Joseph Sinclair to William Medill, August 19, 1846

Joseph Sinclair to William Medill, August 19, 1846

Keywords
None.
People
None.
[Roll 418_157 - Roll 418_158]
The Miami have received word from traders that Congress and the President may reconsider their removal; Sinclair knows this word to be false. Regardless, the Chief believes this, and wants to wait further to remove. Sinclair writes that he has <said to the Indians that [he] should ask the Government to authorize their removal by force, and that it was highly probable that such authority would be given; and [he] now make[s] the application to the Department for the adoption of such measures as may be considered adequate and proper to secure the emigration of the Miamis-- a very small force will be sufficient.> Sinclair's goal with this force is to make the Miami look upon the government with more respect. Sinclair calls the traders conspiring with the Miami villainous in this matter.



    Created: 4/24/2019 2:17:59 PM
    Project: Intro to the Miami Tribe
    Creator: Cain, Madison
    ID: 57-445-26060-40441
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?57-445-26060-40441


Joseph Sinclair to William Medill, August 19, 1846

Keywords
None.
People
None.
[Roll 418_160 & Roll 418_162]
This letter is written on the same day as one of the others from Sinclair to Medill. He writes hastily to Medill after closing council with the Miami. Sinclair's goal in this council was to convey to the Miami that there would be no reconsideration in their removal by the President; that the information they had received about this potential reconsideration was false. Sinclair says he told the Miami that <there could be no hopes of their obtaining a reconsideration, that their government acted with prudence and decision, and would not be driven from a position that had been deliberately taken.> Sinclair also <explained to the Indians fully their obligation to remove and the requirements of the Department in that respect, and called upon them to decide now whether they would submit to the Treaty of 1840 and quietly remove without any further delay or not, that it was no longer a question of time.> This left the Miami with two options, in Sinclair's view: they could <commence the emigration in good faith, or refuse to keep their faith with the government.>



    Created: 4/25/2019 12:19:04 PM
    Project: Intro to the Miami Tribe
    Creator: Cain, Madison
    ID: 57-445-26060-40448
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?57-445-26060-40448


Joseph Sinclair to William Medill, August 19, 1846

Keywords
None.
People
None.
[Roll 418_160 & Roll 418_162]
Sinclair also writes to Medill that the Miami said the <country set apart for them west had been represented to be a good country, but they had been to see it and found it to be a very poor country, and had asked to exchange it for another.> The government refused to accommodate the Miami's request for an exchange of their new land.
Sinclair completes his letter to Medill by explaining that he explicitly asked the Chief what their decision was in regarding to removing. The Chief replied, <they could not remove now, that they had plenty of corn in the ground and could live without their money.> Therefore, the Miami decided to give up the promise of annuities to put off their removal slightly longer. This goes against the wishes of Sinclair, Medill, and the rest of the department.



    Created: 4/29/2019 11:44:30 AM
    Project: Intro to the Miami Tribe
    Creator: Cain, Madison
    ID: 57-445-26060-40525
    Permanent Link: https://sourcenotes.miamioh.edu/id?57-445-26060-40525














    

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