1967

Timothy Flint and Folsom James K., BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIR OF DANIEL BOONE: THE FIRST SETTLER OF KENTUCKY INTERSPERSED WITH INCIDENTS IN THE EARLY ANNALS OF THE COUNTRY(New Haven: College & University Press, 1967)

Keywords
Flint
People
Flint
Selects and eliminates what he considers inessential to his task of analysing the force of progress. We hear little, then of DB the man, relatively much of him as a historical type. DB develops in the book from an individual in the first chapter into a type by the end. This also allows Flint to gloss over the misfortunes and hardships of DB's life. We never actually receive any personal shock from these events. His authorial stance is carefully dispassionate; he implies that DB's own dedication to the historical process is so great that personal misfortune matters less to him than to ordinary people. Thus he makes DB acquiese willingly in the loss of his lands -- potentially the most damning implicit criticism of society in his life. His Missouri remove is presented as what he would want to do anyway. The price Flint pays for this is that DB remains a shadowy character, totally subsumed in the process, with almost no personality. He never comes to life. Flint explains DB's character with the 18th century psychological theory of "ruling passion," which for DB was his "love of the chase." We prefer our literary Boone's at odds with society rather than its willing servant. We miss any sense of tragedy in Flint's bio. "We miss the bitter wisdom that the general good of society is not always and of necessity equatable with the particular good of one of its members. And we cannot accept the tempting, though illogical, idea that the greatest good for the greatest nujmber somehow implies a little good for everyone." Folsom in FLINT1:18-19

File: FLNT1.NT1



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    Project: Digitizing Daniel Boone
    Creator: Faragher, John Mack
    ID: 27-40-20651-28119
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