearance, & when he discovered his old friend, he kindly reproached his good wife for not telling him who had come, for he supposed it was some neighbor.> Was there for about a week, and had a "happy visit." 5S125

File: 5S1.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 9:40:23 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27861
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27861


1851-12-06

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with William M. Kenton, only surviving son of Simon Kenton, White county IN, 12/6/1851: Kenton met DB first time at the Blue Licks in 1775. 5S101

File: 5S1.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 9:41:05 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27862
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27862


1851-12-06

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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People
None.
Interview with William M. Kenton, only surviving son of Simon Kenton, White county IN, 12/6/1851: Kenton was so angry when McGary killed Moluntha that he came near to killing him. When the wounded Indian [Big Jim?] shot two men, Kenton rushed up, seized and killed him before he had time to reload again. 5S118

File: 5S1.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 9:41:33 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27863
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27863


1851-12-19

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with John and Sarah Kenton McCord, Urbana OH, 12/19/1851: Visited DB in MO in 1809. He reached DB's house one evening. <Boone was out some distance skinning a buck. Kenton asked Mrs. Boone for entertainment for the night. Mrs. Boone said they had no spare beds and could not keep him. "Why not? You had better let me stay," continued Kenton. "No, nothing for you to sleep on." "I think," added Kenton, "you would if you knew who I am." Mrs. Boone now stepped to the door of the cabin where some of the lingering rays of light yet stole in, to get a good look at the stranger; but she said she did not recognize him. "Would you know Simon Butler?" "Yes, but you are not him." "Yes, I am!" & smiled, & this smile caused her to recognize his olf familiar features; she threw away her pipe which she was smoking, & clasped him in her arms & made so much noise in expressing her joy as to attract Col. Boone's attention, who came in to see the cause. He was quickly told that Simon Butler was before him, when he, too became joyously excited. All three sat up all night, rehearsing the story of the olden time & the varied fortunes of their ancient companions in the early settlement of Kentucky -- together with their own individual changes & vicissitudes.> When he as about to leave, Kenton gave DB several fine blankets and some money. 5S172

File: 5S1.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 9:43:07 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27864
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27864


1851-12-19

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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People
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Interview with John and Sarah Kenton McCord, Urbana OH, 12/19/1851: 1775, Kenton sees man at the Blue Licks; thinks an Indian, about to shoot, second thoughts, turned out to be Michael Stoner; Kenton asked him where he was from: "Schpoon's Fort," "Taniel Schpoon's Fort." This was the first time Kenton learned about Boone's settlement on the Kentucky river, his first knowledge of other settlers in Kentucky. He then went and met Boone. 5S143

File: 5S1.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 9:44:15 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27865
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27865


1851-12-19

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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People
None.
Interview with John and Sarah Kenton McCord, Urbana OH, 12/19/1851: 1777 fight. 14 men in the fort, 28 without; Indians intercepted these men, had a fight. DB shot through the leg and an Indian with his uplifted tomahawk had him astraddle when Kenton shot him dead. Another warrior coming up close with his knife in hand to take DB's scalp; not having time to reload, Kenton rushed up, clubbed and killed him with the breech of his gun. Killed another during the fight -- making three to his credit, <but had not time to scalp either.> Kenton picked up DB and carried him into the fort; some Indians actually pulled at DB and tried to take him from Kenton. In the fort, after DB's wound dressed, sent for Kenton and said: "Simon, you have behaved like a man today," adding nothing more; then he gave Kenton his first commission, a small affair, an ensign. 5S145

File: 5S1.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 9:44:44 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27866
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27866


1851-12-19

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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People
None.
Interview with John and Sarah Kenton McCord, Urbana OH, 12/19/1851: During Kenton's captivity, after running the gauntlet, laying on the ground badly beaten, Blackfish came up to him: "You'll steal horses again?" Then BF asked him if DB had sent him? Kenton: "NO!" (According to Sarah Kenton McCord, when Kenton was read McClung's account of this, with Kenton replying to BF, "No, sir," Kenton angrily responded that <he had never said "sir" to any Indian, and never said it to a white man either.>) BF asked him about Kentucky, number of people and soldiers there; Kenton said he did not know; named, however, a large number of the officers, in order to convey the idea of great strength at the forts. 5S15

File: 5S1.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 9:45:27 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27867
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27867


1851-12-19

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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People
None.
Interview with John and Sarah Kenton McCord, Urbana OH, 12/19/1851: While in captivity, Kenton witnessed a good deal of violence. Saw two women and a child brought in; the older woman was "mad;" kept fighting her Indian captors, throwing stones, coals, once even a steaming pot of hominey; the Indians admired her spirit, and left her alone. Her daughter-in-law, however, kept crying; Indians told her to stop or they would give her something to cry about. Finally they took her little child and impailed it on a stick through the bowles, and let it slowly die in agony in front of her; eventually tomahawked it to death; the woman kept up her crying and was eventually herself tomahawked to death. 5S155

File: 5S1.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 9:46:04 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27868
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27868


1851-12-19

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with John and Sarah Kenton McCord, Urbana OH, 12/19/1851: Tells essentially the same story of his captivity. Says the Indian who captured him was named Bo-nah. Indian shot at him, Kenton jumped aside; the Indian advanced because Kenton could not get his gun to fire; Indian upon him, said: "How d'do, brother?" Kenton, muttering: "If my gun would go off, I'd brother you to your heart's content." They take him prisoner, tie his arms to a pole across his breast. Black Hoof came up, said to Kenton: "Hell, damn you, you know how to jump now!" Bo-nah [William Kenton tells this too] used to visit Kenton afterwards in Ohio, begging clothing and other articles. Once Kenton said to him, why should he continue to give things to his former captor who whipped him; because, Bo-nah replied, "I did not kill or starve you." Once, Bo-nah, sitting at table with Kenton and Sarah, said: "I and Cuttahotha [Kenton] are now on better terms than we were the day I made him extend his arms and tied him, when Cuttahotha cried -- now I am sitting with him at his table in friendship." Kenton, carving a roast, thrust at Bo-han with his knife and nearly slashed him; Bo-nah left and died soon thereafter. This about 1803. 5S145-47

File: 5S1.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 9:46:38 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27869
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27869


1851-12-19

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with John and Sarah Kenton McCord, Urbana OH, 12/19/1851: Kenton had great regard and affection for many Indians. Particularly one, Chiuxko, whom he had fought on the Little Miami in Ohio. <Chiuxko was a very witty, playful, jovial Indian, and would keep a whole company in laughter by his drolleries, and pretending in his inimitably ludicrous way, to make love to the girls and women. He was middle aged, or something more, but a common warrior, though one of distinction, and very active and athletic.> 5S171

File: 5S1.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 9:47:06 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27870
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27870


1851-12-19

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with John and Sarah Kenton McCord, Urbana OH, 12/19/1851: When Kenton arrived at Detroit his long black hair was so matted that a comb could not possibly be run through it, so the British cut it off. 5S155

File: 5S1.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 9:47:35 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27871
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27871


1851-12-19

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with John and Sarah Kenton McCord, Urbana OH, 12/19/1851: In this interview, Sarah also related the story of Kenton shooting the two Indians with one shot on the Paint Creek Town expedition, essentially the same story. But she said she had no recollection of this wounded Indian afterwards visiting her father in Ohio. LCD notes: <A want of knowledge or recollection on the part of one, should not have weight against the positive recollection of another, when the latter is equally credible.> Interesting. 5S145

File: 5S1.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 9:48:03 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27872
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27872


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851; 1: Jemima had urged the Callaway girls to come with her in the boat so she could dangle her injured foot in the cool water; said she was afraid of the "yellow boys." When the Indians attacked, so said Jemima to her brother, it was the Callaway girls who fought back. All screamed, and the Indians hurried them off. Because of Jemima's injured foot, she fell down, sometimes accidentally, sometimes purposefully in order to slow the march. Would frequently scream in mock pain, hoping to raise the alarm. The Indians shook their tomahawks at her. Hanging-Maw, a Cherokee, was one of the party, known to Jemima from their time on Watauga. He conversed with her in broken English: Are these your sisters; Yes, thinking he would be more likely to spare the children of his old friend Boone. <We have done pretty well for Old Boone this time.> 6S95-96 continued

File: 6S2.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:33:57 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27901
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27901


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851; 2: DB heard the screams while he was taking his Sunday nap; jumped up and seized his gun, ran off without his moccasins. Olive certain he wore none until after the resuce when he took a pair from the Indians' packs. Before the rescue they came upon a buffalo that the Indians had butchered; DB said the Indians would stop to cook at the first water. Found a writhing snake the Indians had killed. The pursuerers divided; DB's half only gone another 200 yards when they saw the Indians encamped on a small branch on the down side of a small glen. The girls sitting on the grass, guarded by a reclining Indian; the others kindling a fire, gathering wood, preparing for cooking; the guard left his post to light his pipe at the fire (so Jemima always stated), he just reaching the fire when the first shot rang out. At the report, the girls jumped up, Jemima exclaiming: "That's Daddy!" Started toward the rescuers, DB cried out for them to throw themselves flat; DB did not know how many Indians in the party. The girls did so. The girls had given up hope of rescue that day. 6S96-101

File: 6S2.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:34:28 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27902
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27902


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: DB always talked of these three attacks on the fort: the first beginning 4/24/1777, in which he was wounded in the ankle, lasting 2 days; the second beginning 5/23/1777 lasting 3 days; and the third, of 9/1778, lasting 9 days. 6S102

File: 6S2.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:35:01 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27903
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27903


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Nathan attended school in Lexington for some 18 months in ca 1793-94 when the family lived on the Kanhawa. 6S103

File: 6S2.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:35:28 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27904
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27904


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851; 1: DB out hunting to provision the saltmakers; snowing quite heavily; discovered a party of Indians on his trail, snow an inch deep, so he was easily followed; attempted to untie and throw off the load, but failed as the fresh buffalo strings (cut from the butchered animal) holding perhaps 300-400 pounds of meat were frozen; attempted to dray his knife to cut the tugs, but he had put it in its sheath greasy and bloody, and it was frozen in place; Indians were now very close; DB darted off on foot; after half a mile Indians were closing, fired at him; bullets struck on either side of him, knocking up the snow, DB thought as warning; another shot cut the strap of his powder horn loose; concluding it was impossible to escape, and tiring, he dodged behind a tree, placing his gun before it as a gisn of surrender. Indians came up whooping and laughing; took his weapons. No conversation with DB, took him about 3 miles to their camp; large number of Indians and several Frenchmen, two of whom were officers; among them Black Fish, Captain Will, Pompey, Laramie, Baubee. Pompey the interpreter. 6S105-06 continued

File: 6S2.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:35:53 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27905
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27905


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851; 2: Taken to Black Fish's camp; DB greeted Captain Will: "Howdy do, Capt. Will?" Where did we meet before, asked Will. DB: Do you not recollect taking two men prisoners eight years ago on Kentucky river? Will then recognized DB and renewed the shaking of hands with great cordiality & several others now came up as familiarly as though they had also previous known him <and a most ludicrous scene of hand-shaking & mock friendship ensued with all apparent sincerity & gravity on the part of these forest stoics which Boone bore with all the grace and politeness of which he was master.> Through Pompey, Black Fish asked whose men those were at Pe-me-mo Lick? DB: how do you know there are men there? BF: our spies told us. DB: my men. BF: we go there to kill them. DB then proposed that if they would not mistreat his men, nor make them run the gauntlet, he would surrender them up as prisoners of war. <Boone was influenced thus to act knowing, s there were several inches of snow upon the ground, & the enemy four times the number of the saltboilers, the latter, ignorant of their discovery, would find it impossible to escape; & the next day, when the Indians proposed going there, being Sunday, they would be loitering about & off their guard -- & moreover it being mid-winter, they would not be dreaming of an Indian in the country.> As to the possibility of an attack on Boonesborough, Nathan believes that nothing was said of it, but that DB infered that it was possible, and this would divert the Shanwees from that goal. 6S106-107 continued

File: 6S2.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:36:18 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27906
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27906


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851; 3: The next day, the Indians took him to the Lick, and he appeared on the hill on the south side of Licking directly opposite the salt spring and called to his men (who were lying about on their blankets sunning themselves); told them they were surrounded by a large party of Shawnees, that he had arranged for their surrender in exchange for a promise of good treatment, was impossible to get away, resistance useless. They at once yielded, and Indians came in from every side to take them. Nathan has no recollection of any council here or elsewhere. At the first camp, DB saw the Indians clearing a ground as if for a gauntlet; asked Black Fish, who replied [through Pompey]: "Oh Capt. Boone, this is not intended for your men, but for you yourself -- your men are prisoners by capitulation, & are exempted, but you are a prisoner of war, & made no such stipulation for yourself." DB could choose whether to run there or wait until they reached the Shawnee towns, where he would run between the women and children. <Boone said if he must run it, he should prefer to do so there, in the presence of men and warriors, & not before mere women and children.> The Indians formed the line with sticks, clubs, and tomahawks in hand; they made motions as if to spill his brains as he ran, <but seemed to favor him -- he only receiving a few slight strokes from switches.> Nathan recalled hearing that <something occured which created a laugh among the Indians & thinks it was . . . that DB ran in such a zigzag way, they cd. not well strike him, -- and that he ran over & knocked down one fellow who had placed himself in the course partly within the lines, the better to get a blow at the runner.> 6S107-110,128 continued

File: 6S2.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:36:39 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27907
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27907


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851; 4: That same evening a dispute arose over whether the prisoners ears should be trimmed (that is, split along the rim some 2 inches, so that, when healed, they could display bobs, etc.) Two French officers got into a dispute about it, one favoroing the other opposing; finally they drew their swords, but Black Fish intervened and prevented bloodshed. Nathan thinks this was the only dispute about how to treat the prisoners. Thinks Jackson misunderstood the dispute. The march to the Shawnee towns was marked by great hunger. DB told Nathan of eating slippery elm bark & oak ooze. No recollection of the men running the gauntlet when arriving at the towns. DB to Detroit, where Hamilton offered to ransom him, but Black Fish would not part with DB. Hamilton asked DB if he had heard anything of Burgoyne's army? DB: Yes, it was well known in KY that the whole army had surrendered to General Gates. Hamilton called to his private secretary, John Hay: "Hay, the report of Burgoyne's disaster I fear is too true; Capt. Boone says it was well known in Kentucky before he was taken." Hamilton requested DB not to mention it to the Indians; "You are too late, Governor, I have already told them of it." Hamilton: please belittle the report, as if of little consequence. Requested the commissary to furnish DB with a horse, saddle, bridle, and blanket and with a quantity of silver trinkets to use among the Shawnees as currency. Nathan <thinks it very likely DB used some POLICY with Hamilton; but no knowledge of exhibiting his Dunmore commission.> 6S110-114 continued

File: 6S2.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:37:08 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27908
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27908


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851; 5: From Detroit Black Fish took DB down Huron River to visit the Mingoes; to the head of Scioto and down to the other towns, giving them all notice to assemble for the grand expedition against KY. When they returned Andrew Johnson (Pe-cu-la, the Little Duck) had escaped. He was soon back with a party, attacking several Shawnee sugar camps. Blackfish asked DB who could have attacked the camps, and DB, as much to annoy as anything, told him it had to be Pecula, who was no fool but a fine woodsman. BF: why did you not tell me so before? DB: because you never asked me. This attack greatly concerned the Shawnees, because it demonstrated that the location of their towns were now known in Kentucky. <"The worst act the Indians ever did," Boone used to say, "was their taking the salt boilers, & learning them the way to their towns & the geography of the Indians country -- & that then it resulted in a real good to the Kentuckians, though at first they deemed it so great a disaster."> 6S115-116,122 continued

File: 6S2.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:37:33 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27909
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27909


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851; 6: Black Fish sent DB to fell a tree and make a trough in which to salt horses; DB returned with blistered hands; showed them to Black Fish and said to his adopted father: you are making me a slave, you don't treat me like a son; men, warriors, hunters dont perform such menial service; in Kentucky I had slaves to do such work. Black Fish said it was true, and he would no longer have to work. Black Fish and his wife treated DB very kindly; seemed to think much of him, and he of them. Two daughters, Pommepesy (4-5 yrs) and Pimmepesy (1 yr old), the first ill-tempered and hateful, the other of kind temper. DB used to nurse the baby frequently; would buy maple sugar with his trinkets and give it to his sisters and other children, who called it "molas." Many a lump of sugar Black Fish would suck, then take it our and give it to DB -- this DB told Nathan, was a measure of how much he loved DB. Named him Shel-tow-ee, meaning The Big Turtle. [Olive Boone suggested that this name had already been given, when not clear; that when DB introduced himself to Captain Will after his capture, he said, "Don't you remember me, Big Turtle?"] Always adressed DB as "my son." 6S117-119,127 continued

File: 6S2.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:38:01 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27910
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27910


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851; 7: Spring, grass getting up nicely, Black Fish gave DB permission to hopple and turn out his pony [given by Hamilton] in the prairie. DB found he was being watched, but pretended not to notice, went off whistling. He was thus watched several times, but finally allowed to go off on his own. He feigned less skill in shooting at marks, letting the Indians beat him. Eventually he was permitted to hunt alone. <He might have effected his escape much sooner than he did, but as he had learned of the large Boonesborough expedition, he delayed till he could learn more definitely concerning it & the time of its marching.> DB often aided his Shawnee mother in hoeing corn, but Black Fish one time seeing this said: "My son, you need not work; your mother can easily raise enough for us all." William Hancock, another prisoner, a poor woodsman, and very moody and discontented with his captivity, later told Nathan he could not see how Boone could be whistling & contented among the dirty Indians while he was so melancholy. 6S119-122 continued

File: 6S2.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:38:24 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27911
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27911


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851; 8: At length Black Fish and family took DB to the Scioto Licks and saltworks to make salt for a few days. This was probably at the Paint Creek town, where Jimmy Rogers, a white prisoner who never left the Shawnees, lived. He finally went with the Shawnees to MO where some of his Indians children were educated; DB often visited there, as well as the other Shawnees in MO. At this time he got DB to stock a gun for him. Another Indian gave him a barrel to stock; DB had already secreted some power and ball for his intended escape. On the way back to Chillicothe from this trip, at dusk, the Indians scared up a flock of turkies, & chased some distance after them; while thus busily engaged, leaving DB with the squaws and horses, DB concluded to take that moment to flee. He cut the ropes and threw off the load of brass kettles, his Shawnee mother asking what he was doing. Going to see his wife. He must no do so, for Black Fish would be angry. He mounted his poney and laid on the whip, as the squaws raised a loud hallooing to give the alarm. He was soon beyond hearing. 6S122-123

File: 6S2.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:38:49 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27912
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27912


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851; 9: DB rode all night until about 10 the next morning when the pony gave out. Then went on foot as quickly as possible. That day crossed the Ohio. After crossing, and drying, wrapped himself in his blanket and slept. Awakened by something seizing his toes, thought had been recaptured, by was a wolf or fox. His feet were scalded, he peeled some oak bark, "jamed up" and made some ooze, with which he treated himself and proceeded. He killed a buffalo with his newly stocked gun, cooked and ate a delicious meal, cut out the tongue as a present for his son Daniel Morgan. 6S123-126

File: 6S2.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:39:07 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27913
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27913


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851; 10: Olive remembered DB saying <he used duplicity -- had promised to surrender Boonesboro & remove out the people to the British & Indian country; & thus when hoeing corn with his Indian mother, Black Fish said -- "You need not hoe corn, your mother can easily make enough both for my family & yours also when they come out.> 6S128

File: 6S2.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:39:37 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27914
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27914


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851; 11: Olive said that DB <was much disappointed to learn his family had gone to Carolna. Went to his old house -- & found hi family cat had deserted it from the time when Mrs. Boone left -- within half an hour after Col. Boone's return, came & fodnled around & jumped into his lap.> 6S140

File: 6S2.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:40:01 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27915
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27915


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Nathan said <he feels confident Filson has taken many liberties, & made not a few misrepresentations in the narrative, either purposely or unintentionally -- & he thinks there frequecy can only be explained by supposing that his father narrated his Ky adventures to Filson who wrote them down from memory at some subsequent period. Much of the language is none of Boone's.> 6S128-29


File: 6S2.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:40:38 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27916
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27916


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: DB often visited his Shawnee friends in MO, among the Jimmy Rogers, the white captive who remained with them all his life. These Shawnees were not the ones who settled near New Madrid, unless they had emigrated from there. Finally the remnant of this band went, after several removes, to the Kansas River. Rogers told him in MO that when he heard of DB's escape from the Shawnees he was "sure Boone would go as straight as a leather string home." 6S124

File: 6S2.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:41:04 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27917
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27917


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Samuel Brooks and James Callaway escaped from Detroit, but were recaptured when they lost their way in a fog and found themselves in the midst of an Indian town. They were made to run a gauntlet of women and children, which DB always maintained was much crueler than a gauntlet of warriors. Brooks was badly hurt (his arm broken) because he was so irrascible that he stood and fought each person who took a swing at him. Later he and Callaway were discovered making another plan for escape; Callaway was hard of hearing, and Brooks was very loudly talking to him of the escape, when overheard. Brooks died in captivity. DB believed that he would have survived but for his irrascible conduct. 6S116-117

File: 6S2.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:41:32 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27918
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27918


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Nathan said that the first DB knew of Kenton was his arriving at Boonesborough where he lived a year or so with DB's family, under the name of Simon Butler. Kenton visited DB in MO during the spring or summer of ca 1805 or '06, spent a week at Nathan's, where DB was residing in a small house almost adjoining in the same yard, & the two enjoyed each other's company, recounting their old KY troubles & hardships. 6S93

File: 6S2.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:42:10 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27919
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27919


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Turkies very poor in the summer because of ticks, but good eating in the other seasons; buffalo best in the fall, as was the deer and elk. There were no bees in KY when DB arrived; and none in the woods of MO until after settlements expanded. 6S92

File: 6S2.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:42:39 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27920
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27920


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
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None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: DB told Nathan he was employed by Henderson to collect the Indians for the treaty; and provided the geographical information for the purchase. Was also to mark out the road to KY. For his service DB was to have a certain portion of the purchase. DB did all he was supposed to, but never received his land because of the failure of the Transylvania company to maintain their claim. <DB troubled himself no further about it.> 6S87-88

File: 6S2.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:43:15 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27921
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27921


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Michael Stoner, Nathan said, was an awkward Dutchman, a low, chunky man who became a good woodsman. Was truthful and reliable. In later years he hunting much in MO, and stayed often at Nathan's house. <Once an old neighbor of Stoner's in KY came to Boone's, & said to Stoner (a RUSE to get him off home) that it was understood in Ky that he was dead, & his wife was engaged to be married again not far distant: next morning Michael Stoner packed off for Kentucky. 6S85

File: 6S2.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:43:58 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27922
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27922


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: DB's writing was improved by lessons from William Hays, who kept Boone's accounts for a while on Clinch. 6S90


File: 6S2.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:44:34 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27923
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27923


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Olive Boone told the story of Tate, as recounted in Draper's Life of Boone. 6S84

File: 6S2.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:45:14 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27924
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27924


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851; 3: <Gen Green Clay, wrote to Col. Daniel Boone, May 4th 1806, from Madison county Ky, (who says he was then a Maj. Gen. of the Militia -- Judge of Madison county court -- Senator in the Legislature, & one of the Governor's Privy Council, &c): Mentions having recd. by Capt. John Sappington Col. Boone's letter respecting the two claims entered in the name of Robert Clark Jacob -- one near the Blue Licks; the other on the waters of Big Bone -- (about which, says Col. N. Boone, Gen. Clay had written to Col. Dl. Boone, & to which this letter sent by Sappington was a reply) -- & takes the liberty to trouble him again on the same subject -- & hopes it will not be offensive to Col. Boone for him (Gen. Clay) to make further inquiry -- & adds: "You & your old lady (who I hope is well) are both old & in a new country where there will of course be many hardships to encounter, & could you believe that you are able to travel back to Kentucky, & will come & shew the lines, or the corners, or one or two corners & lines of Jacob's two claims, or either of them, I will provide for the support of yourself and your lady all your lives afterwards: and a handsome legacy to leave to your children. I will either let you have negroes, or stock, or cash, whichever will be your choice to accept, & which you may think will be agreeable to you two. . . . I know you were very ill treated by many persons for whom you did business, & I also know the great difficulties you labored under, & the great distress you suffered by doing business for people who gave you no thanks for your trouble -- nor even paid you your just due. These people ought to suffer. I have but a small part in these two tracts of land, & I would willingly divide my interest with you, to come at my right." But Col. Boone would not consent to go -- said that when he left Kentucky, he did it with the intention of never stepping his feet upon Kentucky soil again; & if he was compelled to lose his head on the block, or revisit Kentucky, he would not hesitate to choose the former.> 6S219-21

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:49:29 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27925
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27925


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851; 2: <About the period when he settled at Limestone, & shortly before the commencement of the land litigations of Kentucky, he thought himself worth a fortune in the wild lands of the country -- possessed considerable other property, was thriving & prosperous. Little by little, his wealth melted away before these constantly coming claims for damages, & when he finally left Kentucky in 1799 he was poor. While he still had claims to well nigh one hundred thousand acres, the most of it was also claimed by others -- he resolved he would never contest their right -- go & leave it all; & advised his children who might survive him never to contest these claims -- that the suits, even if successful, would cost more thime, money & vexation than they would be worth. He never after looked after or inquired about his claims which others contested. He had one large [half] claim of ten thousand acres. It was located on Licking, on the northern or eastern bank, at the old Indian trail crossing Licking some 8 miles below the Lower Blue Licks. It was in a broken & rather poor country, & located in 1782 -- & hence it was not shingled over by other entries. This tract he conveyed to his nephew, Col. John Grant, to sell or deed by piece-meal to those who might present honest claims againt Col. Boone, to adjust which he felt a strong anxiety: How Col. Grant, in whom he fully confided, disposed of it, Col. Boone never troubled himself to enquire; but this tract probably liquidated not a few claims. In not a few instances, his testimony in land cases so displeased & enraged those who had lost their claims in the litigation, that they would threaten Col. Boone's life; & he said he could not travel with safety -- that with him even in time of peace his own Kentucky was as dangerous to him as in time of Indian dangers, with the addition of premeditated personal injury, he being alone singled out for assassination. He said he thought he had been badly treated -- thought he had fought as hard & long for Kentucky as any other person; but he would rather be poor than retain an acre of land or a farthing in money, so long as claims & debts hung over him.> 6S217-219 continued

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:50:01 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27926
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27926


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851; 1: <Let some of the causes of Boone's leaving Kentucky be noted: Some few of his land locations that were made early, the titles were mostly good: these he principally sold, at low prices, & with the proceeds purchased land warrants, & made new entries. Some lands which he sold for a trifle & others which he had even given away, were subsequently supplanted by other titles; & he compelled to pay damages -- many times more than the price he sold them for, when he sold at all. He gave away considerable land -- gave to or exchanged a tract with Wm. Hays, & gave another to Jos Scholl, his sons-in-law, near Boone's Station. He early sold a splended tract of one thousand acres, lying between the head of Elkhorn & Boone;s Station, to Gilbert Imlay, & took his bond for L1000 -- Imlay disposed of the tract to others, & went to England & died there, & Boone lost the whole. At Limestone he became security for Capt. Ebenezer's Platt for L500 -- had it to pay, & never got but a moiety of it -- (And yet Col. Boone was so confiding, that he loaned to this man, avowedly to go to Louisville on business, a negro, horse, saddle & bridle, & ne never heard of him but once afterwards, & then he was in New Orleans -- & never got his property or its worth again -- & this was the only negro boy Col. Boone then possessed. When he left Kentucky he had for years been troubled with making lost claims good -- or rather had to pay not the amount for which he sold them, but largely increased damages. He had, beside, been frequently called upon to attend courts, as a witness to establish some corner tree or survey -- & his testimony was often important; the discomfited party would sometimes ingenesously throw out intimations that Col. Boone had been bribed, had deviated from the truth, &c; & sensitive as he was, these things greatly annoyed him.> 6S215-17 continued

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:50:30 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27927
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27927


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851; 2: DMB returned from MO, took his nephew Philip Goe, Jr., and three black slaves back to MO, built a good house and commenced clearing the land; left the slaves and returned to KY, then visited his father in the spring of 1799. His report, along with the letter of Gov. Trudeau, convinced DB to make the remove. DB at once set about making preparations. He and Nathan found an unusually large poplar half a mile up Little Sandy just below the falls, felled it, commenced making a large pirogue five feet in diameter, 50-60 feet long, and spent much time completing it. They were not ready to start until the fall. 6S214-15

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:50:51 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27928
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27928


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851; 1: Daniel Morgan Boone, yet unmarried, went down the Ohio and Mississippi about the time that DB removed to Brushy Forks (1795), exploring and examining the country, and hunting and trapping. On the waters of Tombigbee. Not content with this country, he turned his attention to Missouri. Was there in the fall of 1797, accompanied by Col. James Smith (the old Indian captive) and Joseph Scholl, his brother-in-law. DB had already begun to think of this as a future home for his old age. He gave his son instructions to call on the Spanish governor and make inquiries on his behalf as to the quantity of land granted to new settlers, heads of families, children, servants, and also whether settlers were required "to embrace the Catholic religion." Smith and Scholl, not pleased with what they had seen, returned when they reached the Mississippi. DMB went on, explored the Femme Osage country; consulted with Gov. Trudeau, who seemed pleased with the idea of having DB settle in the country with a colony of emigrants. Trudeau wrote DB a letter (1/24/1798) expressing his pleasure at the prospect of DB's removing to Upper Louisiana; that he should have 1000 arpents of land for himself, and each family who came with him should be entitled to 600 arpents; that the religious requirement would not be enforced. 6S213-214 continued

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:51:23 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27929
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27929


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
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None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Nathan began his first place in the spring of 1798 when he decided to open an unimproved tract owned by his father located about half a mile above the mouth of Little Sandy on the southern bank of the Ohio. Went with his cousin Jonathan Bryan. The tract was too heavily wooded, but they suceeded in raising a crop of 8 acres of corn on a tract some ten miles up the Ohio on rich bottom land. He spent a good deal of that spring alone trapping beaver and hunting buffalo. That fall his father removed from Brushy Fork to Nathan's new place and built a cabin in the woods nearby and commenced at once clearing; by the next spring they had four or five acres ready for planting. They were joined by Jesse that same spring. By this time all were preparing to remove to Missouri. Jesse remained on this place until he moved to Missouri in 1818. 6S210-212

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:51:49 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27930
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27930


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
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None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: In the fall of 1794 Nathan went out hunting with DB; camped on the northern bank of the Ohio, 2 or 3 miles above the mouth of Campaign Creek, 10 or 12 miles above Point Pleasant. Frosty weather and falling leaves. One morning his father went off, leaving Nathan to tend camp; a large buck came within 20 or 25 steps, Nathan grabbed his gun and fired; the buck ran off. DB hurried back at the sound of the report and was relieved to find that there was no Indian trouble; examining the ground where the deer had stood, he found hair which he said the ball had cut off, a few steps further found a few drops of blood; searching further, some 60-80 yards, they found the dead buck -- it was the first deer Nathan had killed. After this DB did not leave Nathan, but took him into the woods, showed him the tricks of hunting deer; to take aim when the deer's head was down feeding, not when up chewing. Nathan killed one or two others on his first day out with his father. On their fifth night, while about to retire, DB heard the sound of chopping from across the river; he quickly concluded that they were Indians, who had discovered their camp fire, and were building a raft with which to cross the river. He told Nathan to load the canoe, they got in, told the boy to cover himself with the blanket and lay in the bow of the canoe, he silently pushed off from the stern, and bending his head low to the water was able to see just below the dense fog -- saw the Indians and steered away from them. [This stuff for the excellent woodsman teaching the boy.] 6S199

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:52:25 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27931
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27931


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Fall of 1791 DB took Rebecca and Nathan, leaving Daniel Morgan and Jesse to manage the business, and went to Richmond, elected to the legislature. Nathan remembered gathering persimmons in his hat and almost ruining it, going to the door keeper of the legislature and having him call out his father so he could get some pocket money from him to buy some little things, getting oysters in the shell down at the river & roasting them in a fire on the beach, and the weather was cold, and he would shiver, and hover around the fire. On the return home they stoped to visit Henry Miller in Augusta county VA; DB admiring the horns of a large bull -- would make a good powder horn, and Miller killing the animal straight away and giving DB the horns, and his father engraving his name and the year upon it; later Nathan lost it to the Indians on an early hunting trip in MO. 6S178-79

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:54:12 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27932
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27932


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: From the fall of 1787 to early 1788 DB digging a quantity of gingseng, employing several hands; and in buying up what he could. DB, his boys [Daniel Morgan (19), Jesse (15), and Nathan (7)], and the hands camped out among the hills to facilitate the digging. By spring 1788 he had some 12 to 15 tons and loaded a keel boat and started up the river with his family along, destined for Philadelphia to market the seng. Left his son-in-law Philip Goe to attend to his business. At the head of a large island just above Gallipolis, attempting to cross the strong current at the head of the island, the boat careened upon the drift wood & filled with water; no one was hurt, but everything in the boat got wet, and the geng was much damaged. Landed at Point Pleasant three miles up river. John Van Bibber & others came to his aid; they dried some of the geng spread out on the shore, but all was injured, and he did not get half the price he had planned on getting. At Van Bibber's invitation, the Boones stayed a while at his house, while DB readjusted his cargo. Left at the Van Bibbers the little ten year old girl, Chloe Flinn, whom DB had brought up from Limestone, where she had been delivered from captivity by the Indians, probably at the treaty of 1787. DB had encountered John Van Bibber in the winter of ca 1780. Out hunting, DB came across the tracks of a man in the snow, followed them and came upon Van Bibber nearly dead. His story: he and several companions had taken a load of bear's oil to Natchez where they had sold it to some Spanish traders, but not before adulterating it in order to get more; on their way back they were overtaken by the furious traders, a battle ensued, and several of Van Bibber's companions had been killed, the rest scattered. So now Van Bibber was delighted to return the favor. After a few days the trip continued, reaching Redstone in cherry blossom season. Then overland to Philadelphia where they sold the seng to Col. Thomas Hart (in Hagarstown, MD). Then went on to his old neighborhood of Berks county, taking his wife and three sons. On the way back, by Hagerstown, by sled, DB purchased a stock of goods for the frontier trade, determined to relocate at Point Pleasant. 6S167-72

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:54:47 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27933
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27933


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: On arriving at the Shawnee towns, the Indians fled; their dogs were seen running. DB said that if they would follow the dogs they would find Indians. Pursued on horseback, soon saw several Indians running, and pursuing, gaining closely on them, one turned looked back over his shoulder, and DB recognized him by his remarkable face and called out to those with him: "Mind that fellow, I know him, it's Big Jim, who killed my son in Powell's valley." Hearing what DB had yelled, Big Jim wheeled and fired, killing one man [LCD: Capt. Irvine], while at the same moment Big Jim took a ball and fell wounded in the tall grass; while the men gathered round to help their wounded comrad, Big Jim reloaded his gun, and as some of the men approached toward him he fired and wounded, perhaps killed another. Then some other men rushed up and killed him. The incident with Hugh Leeper may have happened on this campaign. 6S161

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:55:20 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27934
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27934


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Limestone Treaty of 1787. Nathan said his father conducted this treaty council; the Indians camped on the flat just above the mouth of Limestone creek, where were then trees standing. A couple of young Indians left as hostages for the bringing in, probably, of white captives, were kept in Boone's custody, and were at length released. For their protection DB sent his son Daniel Morgan to go with them a few miles over the Ohio into the wilderness. 6S166

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:55:42 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27935
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27935


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851 2: DB and his men were at the point of the "V," pressing into the Indian flank; he <felt elated with the success & prospect . . . . He killed an Indian and passed by him; as they would press upon the enemy, they [the Indians] would fall back a piece & take another tree or stump -- and it was one thus on the retreat that Col. Boone killed.> DB <used to say, that he BELIEVED he had killed Indians on other occasions, [but] he was only positive of having killed this one.> Suddenly McGary came riding up exclaiming, "Col. Boone, whay are you not retreating, Todd & Trigg's line has given way, and the Indians are all around you." DB collected his men in a group and ordered them to break through the Indians in retreat, for they had now gotten behind him. Isreal had remained close to his father throughout the attack; he had been suffering with the "slow fever" and was recovering. DB got him on a horse & told him to make his escape; DB ran for another horse for himself, and Isreal, instead of heading for the river, lingered to ride with his father. Olive: said at this point Isreal said to DB: "Father, I won't leave you." DB turned and supposed Isreal was riding away when he heard some struggling on the ground to his side, and turning saw his son fallen from his horse, [Olive says he turned and say Isreal shot and fall] the blood gushing from his mouth in a stream several inches, his arms outstretched and shivering -- doubtless a mortal wound. Db barely had time to mount and escape. Wheeled off from the main body, went to the right and forded the river about half a mile below the main ford. DB was with Logan's party burying the dead. He recognized Isreal's body from its position and some body marks; his face was blackened and swollen, as were all the others on the battle ground; he had been shot through the heart, a mortal wound. None of the bodies were torn or eaten by varmints. Nathan: <Col. Boone used to be deeply effected even to tears, when he spoke of the Blue Lick defeat, & the death of his son.> Olive: He <would shed tears when speaking of Isreal's death & the sad events of that day. Isreal had long been sick previously -- & had recovered or nearly so, leaving him with a stiff neck, & his father & family tried all they could to persuade him not to go, but he would go. Col. Boone used to lament that Israel did go and that he did not ride off when he first gave him the horse.> 6S157,165-166

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:56:26 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27936
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27936


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: DB used to say that several Indian prisoners were placed in a cabin, when Hugh Leeper rushed in & tomahawked one of them, a fine looking young warrior, and was not much censured to it [this may have happened on Logan's campaign in 86]. He used to mention going to Willstown and finding the Indians had fled; they plundered and burned it. He with Logan's party reached Laramie's trading store in the night; that Laramie hearing them, blew out his candle and dodged behind the door; and when the store was filled with the soldiers, he slipped through the crowd and escaped. Several Indian towns were destroyed on this campaign. 6S159

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:57:06 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27937
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27937


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851 1: DB counseled waiting for Logan, or, if they must attack, to go down river and come up on the Indians' rear. It was then that <McGary spurred his horse into the water, calling out "All who are not damned cowards follow me, and I'll soon show you the Indians." One & another began to follow, under this imputation. Seeing the mass going, Col. Boone (who thought Maj. McGary was throwing out an imputation against his bravery) said "I can go as far as any man," & joined the advancing soldiery, as did the other officers.> [Note that both here, and in his challenge to his son, fear of cowardice was a compelling motive, and both worked toward disaster and tragedy.] 6S154-155 continued

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:57:40 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27938
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27938


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: <It was Col. Boone's opinion, that the landlord was the plotter of the scheme, & that an old white woman was the instrument, & that she must have been secreted in the room, either under the bed or elsewhere, as the door was fastened when Boone & his companion retired to rest, & the door was found open the next morning.> Some who had given him money forgave him the debt, if debt it could be called, viewing it as an accident for which he was not morally responsible; others required repayment. <It was a heavy loss to Boone.>

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:58:13 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27939
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27939


1780

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
People
None.
ROBBERY took place in James City, VA; DB's companion was a Mr. Giynes [?] VIRGINIA GAZETTE 7/26/1780 6S145

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 10:59:03 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27940
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27940


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851; Long Seige 3: The firing commenced. The Indians attempted to storm the fort, but were forced back by the marksmen. This the first day. <During the seige, Jemima Boone, busy in rendering aid, carrying amunition & food to the men, she was fearless, & seemed to expose herself more than the other females: Thus recd. a spent ball, which scarcely buried itself in the flesh (perhaps in her back) carrying her linen undress [sic] with it, by which the ball was easily drewn out.> William Hays, who had accompanied Rebecca and the family back to North Carolina, was by the time of the seige back and fully participated. 6S136-140 continued

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:02:27 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27941
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27941


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: <Boone while a prisoner, & during the treaty, was considered by both British & Indians as the leading character of the Ky country -- as a sort of Governor. Had used policy with the Indians, & also doubtless with Gov. Hamilton, & hence when Boone escaped, Hamilton addresses his letter to Boone at Boonesborou, as conveyed by Black Fish.> 6S140

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:02:57 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27942
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27942


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851; Long Seige 2: The council began; DB objected to the number of "chiefs" present: "these are not chiefs." Blackfish, looking surprised, ordered them away. Indians still outnumbered Kentuckians two to one. Articles agreed to: Indians to return home; Ohio to be the boundary, not to be passed by either party in a hostile manner. Treaty closed by a friendly shaking of hands, two Indians to each Kentuckian. Black Fish one of those who shook hands with DB. Indians attempted to throw the Kentuckians down the bank; scuffle; DB threw Black Fish (about 50 years old) flat on the ground; and Indian aimed a blow at DB with the pipe-tomahawk, he dodged, the handle struck the back of his head, making a cut two inches long through the skin, leaving a scar over which hair never again grew, the blade cutting a wound between his shoulders. The fire from the fort seemed to confuse the Indians; the Kentuckians easily extracated themselves and escaped to the fort. Squire Boone was wounded (one of 9 times he was wounded during the Indian wars). DB used to say that it was this timely volley from the fort that saved them. The Indians believed that Black Fish had been shot, adding to their dismay. 6S133-36 continued

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:03:41 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27943
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27943


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851; Long Seige 5: Exchange over the mining: Kentuckians: "What are you doing?" Shawnees: "Digging a hole to blow you all to hell!" When the countermining began: Shawnees: "What are you digging?" Kentuckians: "Digging a hole to bury you all in." Later to the Indians: "Dig on -- we'll dig & meet you -- will make a hold to bury 500 of you yellow sons of bitches." 6S138,143

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:04:03 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27944
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27944


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851; Long Seige 4: <One Indian was killed behind the forked tree -- probably not over the river; & so near that other Indians during the day did not venture up to take away the body, & the hogs rolled it about.> 6S143, continued

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:04:23 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27945
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27945


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851; Long Seige 1: Pompey came up and called for DB; told him Black Fish wished to speak to him; DB said they would meet at a certain stump about 60 yards from the fort. There Black Fish presented DB with a letter from Governor Hamilton advising DB to surrender the fort since they surely could not defend the fort against such a force, and that if they resisted, men, women, and children alike would prabably all be massacred, but if they surrendered they would all be safely conveyed to Detroit, their lost property made good to them, and officers should have the same rank under British authority. DB said he was no longer in charge, would have to consult; would meet again the next morning. Black Fish said his people were hungry, and DB invited them to kill what stock needed but not to waste any. DB and the others retired, and immediately the Indians commenced whooping and yelling, some shooting down cattle, others cutting down corn. Other cattle were let into the fort, where they remained throughout the seige. In the fort all were in favor of resistance; but they agreed to ask for more time to consult to gain time. DB asked for another day the next morning. The next am he again met with Black Fish and told him the people had determined to resist surrender as long as there was a man living. Black Fish acted much surprised at this; said he had been ordered by Hamilton not to massacre the inhabitants, and proposed to treat with the Kentuckians; each of the Shawnee towns represented by a chief, and DB saying that there were also many officers in the fort (more than there actually were) who would also have to take part in the council. 6S129-133 continued

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:04:46 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27946
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27946


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Fall of 1796 DB, Nathan, Flanders Callaway, and two men named Maupin and White went on a fall and winter hunt, each taking a horse and no traps. On Big Sandy, above Young's Salt Works, they killed some 30-40 bears by New Year's. They rendered the bear's meat into oil, each carcass producing some 10-20 gallons, selling for $1/gallon. The next year DB did not go, but Nathan, Flanders, and Jesse went back and brought in 156 bears. 6S206-207

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:05:15 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27947
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27947


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: According to Nathan, he was the person who urged his father to relocate to the interior; had fallen in love with the "quietness and safety of the interior" as opposed to the constant danger of Indian attack on the river. His parents agreed, and in the spring or summer of 1795 they descended the Ohio, landed at Limestone, and proceeded to Bourbon county, settling on a tract of unimproved land belonging to his son Daniel Morgan on the waters of Brushy Fork of Hinkston, about 6 miles east of Millersburg, about 12 miles from the Lower Blue Licks. DB and Nathan cleared some 10 acres and raised two crops there in 1796 and '97. 6S205

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:05:55 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27948
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27948


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Nathan Boone was sent to school in KY in 1793; lived with Flanders Callaway's on a branch of Hickman's Creek about six miles from Boone's Station, and occasionally at William Hay's about two miles away; a Baptist school taught by Rev. John Price, about half-way between the residences of the two uncles. In the fall of 1794 he came back, accompanied by his brother Daniel Morgan, by Matthias and Isaac Van Bibber, and John Scholl, all of whom had been in KY visiting friends; they walked and rode to Maysville, then by canoe up the Ohio to Point Pleasant. 6S198

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:06:34 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27949
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27949


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Fall of 1791 (year after he went to the Virginia Legislature) DB killed 9 buffaloes for their meat, most he had ever killed or would kill in the Kanhawa country. Came home and took Nathan back to pack home the meat. On the way they saw many possums coming down to the water's edge to drink, very fat; killed some to render down for their oil. 6S197-198

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:07:55 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27950
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27950


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: In the fall of 1792 DB and his son Daniel Morgan were out deer hunting about a mile from the Ohio on the first creek below Chickamanga Creek (the first below Gallipolis). DMB encountered 3 Indians, two of whom fired at him, missed, chased him half a mile, he outstripping them, being fleet of foot; in camp, DB heard the shots; secreted himself off to the side, soon saw his son run into camp. They gathered up their things and passed over the river. This year it was too dangerous to hunt. 6S195-96

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:08:30 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27951
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27951


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Neither knew anything about it; was apparently something DB did not discuss with his family. 6S144

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:09:42 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27952
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27952


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Did not know about the "troubles" while DB in NC to bring his family back, but Nathan thought <that the Bryans, some of whom were Tories, might have used their influence to prevail upon Mrs. Boone not to return to the dangers & exposures of KY & she may have well opposed it herself aside from any such influence.> 6S144

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:10:25 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27953
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27953


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: The earliest memory that Nathan Boone had involved this move from the farm on Marble Creek near Boone's Station to Limestone. Riding through the thick cane bewteen the Blue Licks and Limestone, several buffaloes ran from the cane break across the road and knocked one of the pack horses over. 6S159-60

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:11:02 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27954
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27954


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Here DB kept a tavern and house of entertainment as well as a warehouse for the storage of goods; also served as a deputy surveyor. His warehouse located just below the mouth of Limestone creek, near the riverbank; his residence a few yards lower down and farther back from the water. 6S160,167

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:11:49 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27955
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27955


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Around 1788 or '89 DB bought up a drove of horses in KY and had his sons Daniel Morgan and Jesse drive them by way of Big Sandy to Col. Hart at Hagarstown. On the long drive they lost horses, and DB did not recover his costs. 6S174

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:12:18 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27956
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27956


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Olive says that when DB was released he promised <not to take up arms any more.> 6S151

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:13:20 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27957
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27957


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Nathan says that his uncle William Hays was <a bad tempered, drinking man; got killed by his son-in-law in Mo on the Femme Osage, in St. Charles Co., in about 1808 [LCD: actually on 12/13/1804].>

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:14:05 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27958
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27958


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: He sold off his original stock of goods and probably did not renew them. Lived in one of the houses just up the Kanhawa from the point (Point Pleasant). 6S176

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:14:54 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27959
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27959


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Winter of 1792-93 DB delayed returning from his hunt. Olive said there was much concern for his safety, finally showed up; Indians were very troublesome. Gave rise to the report printed in the US GAZETTE of DB's death. 6S196-197

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:15:39 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27960
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27960


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Nearly the whole of DB's residence at Point Pleasant was a time of Indian troubles. People would flee to the fort at every alarm, which was frequent. 6S203

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:16:09 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27961
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27961


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Nathan assisted his father surveying a large tract near the mouth of Blaine's Creek on Big Sandy in 10/1797. In his father's supplies was a substantial quantity of "Old Monongahela." 6S211

File: 6S3.DR1



    Created: 8/13/2017 11:17:06 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-27962
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-27962


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
<Died on Tuesday, 26th September, at Charette village, in the 90th year of his age [sic], the celebrated Col. Daniel Boone, discoverer and first settler of the State of Kentucky. His death was communicated to the General Assembly on Thursday, the 28th inst., by Mr. Emmons, Senator from St. Charles county, and both branches of the Legislature, through respect to his memory, adjourned for the day, and passed a resolution to wear crape on the left arm for twenty days. Col. Boone emigrated to Upper Louisiana, and settled on the Missouri river, about fifty miles above St. Louis, before the purchase of the country, and received from the Spanish Government a donation of 2000 arpents of land. The American Congress confirmed that grant to him, that is to say, they did not undertake to deprive him of what he had received from a foreign Government. This is the only favor which the discoverer of Kentucky, and the founder of that great State, has received from his country. The family of Col. Boone also emigrated to Missouri, and enjoy a respect worthy of the name of their father. One of his sons, Major Nathan Boone, was a member of the late Missouri Convention; another Jesse B. Boone, Esq., is a member of the present General Assembly. Until within two years past, Col. Boone has enjoyed much health, and was capable of great bodily activity. Since then, the approach of death was visible, and he viewed it with the indifference of a Roman philosopher. He was buried at the Charette village, and thus the remains of the man whose name is identified with that of Kentucky now repose on the banks of the Missouri.> ST. LOUIS ENQUIRIER n.d. 6S341-342

File: 6S5.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 1:29:36 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28142
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28142


1848-10-05

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with ex-Governor Edward Coles of Illinois, Philadelphia, 10/5/1848: Coles visited DB shortly before his death; Coles said that Judge Thomas Todd, and early lawyer in KY who knew DB well, told him that <it was a mistake that Boone left Kentucky on account of the rapid settlement of the country, leaving him with two [sic] little elbow room, -- that the real cause was, that he was careless concerning his business transactions -- had made chimney-corner surveys [LCD: at his own fire-side, naming some trees as corners from his own memory of them & their relative distances & positions, for quantity, &c.] & having received money from others to make entries for them, which from his own want of business habits, & subsequent losses of title by better or prior surveys, plunged him into difficulty -- & to avoid these troubles -- law-suits, sheriffs, & pressing demands, he removed to Kenhawa, where hunting was good, & subsequently to Missouri: That he was soured against Kentucky, & Boone also so represented his feelings to Gov. Coles. And Gov. Coles thinks, that if Col. Boone's bones could but speak the real feelings the old man cherished in his life-time, they would have protested indignantly against their removal to Kentucky. That Col. Boone was (as Judge Thos. Todd represented) a member of the Va Legislature -- & would be burthened with land entries to make for others. That Col. Dl. Boone's son -- a member of the Missouri Legislature [Jesse Boone] said his father was indignent at Congress for the land gift made him -- saying that he was no beggar -- no pauper; & would write a letter to the Speaker refusing the land, &c. But Congress had adjourned when Col. Boone heard of the passage of the law, & it was then too late to write, & at length his son persuaded him to abandon the idea for the present -- to which he reluctantly yielded, with, however, the resolve that he would write and refuse the grant when Congress should meet again. But he never wrote. 6S310-311

File: 6S5.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 1:30:38 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28143
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28143


1848-10-05

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with ex-Governor Edward Coles of Illinois, Philadelphia, 10/5/1848: Coles visited DB shortly before his death; 5'10"; fair, light complexioned; one of the finest forms and noblest foreheads Coles ever saw. <He appeared more like having led a sedentary life than that of a borderer and Indian fighter. That though at first reserved & barely answering questions respectfully, he soon became communicative, warmed up, & became animated in narrating his early adventures in the West: He was easy & genteel in his carriage & deportment; & Gov. Coles was agreeably disappointed in not finding him the rough, uncouth pioneer he had expected. 6S311

File: 6S5.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 1:31:23 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28144
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28144


1856-12-06

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
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None.
Edward Coles to LCD, Philadelphia, 12/6/1856: Doubts whether DB ever revisited KY; <This impression is founded on a recollection of the soreness of the feelings he entertained as I heard from others, and which he displayed to me, occasioned by the conduct he received from many of the citizens of that State, which it was believed to have been the cause of his removing, first to the western part of Virginia, and afterwards to Missouri. The conduct I allude to as having displeased him grew out of the carless manner he did his own business, as well as that intrusted to him by others, and his indebtness from this and other causes, and the wrong and embarressment this occasioned.> 6S317

File: 6S5.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 1:32:36 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28145
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28145


1832

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
People
None.
Recollection from an unnamed Kentucky pioneer, written to James Hall, ca 1832: In Kentucky, early 1780s: <We were frequently together . . . and several times in the woods, surveying, in company; and a more agreeable, friendly companion I have never seen. In stature, I think he was about five feet ten inches high, and well proportioned. His appearance was fine, his manners easy, his mind strong and philosophic, his disposition mild and placid, and his character unimpeachable. A more friendly and hospitable man never lived.> ILLINOIS MAGAZINE 2 (June 1832):401 6S321-322

File: 6S5.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 1:33:25 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28146
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28146


1851-11-25

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
Interview with Morgan and Elizabeth Boone Bryan, she a daughter of Flanders Callaway, Marthasville MO, 11/25/1851: Near Marthasville, Mrs. Ramsey and two of her children, one boy, one girl were killed in April or May of 1815. Mr. Ramsey was a cripple; he held the Indians off from within his cabin with another son. A fourth child, a little girl, hid in the weeds along the fence and the Indians overlooked her. There was a fort near Flanders Callaway's where DB was at the time; he shouldered his rifle and went on the trail of the Indians, went all through the woods to satisfy himself that they were gone. DB calm and vigilant. Most of the men were absent on ranging duty. 6S299-300

File: 6S5.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 1:34:18 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28147
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28147


1851-11-25

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Morgan and Elizabeth Boone Bryan, she a daughter of Flanders and Jemima Boone Callaway, Marthasville MO, 11/25/1851: At the rescue: Indian at the fire patching his moccasins; heard a crunch in the brush, turned and looked, but then went back to his work. Indians that day were unconcerned, convinced they had outpaced their pursuerers. One man shot early, and DB told Mr. Bryan that his excuse was that the Indians had seen him, and he was afraid they would tomahawk the girls. The girls were tied at night, and Jemima had a small pocket knife that whe tried to get at, but could not. 6S301-302

File: 6S5.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 1:35:01 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28148
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28148


1851-11-25

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Morgan and Elizabeth Boone Bryan, she a daughter of Flanders Callaway, Marthasville MO, 11/25/1851: Samuel and Thomas Bryan were the only Tories or royalists among the family. All other brothers were Whigs: Joseph, Morgan, James, and William. 6S303-304

File: 6S5.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 1:35:40 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28149
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28149


1851-11

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Mrs. Frances Lamme, oldest surviving daughter of Flanders and Jemima Boone Callaway, Marthasville MO, ca 11/1851: At the rescue, one Indian on his knees blowing the fire, another guarding as sentinel, but at the fire talking to the other, lucky, for the whites came up just where he had been standing. One Indian, in flight, threw his tomahawk at the girls, but it missed. 6S305-306

File: 6S5.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 1:36:28 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28150
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28150


1851-11

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
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None.
Interview with Mrs. Frances Lamme, oldest surviving daughter of Flanders and Jemima Boone Callaway, Marthasville MO, ca 11/1851: Jemima and Flanders married soon after her captivity and before her father's captivity. Married by Col. Richard Callaway. 6S304

File: 6S5.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 1:37:01 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28151
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28151


1851-11

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
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None.
Interview with James Boone, eldest son of Nathan Boone, Bolivar MO, ca 11/1851: Long Seige. Says that DB killed an Indian on the hill opposite the fort, over the river, with his famous gun "Tick-Licker." The famous "Long Shot." Heard this from DB himself. 6S295

File: 6S5.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 1:37:39 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28152
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28152


1851-11

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with James Boone, eldest son of Nathan Boone, Bolivar MO, ca. 11/1851: Like Nathan, James says it was DB cracking nuts; had his knife in his hand when the Indians shot; ran, lost his knife in the stream; later it was recovered and sent to Nathan. 6S296

File: 6S5.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 1:38:13 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28153
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28153


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
LCD memo: DB left Limestone late in 1788 or very early in 1789 and went on to PA and Hagarstown MD, got back so as to pass Fort Harmar on 5/13/1789 [thus this entry in Col. Hamar's diary, kept at Fort Harmar opposite Marietta: <1789, May 13th, Wednesday. Colonel Boone left the garrison this evening in a Kentucky boat for Limestone.>]. On his way, getting acquainted with the Van Bibbers at Point Pleasant, he concluded to resettle there, but found it necessary to return to Limestone to settle up his affairs, sell his property, get his effects; there he purchased a drove of horses and sent them by his sons on the newly cut-out route of Sandy, opened in early 1789. 6S332

File: 6S5.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 1:39:21 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28154
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28154


1796

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
<Died in Tennessee, Scolacutta, commonly called Hanging-Maw, a great and beloved chief of the Cherokees, aged about sixty five years: A man distinguished for his love of peace and exertions for its preservation between his nation and the United States. In his death humanity has lost an able supporter.> NEW YORK MAGAZINE, 5/1796:280 6S337

File: 6S5.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 1:40:18 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28155
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28155


1832

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Recollection from an unnamed Kentucky pioneer, written to James Hall, ca 1832: Alone in Kentucky: <He declared that he never enjoyed himself better in his life; he had three dogs that kept his camp while he was hunting; and at night he would often lie by his fire and sing every song he could think of, while the dogs would sit round him, and give as much attention as if they understood every word he was saying.> ILLINOIS MAGAZINE 2 (June 1832):401 6S323

File: 6S5.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 1:41:39 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28156
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28156


1848-10-05

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with ex-Governor Edward Coles of Illinois, Philadelphia, 10/5/1848: Coles visited DB shortly before his death; asked him what motive induced him "to penetrate the wilds of the West;" DB replied that some one [LCD: undoubtedly Findley] <gave so sharming a description of Kentucky, the Falls of the Ohio, & wild game, that at once fired his imagination, & so completely promised to fulfill his romantic desires, that he resolved to visit the country.> 6S309

File: 6S5.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 1:42:34 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28157
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28157


1818

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
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None.
Edward Coles to LCD, Albermarle county VA, 9/27/18[??]: <Although at times depressed in spirits, when he became too old & feeble to partake of his favourite amusement of hunting, was in the enjoyment of good health, and active for a man of his age, and very fond of company, and telling about the adventures of his life, and enjoyed the society of those who took an interest in such matters.> 6S316
BOONEMSS 2/23/1806: <I cartify that I gave permistion to Benjamin Gardner to satle on a pies of land cold Little Purrary, on the Missury, some time in December, 1802. Given under my hand this 23d day of Febury, 1806. <Daniel Boone.> 6S326

File: 6S5.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 1:43:47 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28158
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28158


1832

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Recollection from an unnamed Kentucky pioneer, written to James Hall, ca 1832: <When a boy I knew him. He lived within a mile and a half of my father's, in Culpepper county, Virginia, for two years, and I frequently set up targets for him to shoot at. From thence he moved to North Carolina; and I saw no more of him, until I met him in Kentucky, in 1781.> ILLINOIS MAGAZINE 2 (June 1832):401 6S321

File: 6S5.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 1:45:01 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28159
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28159


1788-10-09

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
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10/9/1788: <Oct. 9th 1788 recd. 15 caggs [kegs] of ginsang of Capt. Fagan [Daniel Figgins] for Hart.> Entry in one of DB's account books. 6S330

File: 6S5.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 1:45:51 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28160
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28160


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Statement of Samuel Haycroft: Mrs. Boone was his mother's midwife at his birth, 10/1/1788 near Boone's Station; she was probably there visiting her daughter, Susannah Boone Hays, just prior to going up to the Kenhawa country and from there to Pennsylvania. 6S231

File: 6S5.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 1:46:42 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28161
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28161


Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Nathan's wife Olive was considered "the handsomest young lady north of the Ohio." HISTORY OF THE LOWER SCIOTO VALLEY:102 6S332

File: 6S5.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 1:48:05 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28162
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28162


1789-12-22

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
Col. Clendenin, Richmond VA, 12/22/1789: <I am informed by Col. Andw. Lewis, of Bottecourt, that they [the Indians] have killed young Daniel [Morgan] Boone, and took his father Old Col. Boone prisoner; & I fear this news is true, as the circumstances that accompany the information give credit to it.> 6S333

File: 6S5.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 1:49:20 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28163
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28163


1797

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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<This day we hear the Indians have killed Colonel Daniel Boone, his son and son-in-law, when out viewing lands on Red River. This latter report wants confirmation, though it comes pretty direct.> NEW YORK WEEKLY MUSEUM 2/25/1797 6S337

File: 6S5.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 1:49:58 AM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28164
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28164


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
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People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851. DB's death, 1: Was sick off and on after the Loutre Lick trip of 1817. Summer of 1820 spent at Flanders Callaway's. It was there he had his portrait painted by Harding. <They all thought it good, except that it did not exhibit the plump cheer, and hence the broad face he used to exhibit in his robust days.> He had an attack of fever, not severe, & recovering was exceedingly anxious to be taken to Nathan's; Nathan visiting him with Olive, DB insisted on being taken back to the stone house in a litter slung between two horses, but Dr. Jones would not allow it. After recovering another few weeks, he was taken to Femme Osage by Nathan in a carriage, accompanied by two of Nathan's little sons, Howard and John, 6 and 4 respectively. Reaching home at mid day, he was cheerful and in good spirits. Told his grandchildren he would soon be well enought to go with them to gather the hazelnuts he had seen along the road. That afternoon he enjoyed <the innocent prattle of his grandchildren, & to please them he would partake of the cakes, nuts & even buttermilk they affectionately presented to him. In this way, it was afterwards thought, he loaded his stomach with articles too rich & gross.> But resting pretty well that night, the next day he arose and went out upon the porch, surveyed the farm, and said if he felt as good the next day he would take a horseback ride about the place to see it. He was brought inside, and lay down on his bed and slept; before he woke, it was discovered he was running a fever; he woke an complained of an acute burning in his breast such as he had never before felt. He continued to grow worse. 6S278-279 continued

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 3:48:34 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28237
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28237


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851. DB's death, 2: Advised to take medicine, he declined; would do no good -- this was his last sickness. Calmly he told them he was not afraid to die. He recognized his relative who came to see him; talked till within a few minutes of his last breath. Some ten minutes before the end, his daughter Jemima arrived; he recognized her and died "placidly, only exhibiting a scowl with his last breath." At the end, asked if he suffered pain, he said in his breast and between his shoulders. Died on the monring of 9/26/1820 about sunrise, fourth day after his arrival at Nathan's. Body carried back to Callaway's and the funeral took place there; no military or Masonic honors (although he was a Mason [!], there were few brothers in his area). Baptist Rev. James Craig (son-in-law of Nathan) delivered the funeral sermon. Very large crowd; remains buried beside Rebecca on the elevated second bank of the Missouri, a mile from the river. 6S279-80

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 3:49:18 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28238
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28238


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: 11/1817 DB started on a hunting trip, taking his grandson James Boone, Nathan's oldest son, each mounted. Left from Flanders Callaway's, up Charette creek to its headwaters, about 13 miles. That evening, without a shelter in camp, it began to snow, two inches; but it was not too cold. A wild duck lit down directly beside the fire, and James caught it in its bewilderment; DB said he had never known an instance of the sort before; <came to them as the quails came to the children of Israel>. DB was elated at the campfire. This was the first night he had camped out in several years. [But what about the year before with Indian Philips?] <He seemed to feel himself in his ancient element.> DB told stories of olden time adventures, of Indian warfare and hunting exploits. Had the duck for breakfast the next morning. They continued on. The weather turned very cold, and they had to stop once and make a fire to warm DB. Went only 8 miles and stopped at a house of entertainment at Camp Branch, a noted camping place for travellers. Next day went to Loutre Lick, 22 miles; weather moderated a little, but still cold. The cold seriously effected DB's "aged frame." He found he could proceed no further, could not bear the exposure, and concluded to remain at his grand-daughter's, Mrs. Maj. Van Bibber's at Loutre Lick. Had to abandon the hunt. <DB said he was as naturally inclined each fall to go hunting & trapping, as for the framer in spring to set about putting in his crops.> James returned home, DB remained at his grandaughter's, where he took "alarmingly ill, & was thought to be dying." Word came to Nathan, who, before he left to go to his father, ordered a coffin to be made that the funeral could be held immediately on his return, and his father buried near Charette next to Rebecca. Nathan arrived in a light carriage to find his father recovered. Rode home with Nathan in a few days. At Nathan's he disapproved of the coffin, it was too rough and uncouth. He had a much better one made of cherry. Kept it in Nathan's attic, greatly to the fear of all the little folks at the house. He would frequently go up and look at it to see that no accident or injury befel it. 6S273-77

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 3:50:01 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28239
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28239


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: <DB in his old age, when his hearing became hard -- seeing strangers approaching his son Nathan's, & anticipating their prying curiosity & inquisitiveness, would take hiscane & walk off to avoid them. [But] he retained his mild disposition to the last.> 6S277

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 3:51:00 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28240
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28240


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: In his latter years DB was a "great student of the Bible," would seldom read anything else. Fully believed in the great truths of Christianity. Seemed most partial toward the Presbyterians, though he disliked the unkind differences too frequently manifested by different sects. Had all his children that he could christened. <His worship was in secret, and he placed his hopes in the Savior. Whenever preaching was in his neighborhood, he made it a point to attend, & well remembered what he heard and read.> 6S280-81

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 3:51:38 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28241
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28241


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: About 1816 DB stayed a while in the home of Dr. John Jones of near Marthasville, married to a daughter of Flanders Callaway. Placed himself under the man's care for scrofulous affection that had sometimes troubled him; but also to dictate to the man a narrative of his life and adventures. Rough notes were taken of his life up to his emigration to MO. Because of his ensuing illnesses the narrative was never completed. Jones was to have prepared it for the press with the profits going to DB. In 1839 Jones showed it to Nathan's son, Benjamin Howard Boone; Jones kept it, hoping that Nathan would join him in completing it. Jones died suddenly in 1842, and the narrative disappeared. No clue of its whereabouts. Was about 20-30 sheets, four-doubled [so about 80-120 pages long]. Nathan said that neigher he nor any of his family were aware of the Boone narrative in Filson's work. [!!!] 6S273

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 3:52:51 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28242
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28242


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: DB hired a man to accompany him on a western hunt in 1816 -- Indian Philips, who frequently lived among the Indians: lazy, indolent, possessed of much of the Indian charcter. Up the MO in a canoe to mouth of GRand or Iowa River, looking for beaver sign. But the French and Indians had trapped them out. Back on the MO, they went as far as 20 miles above Ft. Leavenworth, then just established. DB fell sick and remained at the fort a few days, and there became acquainted with Capt. Bennet Riley in command of the army there. Still feeling poorly, returned home, Philips with him. (It may have been Fort Osage where DB met Riley.) 6S271

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 3:53:47 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28243
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28243


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
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None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: A hired man, Alexander Logan, came to Nathan's shortly after Rebecca's death [so in late spring of 1813?] and said he had seen an Indian a quarter of a mile off; Olive Boone was alarmed; Nathan was away on ranger duty. But DB took charge: <Was perfectly cool and collected, & disbelieved the report of Logan. He questioned the man, particularly as to what the Indian was doing. Logan replied, that the Indian was picking ticks (wood ticks) off from him. Col. Boone told Logan he now knew he was a liar -- for whenever he was an Indian that distance in the settlements, he would not catch him picking off ticks. It was now about night, & to quiet Mrs. [Olive] Boone's fear, the colonel got down his old rifle, & sat down with his back against the door, & his gun across his lap -- kept sentinel for the night, well persuaded, however, that there was no real occasion for apprehension. Logan had made off. Next morning Col. Boone went & carefully examined the spot where Logan had pretended to have seen the Indian -- but not a sign could be found.> 6S269-70

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 3:54:47 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28244
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28244


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: 5'8", broad shoulders and chest, tapered down; usual weight 175, but at one period exceeded 200, in his last years only about 155. Hair moderately black, eyes blue, skin fair; teeth strong and large [LCD says he saw a large molar at Nathan's.] Never used tobacco in any form; temperate in every thing. Wife never used tobacco either. DB never raised tobacco, said Nathan; so no credit to the TOBACCOSHED story. 6S281

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 3:56:53 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28245
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28245


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: While living on the lower Yadkin, there was a band of robbers and horse thieves who lived back in the mountains and had there made a fort: Owens and wife, a man named Harmon, Cornelius Howard -- altogether about a dozen in the band. They kidnapped a white girl. DB in a party, including the girl's father, that pursued them. Suddenly the lost girl came running up to them; the two men who had kidnapped her had fallen out and were arguing, and she escaped. With the girl as guide, DB and party went and found one of the men wounded and senseless; he was arrested and taken to Salisbury. About a year after, Cornelius Howard was discovered hiding stolen property in his fodder-stack and turned states' evidence; he piloted a large party among whom was DB to the secret fort, many miles in advance of the frontier settlements. Mrs. Owen was taken with others, she asking to see Howard, when he was brought it, she attempted to shot him with a concealed pistol, but the weapon was snatched from her. She called him a Judas, and so he was ever-after known as "Judas Howard." Some years after he was shot from his horse as he was crossing a stream by an unknown assailant. 6S283-284

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 3:59:03 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28246
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28246


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: DB <used to say, that in his early Indian troubles & difficulties in Kentucky, if he DREAMED of his father, & he was angry, it would forbode evil; but if he appeared pleasant, he had nothing to fear: That each time when captured, robbed or defeated, he thus dreamed unfavorably about his father.> 6S282

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 3:59:54 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28247
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28247


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: 1809 DB's grandson James, son of Nathan, was sent to school in St. Charles, boarding at a Frenchman's; he became homesick, and DB and Rebecca took a room at St. Charles and kept house there to make a home for James. Reminded DB of his old uncle Webb, who lived in PA, and kept Daniel at his home when he was a very little boy, and would <greatly pet him.> 6S281-82

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:00:48 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28248
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28248


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
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None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: In his middle years he loved reading history. He had no use for novels. 6S281

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:03:27 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28249
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28249


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: After his wife's death, DB returned to the Femme Osage settlement, and concluded to take down his goods, & Callaway also moving his, goint to take shelter at DMB's fort. DB went by land; goods sent by water; one of the canoes, with 2-3 whites and 2 negroes, unfortunately ran against a "sawyer" [?] and upset, losing much of the load, among the articles DB's manuscript narrative, dictated by him and written down by his grandson John B. Callaway, who lived within a mile of Nathan's, but was then staying with his father. 6S269

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:08:27 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28250
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28250


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Flanders and Jemima settled within a mile of Nathan's in 1799; remained there 7 or 8 years. Then moved to location at the mouth of Charette Creek, within a mile of Marthasville on the MO River. DB and Rebecca went to Flanders Callaway's early in 1813 to aid in sugar making -- there was a good sugar camp on Flanders' place some 4 or 5 miles up Charette creek; Mrs. Boone camped at the sugar grove about a month, began to feel poorly, rode to Callaways, and after a week's sickness died there 3/8/1813. 6S268

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:09:57 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28251
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28251


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Of the Bryan brothers, Samuel and Thomas were Tories; Joseph (Rebecca's father), James, Morgan, and William were Whigs. Samuel Bryan commanded Tories in several battles; came to KY to visit some years after the war; Nathan says he was an impressive man, over six feet; more impressive than any other of the Bryans; he died in NC in 1798. Thomas Bryan was killed while crossing a river by Whig ferrymen who recognized him, knocked him with a club. Edward Boone married one of Rebecca's sisters, Martha. James Bryan settled in the Femme Osage about 1802 with his three sons. William Bryan settled Bryan's Station, where he was killed in 5/1780. 6S288-89

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:10:55 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28252
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28252


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Neighborhood fort at Femme Osage settlement at DMB's place, 4 miles from Nathan's. Pickets enclosed DMB's house. In time of alarm all fled to here. DB and Nathan's family there twice in the dead of night. 6S267-268

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:11:27 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28253
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28253


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
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None.
WAROF1812Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Nathan ordered to raise a company of rangers by Governor William Clark in winter of 1811-12; commissioned by President Madison. Marched up the Mississippi accompanied by Gen. Benjamin Howard; erected Fort madison about 15 miles above the mouth of Salt River on the west bank of the Mississippi. Ranged between the Mississippi and Missouri. After 3 months returned home, raised another company in June for 12 months, went out again under Gen. Howard. 8/1813 Nathan with a party of 17 men went to reconnoitre and select a route for the army to march against the Indian towns at Peoria. Among the men was his nephew James Callaway. Attacked by Indians. Nathan nearly shot, saved by tripping in a sink hole. Was then with the army marching to Peoria. In the home neighborhood, Mrs. Ramsey was killed in her yard near Charette [Marthasville]; Mr. Ramsey wounded but kept the Indians off; children in the house. In one battle in 1815 James Callaway killed; left wife and three children; had been member of the MO territorial council, sheriff and collector of St. Charles county. 6S254-267

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:11:52 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28254
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28254


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Rebecca Boone Goe died at Joseph Scholl's (husband of her sister Levinia) in about 1805; Philip Goe did not long survive her; they had seven children (among the survivors in 1851 William [KY], Tarleton [Callaway county MO], and a daughter married to a Bloss [Jackson county MO]). Susannah Boone Hayes came to MO in 1800 and died shortly after; she left nine children (among the survivors in 1851 Daniel Hays [St. Charles county MO], and Mahalia Davis [where?]). Levinia Boone Scholl was survived by her husband Joseph for several years; they had seven children (among the survivors in 1851 Joseph Scholl Jr [Callaway county MO]). Daniel Morgan Boone had nine children (among the survivors in 1851 Edward [Jackson county MO]). Jesse Boone had eight children (among the survivors in 1851 Harriet Baber [Jefferson City MO], Minerva Boggs, wife of ex-Governor L. W. Boggs [Sonoma CA], Albert [Westport MO], Madison [Callaway county MO], Van Daniel [Jackson county MO], Mrs. Henderson, wife of Judge Henderson [Fulton MO]). Nathan and Olive had fourteen children (among the survivors in 1851 James [Bolivar MO], John Coburn [CA], Benjamin Howard [Green county MO, adjoining his father]. Flanders and Jemima Boone Callaway had ten grown children (among the survivors in 1851 Mrs Lamme and Mrs Morgan [Marthasville MO], Mrs. Howell [where?]). 6S253-54

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:12:31 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28255
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28255


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851; 1: Were initiated by the suggestion of his son Jesse; petitions drawn up by Judge Coburn. Petitioned not for a confirmation of his 1000 arpent grant, but for a grant of 10,000 acres in consideration of his early services in discovering and settling Kentucy; mentioned his losses and his poverty. Petition sent to Judge Jesse Boone; Nathan included a memorandum of the desired locality of the 10,000 acres: northern bank of the Missouri, beginning at the mouth of Big Bonne Gemme, and chiefly above the Bonne Femme, one of the finest tracts of land in Missouri. <The bill was in a fair way of passage, favored by the influence of Gen. Jos. Desha, M.C. from Ky, when Mr. Hempstead, the Missouri Delegate, ignorantly said that some who had spoken were mistaken -- that Col. Boone only asked for a confirmation of his old Spanish grant -- that it was a misapprehension as to the supposed donation asked for. This blunder of Mr. Hempstead's was adopted, losing sight of the memorial, supposing the Missouri Delegate must know fully the merits and intentions of the case. So the memorandum relative to the 10,000 acres was never alluded to -- the old claim confirmed, as it had not been sold -- no public lands having yet been brought into market in Missouri. Col. Boone was doubless vexed -- Congress, with a show of generoisity, had yet given him no grant, merely confirmed his old & rightful glaim, which was previously fairly his: Besides, Congress not long after passed a general law confirming all similar claims. It may be that the amount of the donation Col. Boone expected was not specified in his petition -- if not, it was sufficient intimated in the memorandum sent with the petition.> 6S249-251 continued

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:13:53 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28256
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28256


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851; 2: <James Bridges & one or two others seeing this grant by Congress in the papers, hastened on from Kentucky with their ancient claims against Col. Boone for lands which he had originally conveyed, the titles to which had proved invalid in the courts of Ky; & Col. Boone disposed of every acre of this Congress confirmation of his old Spanish grant in liquidation of these demands. It is not recollected that any other claimants came out to Missouri (none ever came except old land claims, from failure of title) except one man, from Kentucky -- & this was after Col. Boone had yielded up the whole tract and had nothing left. Boone had made this man's wife, when an orphan child, a present of a tract of land, & it was subsequently overslaughed [sic] by an earlier or more precise entry. Col. Boone told the man he should have been satisfied, it had cost him nor his wife anything; that he really thought the title was a good [one] when he, in good faith, & from charitable feelings, made the present, now he owned not a single acre of land on earth & was himself dependent upon his children, & had nothing, if ever so well disposed, to give him. But the fellow would not be satisfied -- was still importunate for "the pound of flesh" from the old pioneer. Col. Boone, vexed at the greedy, unfeeling disposition the fellow manifested, finally told him in a quiet way, that he thought he had come a great distance to such a bull, & he reckoned he would have to go home dry. This was the last of the land claimed.> 6S251-252

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:14:13 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28257
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28257


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: <When Nathan Boone was married [1799], it grieved the old Colonel that he had nothing to give him & wife with which to commence the world -- lamented his losses and misfortunes, but his children thought none the less of their revered parent. He was rigidly honest, & possessed nice perceptions of justice.> 6S252

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:14:54 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28258
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28258


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: DB with Derry and grandson William Hays Jr started on a fall-winter hunt in 1808. Headed for the Kanzas river. (Is a tree in Callaway county marked "DB 1808.") Near where Independence now stands. Met a lone Indian who invited them to his camp; they proceeded there, the Indian in lead on horseback, but when within some half mile of the camp, he gallopped ahead yelling to his comrads, and they all came chasing DB and company. Escaped but lost their traps. This trip DB fell sick, and instructed his companions to bury him between two certain trees near camp in case of his death; thus the truth in the Peck story. Returned without any furs, the trip a complete failure. 6S247-248

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:16:14 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28259
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28259


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
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None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Never discovered by DB, but by Nathan. Worked by Nathan and DMB beginnin in 1806 with 6-8 men; one furnace of forty kettles; made 25 or 30 bushes of salt per day; boated down to St. Louis sold for $2-2.50 per bushel. Later enlarged the furnace and kept 16-20 men working, making 100 bushels per day. 300 gallons of water for a bushel of salt. Contunied for four years, but did not prove profitable because of the troubles and pilferings of the Indians, stealing the salt and killing the workers. DMB sold to James Morrison. Nathan disposed of his interest in 1811. 6S245-46

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:17:11 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28260
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28260


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: <During DB's home hunts, while he was yet robust, he would HOPPUS home his deer -- i.e. fasten it upon his back & thus convey it home.> 6S249

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:18:11 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28261
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28261


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Nathan and William Lamme (son-in-law of Flanders Callaway), James Hair [?], James and John Callaway went trapping in the fall-winter of 1803 to the Niango, as far west as the Kanzas; made a good hunt; some furs stolen by Indians. The next year, 1804, during their winter trap, in late November, Nathan with Matthias Van Bibber were surprised in camp by a party of 22 Osages, who took 3 horses and what furs they could find and told Nathan to "clear out as there was another party hunting for them, & then departed." Within a few minutes they were overtaken by another party; said they were Sauks, but were Osages; a standoff for several hours, the party being added to by more arrivals; finally, the Indians and the whites jointly concluding they could not fight without losing some of their own, the Indians took nearly everything the two men had, and went off. Without bullets, they had no meat; Indians had stolen their blanket coats; was snowing; they hundreds of miles from home; eating haws and grapes remaining from fall; came across an old Indian camp and recovered some lead from a tree where Indians had shot at a mark; made four balls; came across abandoned Indian cabins, in one a panther, which Nathan shot and they ate; skinned and wore the coat. Finally came across a hunter party including James Callaway, Nathan's nephew. Inexpressible joy. Resumed their way home, and Nathan arrived on 12/24/1804. Olive: <It was the first Christmas he had spent at home since our marriage and I had to thank the Indians for that.> Nathan never fully recovered from the exposure he suffered on this adventure; Van Bibber suffered as well, and died some 2-3 years later on Gauley River in Western VA. On this return they discovered Boone's Lick. 6S23

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:18:54 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28262
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28262


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Says DB never returned to KY, despite what Peck says, and despite "the romance of a land witness story of Audubon." 6S231-231

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:20:33 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28263
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28263


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Winter of 1801 DB, accompanied by Derry ("a fine & faithful negro of Daniel Morgan Boone's, then 22 years of age, who was fond of going out with his old master"), took traps and went out on the Bourbeuse for beaver; spent most of the winter there, got 30-40; DB set traps, Derry kept camp, cooked, prepared the pelts. Meanwhile DMB and Nathan went out to the Niango river, easterly branch of the Grand Osage, and trapped some 100 beaver, also some deer and bear. The spring of 1802, after these hunts, two hatters from Lexington KY came to MO and bought these beaver from the Boones. The next year Nathan with William Lamme trapped the Pomme de Terre and Grand River; brought back some 900 beaver; lost about 100 to the Indians, who raided their cache. Nathan himself took them to Lexington and sold them for about $2.50 each. 6S228

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:23:25 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28264
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28264


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: Summer-fall of 1801 DMB and Nathan hunted on the Bourbeuse, killing deer for skins, which brought 40 cents per pound in St. Louis. Deer was plentiful and they made "a pretty fair hunt." DB joined his boys in the latter part of the summer; then he joined a hunting of the Shawnees and theere met Jimmy Rogers (note that Rogerstown on the Merrimack River is noted on the map of Missouri in Wetmore's Gazeteer) and Jackson [?] whose Indian name was "Fish," together with an old squaw, survivors of his old acquaintances when a prisoner in 1778. Subsequently he visited his Shawnee friends at their town near Owen's Station, some 12 miles NW of St. Louis, near by Florrissant (LCD says this too on Wetmore's map). [See 16C132 for more on this; seems to be some confusion between Jimmy Rogers and Indian Phillips] 6S228

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:23:58 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28265
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28265


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

Keywords
None.
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None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: DB was appointed "commandant" of the Femme Osage, which was separated from the district of St. Charles, possibly, Nathan thought, to allow the Americans to settle in a district of their own where they would be under the juristiction of authorities of their own nation rather than the Spanish officers; apparently there had been some trouble or grumbling or something already. Because of this office, DB did not settle his concession, which was all bottom land, lying between DMB's and the Missouri river. Nathan believed that the Syndic office and the Commandant office were separate and distinct: Syndid being similar to a justice of the peace, having only civil jurisdiction, Commandant both civil and military, commanding the militia of his district. In civil matters the governing was more by EQUITY than LAW. Capital offences were tried before the Governor, who heard the testimony and decided by equity (mentions a case, decided a few years before the Boones arrived, in which the Governor sentenced a murderer to be strapped to the bottom of a canoe, holes drilled in the bottom, and it to be sunk and the man drowned; Nathan later knew the family well). DB had been exempted by the Governor from having to improve his land; Spainsh law required the settler to make an actual occupation and improve ten acres annually until one-tenth of the whole was improved. Because he failed to do this, DB later lost his claim before two sets of land Commissioners from the US. 6S225-226

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:36:59 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28266
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28266


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: In 3/1800 DMB married Sarah Lewis, daughter of John Lewis of the Bon Homme settlement on the east side of the Missouri river -- an entirely American settlement begun in 1798, and composed of Lewis, John Long, Capt. James Mackey, Lawrence Long, Francis Howell and some other heads of families mostly from Kentucky. DMB's settlement included a number of young unmarried men (including Joseph Haines, John Lindsay, Joshua Dotson, Samuel Clay, and Samuel Watkins) who had come out in 1798 -- and the area was thus known as Bachelor's Bottom. These two were, at the time, the only AMerican settlements in Upper Louisiana. 6S224-225

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:39:27 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28267
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28267


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: The cabin Nathan built in the spring of 1800 was very small, and had no floor. When the spring rains began, water came in and stood several inches deep. Olive Boone and her negro girl got poles and laid them down for string pieces, peeled elm bark and laid it down as a floor, the rough side up to prevent its rolling up. Nathan and DB absent hunting. Olive and her negro girl got all the wood, fed the cattle; to make a seive she peeled a piece of bark from a hickory tree, bent it together into a proper size, lapped the ends and stickhed them with bark strings, then tanned a deer skin with ashes, stretched it tightly over the hoop and fastened it; with a heated wire burned holes through the skin. Answered very well for a seive. Nathan erected a good substantial log cabin in the summer of 1800; and several years later replaced it with "a commodious stone building." DB "built him" a shop and had a set of tools; and when at home would make and repair traps, repain guns, do the needed smith work of the family, sometimes for neighbors to oblige them. After a few years he disposed of these tools. Olive took possession of this deserted shop for her loom while DB and Nathan were away on a hunt. There was no fireplace in the shop, so Olive sent her negro girl to a neighbors's place for the loan of a cross-cut saw; together they cut through several courses of logs, laid stone, and made a fireplace with a stick chimney, mud for mortar; proved to have the best draft of any chimney on the farm. Upon their return, Nathan and DB could hardly believe what she had done. 6S243-44

File: 6S4.DR1



    Created: 8/14/2017 4:41:40 PM
    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-22302-28268
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?27-40-22302-28268


1851

Draper Manuscripts: Daniel Boone Papers, 1760-1911, Series S, Wisconsin Historical Society (Madison, Wisconsin)

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None.
People
None.
Interview with Nathan and Olive Van Bibber Boone, Green county MO, 10/25-11/9/1851: DB reached St. Louis in the latter part of 10/1799. Boat party arrived about the same time. DB called on Gov. Delassus; Trudeau was still there, and although supersceded, he used his influence and had his promises to DB confirmed: blank concessions were given to DB according to a list of the number of persons accompanying him -- leaving him to designate the tracts and fill in the names, and they were ante-dated to conrrespond with the time Trudeau had written to Boone, in order that they might hold good in the event of the expected transfer of jurisdiction of the country from Spain to France. DB then drove the stock (horses, cattle, some sheep and hogs) above the mouth of the Missouri and there crossed and went on to DMB's place, to where Nathan and Olive had preceded them, having reached St. Louis just after the party had gone up river, and proceeded across the country to St. Charles. There Nathan met his father, who he found had but half a dollar left, having just purchased some 25 pounds of flour for which he had paid a guinea. DMB's slaves had raised some 10-15 acres of crops & all were thus comfortably provided for the winter, which DB and Rebecca, Nathan and Olive, spent at DMB's. DB and Nathan made no long hunts that fall and winter, only going out to kill occasional deer and turkies for "home supplies of meat." The others selected their lands and had them surveyed and moved out upon them. DMB was on the bluff, a mile back from the mouth of the Missouri, about 25 miles above St. Charles village. Nathan's did not receive his grant at the same time as his father; having reached St. Louis after DB, his name was not included on the original list, but purchased his home lot from Robert Hall, paying for it his only horse, saddle and bridle (subsequently he got his concession at Loutre Lick). This property, of some 400 acres, was located about four miles from DMB's, northwest, and on the northern bank of the Femme Osage, some 6 or 7 miles above the mouth and about 25 miles from St. Charles village. At sugar making time DB and Rebecca went out to Nathan's place and built a half-faced camp and made sugar for some weeks: 3-4 hundred weight. Meanwhile Nathan built a ca